Our cat is on Prozac ...

United States
January 16, 2007 3:48pm CST
and she is still peeing on things. She is 13 years old and has issues. That is why she is on the "Kitty Prozac". It was helping but she might be leveling off and losing the full effect. My wife understands our cat inside and out but she cannot figure out what her issue is lately. She pissed on two of our beds last week. Before this she might pee on something once every two weeks. I would appreciate some ideas as to what might help stop this behavior. Ps. When we take her to the Vet it usually costs us a few hunded bucks for them to say she is old and looney.
3 people like this
21 responses
• United States
17 Jan 07
It is interesting that you speak about cats peeing on things. My cat is only a little over a year old and about a month ago she started peeing on things. It is beginning to get very annoying. No one has been able to tell me why she is doing it. How long has your cat been on the kitty prozac? One thing I was told is that she is doing it because she has not been fixed as of yet. I do not believe this since it is usually the male cat that does it to mark his territory. Someone else said she is doing it because she is just plain mad at me. Does the vet think that this is a problem that ultimately is unfixable?
3 people like this
• United States
17 Jan 07
The first thing the vet will tell you is that you need to rule out that it is a physical problem. Once you do, then you have a tough road because this isa behavioral problem that is VERY hard to fix. It could be a variety of issues that is making your cat do it. Ours started because her littler box was in the bottom of a closet next to a dirty laundry basket. She began to associate dirty laundry with her littter box. Now, in her later years she has upgraded to our guest beds. The recent activity may be because she missed some Prozac over the holidays. (I hope) But--Prozac does eliminate this problem 98% of the time. However, I wouldn't be quick to put your animal on medication. I only did it because she had two other nervous disorders including a self-mutilation problem which involved attacking her tail. I have the most sensitive cat on the planet!!!! Anyway...if you do go prozac...ask for a topical. It's awesome to just put it on her ear. As any cat owner knows..giving a cat a pill is a nightmare!
2 people like this
@blueskies (1186)
• United States
17 Jan 07
Hey! My cat has that disorder as well. He doesn't attack his tail, he attacks his hind legs--but he has all the other behaviors. Considering my son and I are both pretty odd, we figure the cat fits right in with our household. Has the prozac helped the feline hyperesthesia? My only suggestions for the cat peeing issue would be to make an additional litterbox available. Sometimes that will help.
@clownfish (3278)
• United States
17 Jan 07
Hi! I'm just curious to know what breed your cat is. Is the black and white cat in the pic the one you're referring to? She looks just like mine. He's a MC and I've been having behavioral issues with him, too. He's 16 and he's had cancer for over two years. He keeps waking me up in the middle of the night, incessantly. The vet gave me pain medication for him and the last few nights, he's done a lot better. But seriously, I was thinking of treating him for anxiety. I didn't know cats could have anxiety disorders!
2 people like this
@clownfish (3278)
• United States
17 Jan 07
Thanks! I just started researching this issue a few nights ago - getting desperate from waking up a crabby cow because my kitty is waking me up all night! LOL He does have symptoms, like following me around and nervous eating. I can only give him as much as he can eat at one time, otherwise he will gorge, throw up, then want to eat again. He is interested in playing and catnip, so I think for his age and condition he's doing really well. He is also arthritic, so that's what made me think of the pain medication. I think it's helping, the past two nights he's been sleeping more and waking me less. If he doesn't keep getting better, though, I will look into getting him treated for anxiety. Thanks for the great information! :-)
2 people like this
@blueskies (1186)
• United States
17 Jan 07
I forgot to mention, my OCD kitty is also black and white (white with black spots). That's very odd that it's seen more frequently in black and white cats.
@brokentia (10396)
• United States
17 Jan 07
You pay that much for the vet to tell you that? I would seek a different vet! One, you are paying way too much for a visit! And two, you would think the vet would offer a better solution! I have never heard of Kitty Prozac! I am seriously going to have to tell my sister about this one! Her cat is a cranky butt! So, I can't see how it would hurt! You might want to consider keeping those bedroom doors closed until she is done with her phase of peeing on beds. Only allow her to be in the bedroom when you are. This way you can address the issue right away with your cat. She will get the point. :)
2 people like this
• United States
17 Jan 07
Well, a standard visit is usually about 100 because she'll need a shot or something to stay up to date. And then you add the additional tests to make sure she isn't sick...it can add up. That's why now when she goes, we avoid a lot of tests because she is usually just nuts! She gave herself irritible bowel from stress and also stopped eating twice. (A shot of steroids cures that) The kitty prozac is amazing. It is actually the same stuff they give people. Look into it!
