Does mental illness effect your life?

@cassidy22 (2975)
United States
May 19, 2007 9:28pm CST
I decided to post something of a more serious nature. Does mental illness effect you? My husband is bipolar, and I think has seasonal affective disorder (not so funny that the acronym is SAD) I've been trying to understand HIS illness and how I can be a positive influence, how I can NOT be a trigger, and how I can encourage him to seek treatment without being a nag. His case is not severe. And I have seen other people whose lives have been devastated by mental illness, as well as the social stigma behind it, that leads people to NOT get treated for it. Has it effected your life?
2 people like this
10 responses
@tonixxx (358)
20 May 07
Firstly, i think that it is difficult to measure the severity of mental illnesses as the tell tale signs can not adequetly disclose the full picture. People can learn to hide the severity by forcing smiles but because someone with an illness such as depression appears happy on the outside do not be fooled that there is any less turmoil on the inside. It is generally the people you least expect that take the most drastic measures. I suggest keeping him occupied make the effort to do things with him that you know interest him and give him enjoyment. Fill his world with happiness so to speak. I understand that it is hard on you so make sure that you have support also. Mental illnesses affect everyone in contact with them much like any other illness.
2 people like this
@cassidy22 (2975)
• United States
20 May 07
Yeah, I didn't write this post about me and my husband. I was hoping to let other people share THEIR stories. Thanks for the post though.
• Belgium
20 May 07
iam with you in the same way good luck for us
1 person likes this
• United States
20 May 07
My daughter has bipolar. It is not easy living with that disease or someone who has it. My daughter belongs to an on line support group for people with bipolar so maybe you could find an online group for families of bipolar patients. Education about the disease is the only thing that really helps.
1 person likes this
@cassidy22 (2975)
• United States
21 May 07
I am on an online support group. It's called "findthelight.net" and they have a ton of online support forums, from bipolar and depression to substance abuse. I do like the support there, but most of the people I read about on there are SO sick they can't keep jobs, have gone through divorce, etc. It's very different from what my husband is going through, but it is helpful to see their perspective.
@tigertang (1750)
• Singapore
19 Jun 07
My ex-wife had bipolar disorder. However, unlike your daughter, I live in a society that is fairly conservative inspite of the rapid economic changes it has gone through in the last few years. Having a mental illness and getting treatment for anything that may smack of the illness is always associated with "Face," an Asian concept that roughly equates to reputation in the West. As such, my ex-wife only started seeking professional help in her early thirties, after she was married to me. Her parents were to embarrased to recognise her issues as medical issues. Unfortunately for the marriage, her bipoloar nature often expressed itself in a violent and unpredictable way. She would suddenly go wild and physically attack me in public - she once chased after me in the men's toilet in a shopping centre in the main shopping area of Singapore. In the end I had one violent episode too many and so instead of hitting her back, I took a protection order against her and that was the prelude to the divorce
@Cassy1976 (796)
• Australia
20 May 07
Yes mental illness has effected my life, I have had severe depression and PTSD and although I have got it under control which took me over 5 years, I still have problems with it every so often. I also have a niece who has bipolar and because I am the only one in her life that understands the problem she always comes to me which can be hard but we have learned to cope that way and in the last year she has come a long way. She does not want to talk to a "shrink" but has one that has put her on medication that has calmed her down alot and we talk about how she feels alot, but even the slightest thing can send her over the edge, but we have gone from having a blow up all day everyday to probably once a week or so. I was told something when I had my problems that really made me think, if you had asthma and you had to take medication for it would you think twice about it? and most people say no, so what is the difference between having to take medication for asthma and taking medication for a mental illness, both will improve your lifestyle!
1 person likes this
• India
20 May 07
Yes mental illness affect life. I have seen many such persons. I am also worried about it. But i think these treatments are rare. And the cost may be too much. I also heard about this. And i will be working them to be treated. We have to help others. Then only others will help us. Please rate me. Thank you.
@GardenGerty (118061)
• United States
20 May 07
My first husband was mildly depressed, even on medication. I loved him dearly. He actually found it to be a relief when he was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease, which was terminal. He chose a very solitary profession, so was gone a lot. I was a not single single parent most of the time my kids were growing up. They each looked at it differently. I have a wonderful friend who is bipolar, and I am so proud of her. She has had several professions, raised four biological kids, some foster kids, and one adopted at risk child. She is a nurse, and a teacher, and I wish I had half her energy when things are good.
@anne25penn (3310)
• Philippines
20 May 07
I have a schizophrenic brother and it's really hard trying to cope especially during the times when they are becoming uncontrollable. My brother becomes uncontrollable when he refuses to take his medicines and he is always angry when we bring him for his sessions with his psychiatrist. As for the social stigma of having a brother with schizophrenia, I never really cared. What's more important for me is my brother, how to care for him. On how you can be a positive influence, it's just showing that you care for him and making him feel that he is not a burden and that you understand and will stay with him, come what may.
1 person likes this
• United States
20 May 07
Mental illness is all around us. For some it hits close to home like in your situation and for some not quite so close, but it is still there. I teach many kids with mental health issues as well as having some family that have struggled. I think the only things you can do are exactly what you are doing. Learn about it and try to be supportive. Don't confuse supportive with enabling. If he needs treatment, you need to tell him. Maybe you should have someone else you trust help you. A minister, relative, or friend that both of you trust. The best way to battle mental illness is through good treatment. The options get better each year. Good luck !
@tigertang (1750)
• Singapore
19 Jun 07
Mental illness is an illness. One of my biggest challenge with my ex-in-laws and my ex-wife who suffers from bipolar was the fact that they simply could not see what was wrong with her. She looked like a normal, healthy young woman. As far as they were concerned, there was no need to take medication, which they saw as a waste of time and money.
@coffeeshot (3786)
• Australia
15 Jun 07
Since i was young i've suffered from another type of disorder called SAD. Social Anxiety Disorder. It has stopped me from completing uni, made me unable to finish certain courses and generally held me back. I have since seen a doctor and am now receiving treatment for it to help me deal with certain situations better. other people in my family have suffered from similar disorders too. My 30 year old cousin has had a terrible life-not being able to hold down jobs or keep friends because of his bi-polar. He is an intelligent man and has semi-completed a psychology degree but because he can't hold a job down because of his terrible depression he can not afford to continue studying. Most people in my family have always called him a 'low life' and 'useless' and 'lazy' because they don't understand that it's an illness. I am close with my cousin and sometimes feel as if I'm the only one who understands him. It's very difficult for me because I kind of know what he's going through, but my problem isn't half as bad as his. I'm living my life yet no matter what specialists he sees, what new medication he takes, he's not getting anywhere.
15 Jun 07
My grandmother has mental issues. Without sound nasty she tunes in and out and goes pretty fruity. Although I had always grown up around the idea "she" was pretending as that's what most of my other family members said. I actually buy it though, especially when she talks about my grandfather still being alive :) ~Joey
• China
21 May 07
I feel worried about the problem as well.With the increasing of work pressure nowadays,a great many of us are deeply disturbed by mental illness.I always assume that more than one half of people have got mental illness including me.Sometimes I feel obviously that I'm typically bipolar with seasonal affective disorder.For a period of time,I had got angry every single day just with something inconsiderable,which can't be controlled at all.