Will you do the research first?

@soccermom (3200)
United States
February 10, 2007 9:25pm CST
I am not a political authority, but I do take an interest when it is election time as to who the candidates are and what they are all about. I'm just curious as to how many of you take the time to do the research and get the facts straight before you vote. And not go by what is said on sensationalized news networks, what your coworkers heard, etc.. I just responded to a post that said Obama was muslim and sworn in a a koran. This is not true, the muslim Senator is Keith Ellison. That's why we must get informed before we vote. How do you feel?
6 people like this
8 responses
@ssh123 (31100)
• India
11 Feb 07
In India most of the unemployed and underemployed people show great interest in politics and elections. There is no need to do any research on politicians who are standing for elections, because the TV and newspapermen publish their detailed horoscope with deeds and misdeeds, scandals in which these so called politicians are involved. 1 out of hundred get a clean chit. But all said and done, these scroundrels get elected by giving money to lakhs of people (mostly poor and uneducated people) and get their votes. When they come to power, they indulge in corruption to collect back their money spent during the elections. It will be ten fold.
@soccermom (3200)
• United States
11 Feb 07
It's nice to know we're not the only ones with a corrupt government. Wouldn't it be great (although unrealistic) if money could be taken out of the equation?
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Feb 07
But is it a good idea to trust that what the TV and newspapers publish is true? Sure some of it is, but wouldn't it be better to research politicians yourself rather than blindly trusting others?
@lauriefnp (5112)
• United States
11 Feb 07
I agree with you 100%. I listen to people at work, and I'll listen to opinions here and on other forums. I also watch both CNN and FOX news for the differing points of view, and I read Newsweek. I will be sure that I understand where the candidates stand on the major issues before voting. I always vote in the primaries, also, which a lot of people don't bother to do. You're example about someone confusing Obama and Ellison is a good one. I read another post today asking who we would vote for : Hillary vs. Obama. This was an American user who posted the discussion, not even understanding how the primaries and elections worked and that only one of the 2 would be the candidate if they were nominated by the party... It was too much for me to get into at that time due to my agitated state this afternoon... I also hate hearing people say that they will vote for Hillary because they liked her husband or for Obama because we need a black President. Please, Americans, vote for the best candidate, not for a gender or race.
2 people like this
@soccermom (3200)
• United States
11 Feb 07
Thank you for your intelligent response!! I've read a lot of the politaical posts on here and had to take a break because I was so frustrated with peoples responses. It aggravates me to no end to see how many people have no idea how the system works! If I remember correctly this was taught in high school! It's no wonder this counrty is seen as "ignorant" with all the uneducated people spouting off at the mouth.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Feb 07
I also get my information from various sources and weigh my opinions clearly. I do not vote along party lines if I can help it. I honestly think that we should do away with the political parties, as I think that is destroying American politics. I have already started finding everything I can about every candidate that is running I have actually started a list(chart style), of the things I like and don't like about each of the candidates. I will not hesitate to vote for the people I like the best, regardless of race, color, or religous affiliation. I encourage everyone to start studying and make up your own minds.
@MntlWard (880)
• United States
12 Feb 07
I'm not sure the context they were using, but there will be a choice of Hillary or Obama (or someone else) in the primary.
@MrNiceGuy (4147)
• United States
12 Feb 07
You are very right. I think most voters are simply bitten by propaganda and the liberal media. The same old rhetoric in popular society is more of a contributor to political brainwashing than the so called corporate conspiracies, or misused partiotism some have charged. I think that is also evident here on MyLot as well.
2 people like this
@soccermom (3200)
• United States
12 Feb 07
Very well said! And you are right that it is evident on mylot here also. I get so irritated sometimes at the things I see posted. I love seeing all the differing opinions but it really chaps my hiney when the opinion has obviosly not been based on fact.
@4ftfingers (1313)
11 Feb 07
i really think it is the job of the government to teach the people of poltics, and gain their interest so they can make informed decissions, rather than rely on personality or other insignificances. i'm not sure how many schools teach it, but for the last few years my little brother has had citizenship lessons at school. these are cumpulsory lessons about politics, being a briton, and their rights etc. we didn't have that when i was at school a few years ago and i think alot of us would have benefitted from it. i have quite an interest in politics, i often argue with my friends who in the last election voted for the labour party because 'tony blair seems like a nice man'...
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Feb 07
That's impossible though for the government to inform people about politics without bias. The government would only inform people things that promote their own agenda and that would get us nowhere. It's the responsibility of the individual to inform themselves about politics in my opinion.
@soccermom (3200)
• United States
12 Feb 07
Smartie I think what 4ftfingers is trying to say is that in Briain they have classes that teach you how their government works and that it's mandatory to take them. I remember when I was in high school (a long time ago LOL)we had a class teaching us how the US government works. I've read a lot of posts on here about politics and it amazes me how many people don't understand our system. That tells me either it's not a graduation requirement anymore, or people don't pay attention.
• United States
12 Feb 07
oh sorry I didn't mean to misunderstand. I guess I assumed that in all places, students were taught about the government at young ages.
@Smith2028 (797)
• United States
18 Feb 07
I agree. There is no point in voting if someone is not willing to do the research necessary to ensure they are voting for the best person for that office. In national elections it is even more important to look at the history of a candidate to get a feel of what they might do in the future.
1 person likes this
@moonmagick (1458)
• United States
12 Feb 07
I definately agree. I certainly plan to do my research, I think it is very important to make an informed decision on anything in life, especially something this large scale.
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Feb 07
I think that everyone should research the candidates before they choose who to vote for or at least research the candidate that they are planning on voting for. Although I know that some people don't vote for that very reason. A lot of people are just too lazy to vote.
1 person likes this
11 Feb 07
I think everyone should be informed with all the facts before they vote and make sure they make a true decision. However I think that we can never truely know the facts as every written thing is swayed to try to get you to form an opinion on one thing or another.
1 person likes this