1 person likes this
@rsmith512 (1561)
• United States
20 Jan 07
That is a great idea BrokenTia! I bet if you would close all of the bedroom doors that you don't want her in it might help. It is worth a shot! LOL :D
@lisado (1230)
• United States
17 Jan 07
My mom and dad's cat went thru this about two years ago and all it was was that she had a bladder or urinary track infection. I haven't checked your other replies, but has the vet checked her for that? It was a simple and inexpensive fix. She was on an antibiotic for 10 days. Just had to add it to her favorite can of food and she snarfed it down, no problem. Have you thought about changing vets?
2 people like this
• United States
17 Jan 07
Unfortunately the cat is getting older. When they get that old, they lose control and cant help it.
1 person likes this
• United States
17 Jan 07
If you're talking about my cat--I would tend to agree with you if she was going in random places. Trust me--this cat is VERY calculated with what she does. It is her way of "communicating." Now that she has gotten the prozac regularly...we're doing ok so far. But we'll see.
1 person likes this
@nuttmeg (441)
• United States
17 Jan 07
Wow! You have some patience lol. My mother's cat tends to pull stuff like this, which usually has to do with routine and the litterbox situation, and God forbid you move the litterbox from it general location. I've never heard of a cat having so many issues, even after working at a vet. The peeing of beds, both human and the dogs, sounds like definite behavioral, whether dominant/territory or hi-I'm-pissed-at-you-all. Where are you keeping her litterbox now, might I ask? And are you cleaning it often throughout the day? I noticed at one point that mom's cat hated her box in high-traffic areas or places that were noisy. The cat before the current was also scared of her...uh, whatever came out, which result in her going anywhere but the litterbox. Is she using the box at all?
1 person likes this
@nuttmeg (441)
• United States
17 Jan 07
Wanted to add that I hear lavender-scented detergants helps to keep the kitties away a bit, for whatever.
1 person likes this
@clownfish (3278)
• United States
17 Jan 07
Hi! This is just an idea, but another thing that makes cats pee in inappropriate places can be kidney/bladder/urinary infections. We had a cat with this problem for years and never knew she was having kidney infections. This might be something to check. :-)
• Italy
17 Jan 07
for this problem with my dog, we have founnd a itelligent solution!we bougth an attractive spray!
@crazynurse (7510)
• United States
17 Jan 07
When I went on an extended vacation a few years back, my older male cat began peeing on rugs when we returned. I assumed he had a urinary tract infection and took him to the vet. He tested him and said he did not have an infection and wrote it up as anxiety/depression due to my leaving him for so long. (he was cared for by a neighbor). He put my male cat on female hormones. This did the trick. No more wetting. But, one evening as I was petting him, I noticed lumps on his belly area. Alarmed, I took him to the vet the next day. The vet enjoyed teasing me, saying, "I thought you were a nurse...do you not know boobs when you see them?" Oh gosh, it was so embarrassing. He stayed on the hormones for about 3 weeks and didn't have a problem until years later ...and that time it was a urinary tract infection. You may want to inquire about male hormones for your cat..I don't know. good luck!
1 person likes this
• United States
17 Jan 07
I feel like I've been living in the dark, but I never even knew vets prescribed "Kitty Prozac!" That's crazy... It sounds like your cat is just getting old. I have 5 cats and they all get moody and misbehave. My cats pretty much do what they want, and it doesn't help if I give them extra attention, treats, etc. Do you have other pets that could be stressing her out? Maybe you should try another vet.
1 person likes this
@wolflvr (336)
• United States
17 Jan 07
I never knew that black and white cats tend to be more anxious and needy. My cat (the one in my picture) is definately anxious and needy. I have a male cat and every once and a while he will pee where is not supposed to. Being a male he more prone to urinary problems and when he pees it pretty much means a trip to the vet. If you have ruled health issues then I would say it was something mental. I once heard that if the cat pees right in front of you while you are looking at them then they are trying to tell you something. Could it also be that your cat is getting old and can't get to her litterbox in time maybe you need more litter boxes around the house.
