Irresponsible Employers

United States
January 16, 2007 6:01pm CST
In Austin, there is a freeze with snow and more expected. This is a very rare occurrence so it is stressing the infrastructure SEVERELY. A lot of the highways have been closed. So what happens when employees don't go to work and get occurrences because the employer didn't close their doors? The employee gets fired. So, what kind of protection do employees have from these folks who would rather have their business running than their employees alive?
2 people like this
4 responses
@KrauseHome (35341)
• United States
24 Jan 07
It is Sad when places are like this, and unfortunately there are a lot of places that only care about someone showing up for work, and not if they can do it safely. I think that there needs to be a Law somewhere about this, but then if Texas is one of those they can fire with no reason like WA state is, then you have no say in the matter, and then that place is probably not one you should want to be working for anyways. I would check out the Rules governing your area and state, and then go from there.
• United States
13 Feb 07
Texas IS a right-to-work state, unfortunately. And with the number of illegal immigrants here, all employees have to do their ultimate best (including at points risking their lives) to get to work every day if they want to keep their jobs. My hubby's job is with a MAJOR shipping company, doing support for their website. They tried to force him to go in to work on days that there were power lines down across our roads. I was very angry.
@ronita34 (3923)
• Canada
18 Jan 07
Well this is sort of a hard one for me because i live in a very cold climate during winter. We get snow and lots of it for about 5 months. Here where i live in Canada schools and businesses do not close unless it is minus 32 degrees celcius! I can see your point though if it was due to icy conditions then i think it is unfair for your employer to act in such a way!
1 person likes this
• United States
18 Jan 07
On Canada the infrastructure is set up to deal with it though. Ice doesn't mean major power outages and roadways closed/ Here an ice storm is the equivalent of having a blizzard up there with the stress is puts on the infrastructure. There just isn't enough salt and de-icing compound available to make it safe to go out of your house. For some reason a lot of the employers down here don't seem to realize this.
@nw1911guy (1135)
• United States
18 Jan 07
That's an excellent question. I wish I had an answer for you. It's one of those things I've wondered for a while. Does anyone else have any ideas? I would contact whoever oversees the the employers, like Labor and Industries.
• United States
13 Feb 07
I am guessing we would have to file a class action suit on behalf of everyone who got injured trying to make it to a certain employer. Going after one of the bigger employers should be an example to the smaller ones. Maybe then they will offer settlements. Guess we will see.
• United States
14 Feb 07
A few years back we had over 4 feet of snow drop in one evening. It took my husband most of the morning to shovel us out. My boss called me to say she was going in late and asked if I would go in with her. The other people lived further away and decided not to show up at all. She called our corporate office to let them know and they told her that because she was manager that she would have to go in. She made me go in with her. The others had to take a personal day. I was not penalized for going in late. Why should anyone risk life and limb because an employer refuses to close shop? When we got to work the phone never rang and we didn't get one customer. The one good thing was that I did get a lot of paperwork done.