If you have an autistic child, and use behaviour modification...

United States
January 30, 2007 3:28pm CST
What do you use as a reward. One of the things our family used, a lot, were M&Ms. They're quick, easy, and fairly inexpensive.
2 people like this
4 responses
• Canada
1 Feb 07
We use Pokemon Cards or hockey cards. My son goes really nutty on sugar, so I try to avoid using sugary things as an award. He gets little thigns from school like pencils and spinning tops and plastic rings ... which he keeps in his 'treasure' bin ... he adores his treasures, though he almost never looks at them ... and no one else is allowed to touch them.
• United States
2 Feb 07
That's really neat that something like that works for him. As my son is getting older, his "currency" is a little different. I threaten for him to "loose a star" (that's what his K teacher does for her reward system) and he knows if he does, he cannot play his XBox. Thanks.
• Canada
5 Feb 07
yah I expect that the 'currency' (good term!) will change for us as he grows. We do use game time on his gamecube too - but that has already satarted to work less and less. His older brother is really into Pokemon, so I am hoping the Pokemon will hold for a bit longer.
@kittykatzz (1133)
• United States
31 Jan 07
well we DEFINITELY have used LOTS of smarties and sweettarts.. we still do once in a while... our son is 9 now and doesnt require the reward as much as he once did.. they even used to have to use the candy in school to get him to do his work.. he does much better now with a reward such as going to the arcade or bowling on the weekend if he does well for the whole week.. most things wont stop him from going altogether.. but he knows that there are some unnacceptable behaviors (ie: hitting anyone(or his brother) complaints from the school and such) that will cancel out the weekend activity.. he usually gets to go, and is usually doing bery well... we are now beginning to implement a reward in change for homework (which is completely new to him) but he'll recieve like .25-.50 for each nights completed assignment and we'll take trips to the store on fridays so he can get his sunkist and reese's!! as long as he's doing a good job!.. all kids need the instant gratification when they're little.. our kids even moreso, but now he's learning to work hard during the week to get his rewards onthe weekends or once a week!
• United States
31 Jan 07
My son CHOWED down on smarties on Halloween. I mean, the kid could not get enough of this stuff. I could hide them, and he'd find them. Oddly enough, the next day was one of his better days at school. LOL I joked that we needed to put him on the smarties diet. LOL!
1 person likes this
• United States
31 Jan 07
Hi, Kitty, it's great when you can move on to other things. Our son does pretty well, so we haven't gotten so much to the weekend stuff (ie., like you said, bowling or aracade). But, his Kindergarten teacher uses a star reward system. And, if I threaten to "pull a star", he knows he cannot play his Xbox. So, it's great to be able to have consequences with him - as before we weren't.
• United States
31 Jan 07
We have tried to use behavior modification for my sister, but it didn't work out so well. She still would not respond or interact with us. We went to her doctor and asked why it didn't work, and they say that not every child responds to every treatment. That is a neat idea though! I'm glad it's working out for your family.
• United States
31 Jan 07
You would need to research it, but there's something called the "son shine" program - or something. This where people get right down on the autistic person's level and go into their "world" and slowly get them to interact, bringing them into the real world. It's worth looking in to.
@weemam (13389)
30 Jan 07
I have a friend with 2 teenage boys with autism she hads a brilliant website for parents and grandparents of children with a autism , be carefull with M&M as they used to have a lot of e addatives xx
• United States
31 Jan 07
Oh, that's something we did years ago. Now, they're off the incentive and reward. Now, for them, a "high five" suffices. What's your friend's website?