1 person likes this
@plantit1 (298)
• United States
17 Jan 07
My husband just told me about kitty prozac. I have a cat who pees on the stove. How nasty is that? Anyway I think its' a territory thing. I have four other cats as well and they all want dominion. I put in a kitty door for them so they can go out and use the the big litter box, the yard. It has helped alot. As far as cats on prozac, well the world is really going crazy. This proves it to me.
1 person likes this
@katenkim (240)
• Singapore
17 Jan 07
just buy a peeing mattress, i forgot what they call it, but i bought it for my cat, just go to the store and explain the issue, they know waht to give you.
@Sissygrl (10999)
• Canada
17 Jan 07
Not to knock your cleanliness or anything but my cat will pee on things if it's litter box is even slightly dirty. Could this be the problem ? maybe she doesn't like the smell of her own box!
1 person likes this
@imadriscoll (2235)
• United States
17 Jan 07
This is really insensitive to cat lovers I'm sure ... but the only way that I think of that will ensure that the cat doesn't pee on your stuff again is to put it down. Honestly, you will save hundreds of dollars on vet visits, cleaning carpets, replacing bedding, cat food, cat litter ... so on and so on. I think that it sounds like your cat is getting old and needs to be put to rest.
@clownfish (3278)
• United States
17 Jan 07
Hi! Yes, your post is insensitive to cat lovers! Are you kidding - 13 is just getting started for a cat! Our cats have averaged 19 years in age. Putting this cat down would cheat them of the 6 or 7 good years the cat has left! Not everyone's solution is to put it down or flush it down the toilet or abandon it at the first sign of trouble. My cat has had cancer for over 2 years. He is doing great. If I had put him down when they told me to, I'd have missed all this great time with him. And, my family had a cat like the one in this post. She lived to be 19 and we cherished her. So much for putting them down.
• United States
18 Jan 07
Yea...I would say that isn't the best response in a section dominated by people who love their animal. I guess it comes down to if you aren't a fan of cats--you just can't understand the need to help them get through this problem. If only we could put people down for behavioral problems huh? And BTW...she has been doing this off and on since she was about 6--so it is behavior...not age.
• United States
18 Jan 07
I just don't understand why people would spend so much money on a cat that pees all over their stuff! There are so many better things that this money could go towards ... hmmm, let's try to think of some ... world hunger (of humans)for one. Can you really compare your cat or putting down any animal to putting down a human for bad behavior?? Guess what, you're cat is JUST a cat ... it's not a person!
@rsmith512 (1561)
• United States
20 Jan 07
I have never heard of "Kitty Prozac". I would have never even thought that a kitty could have Prozac. And that is a lot of money just for a vet visit. You might need to see a different vet that will actually give you more advice and help. I don't know about the peeing thing, but I would definatley see a different vet. :D
@badkat83 (1621)
• United States
19 Jan 07
I used to have a cat that did that since I brought it home. I never realized that it did it as it didn't do it often. I never took it to the vet cause it was evil. If I tried to pick it up it would bite me. So I kept the cat for about 7 years. I finally had to get rid of her as I was finding she was peeing on the rug and a few other places. Yes the beds too. Sad but I brought her to my Aunts friends barn. He takes good care of them. And I hear she is doing great, ruling the roost. Anyway, I really don't have any advice, I thought I would just share my story.
@maru_047in (1007)
• India
18 Jan 07
Is this from few days or what if it is from few days then i think so it is old as the doctor says cause if it was not pissing and peeing anywhere in the house than how come it is doing it from few days
• India
17 Jan 07
yeah men cats are always very irrating
• United States
17 Jan 07
This may explain... Cats are very uncomfortable when a change in enviroment is made. Examples: introduction of other animals, newborns, recent move in residents, even new furniture. I know this as we have had two such instances. Our cat actually took several weeks before adapted and returning to her normal peeing routine.
@mewfree (78)
• France
17 Jan 07
nice discussion have a nice day