How religious are you?

@ElicBxn (61143)
United States
January 11, 2009 6:44am CST
Okay, I want to start by saying there is NO right or wrong answers to my question. And there is no right or wrong religion either. I want to know HOW religious you are, not whether its a main stream one or not. Are you a "culturally Christian/Jewish/whatever" person. Someone that was brought up a certain way, and you have certain habits of that faith, maybe even claim that faith, but aren't or don't practice or attend services. Are you a "Sunday/holy day/whatever" member of your faith. You go on the required day, but maybe don't pray outside of church unless you are with other's who are praying. Do you follow a certain sect/practice/branch or path in your faith. For example, if you are a pagan, do you practice wicca or some other path? Are you Orthodox Jew or Roman Catholic or Morman? Do you pray 5 times a day if you practice Islam? Do you follow the seasons of fasting of your faith? I know there are people here from all over the world, who practice all kinds of faiths. I want really honest answers. Even if you are an athiest, agnostic or apathetic. I would also be interested in why you are the way you are. Were you once very faithful, but found the people in that church/whatever to not "practicing what they were preaching?" Did you just drift away, perhaps finding more satisfaction in some other place then the faith you were brought up with. I know I'm asking a lot of questions, but I really want to know. Are you Christian/Jewish/Hindu/Shinto/Moslum/pagan? Pray tell!
14 people like this
42 responses
@tessah (6621)
• United States
12 Jan 09
main stream? no.. im pagan. prefer the term "heathen" honestly, because pagan is a xian term used for "godless" or "uncivilized" and im certainly neither of those descriptions. to be more specific.. im polytheistic spiritualist. raised a seventh adventist and taught to fear, hate, and seperate the races as is "gods way", i abandoned that religion at a rather young age.. and set out to find what spoke to me on a deeper personal level that didnt feel as "dirty". highly religious, extremely devout in my faith and practices, ive found my place.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
13 Jan 09
I have to say that some religions rather seem to enjoy doing that. Never have figured that out. At least the church I grew up with didn't do that. I'm kind of surprised, actually, that you managed to go so far, most of the people that grow up in those kinds of churches often are so frightened by their up bringing that they seldom leave some kind of Christian church. I think that's very interesting.
1 person likes this
@tessah (6621)
• United States
13 Jan 09
when i was about 11 or 12 years old.. i was in the 6th grade at any rate, just really "discovering" boys.. the pastors wife during the monthly potluck supper, casually asked me during small talk, who i liked. and i pointed out a boy across the room. a very nice boy named alex.. who was in my grade, went to my church, and i thought was just the sweetest looking boy id ever seen. he was perfect. this woman.. who being the pastor`s wife was an authority figure.. proceeded to ream me up one side and down the other about how "you can NOT like HIM!!! hes a SP|C!!" i went to my grandmother to ask her why i wasnt allowed to like this wonderful boy.. and she continued to explain to me about how it was a sin to "mix the races" and i was to stay with my own kind. twas there i lost all faith and hope in the church itself.. because at such a young age, i KNEW it was WRONG to hate someone because of the color of their skin, regardless of what i was being taught and drilled with at home. there began my search for something more condusive to the loving god i was hunting for. every other xian denomination i explored, attended services for, and learned about, were the same. preaching hatred and fear, racism and bigotry, either towards other nationalities, other religions, tween the sexes, you name it. so i kept searching and exploring.. and finally, had a spiritualistic experience that turned me into the direction ive continued on since. took me 15 years to get there (you can do ALOT of research in that amount of time LOL) , and the journey has been one incredible experience after another since. i love my life, i love the people in it,and im teaching my children what my own parents failed to do. to respect ALL, regardless of differences.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
14 Jan 09
I honestly never got that. the only time I every heard anything about races, was I was once asked in high school why I was hanging around with "those Mexicans." I just looked blankly at the person. I was like 15 or so when that happened. And since it wasn't in a church I didn't get turned off to religion then. I got discouraged in high school from the hypocricy I saw then. In my 20's I joined a church that I didn't find much and when I did see it, it wasn't from the clergy.
1 person likes this
@FDBrister (115)
• United States
11 Jan 09
Let me start by saying I am not considered the norm. I am a Christian, however I do not consider myself religious. Most would say that I am, though. I attend church twice a week. I pray daily more than once a day (no specific number of times). I read my Bible daily. I make a point to live a constant lifestyle that says I'm a follower of Christ. That means I treat others well, I live with integrity, and I do not condemn anyone. I'm not nice only to Christians; I'm nice to everyone (especially those who are not nice to me). I'm basically what's known as a sacrilegious Christian. I am the way I am because I believe in Christianity, I simply don't believe it is the way many are taught to believe it is. I believe that there is a God who truly loves humans; I believe He created us, is affectionate towards us, and believes us to be important.
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
11 Jan 09
I wouldn't call that sacriligious, I would call that doing your best to do what God wants you to do in this world.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Jan 09
According to many Christians' standards I'm sacrilegious because I don't promote the "you can't" and "you mustn't" and "you have to" that many people promote. I believe that religious practices are personal between someone and their God and that just because they serve differently than you, it down't mean that they're doing it wrong.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
11 Jan 09
I disagree. That you don't chose to try and convert people to your way of thinking isn't out of line for many branches of the Christian faith. There are just some that feel their church must go out and do that, or feel the calling to do so. It is like the Bible says, for some there are different gifts, some the gift of healing, some of speaking in tongues, etc, like in Timothy I, I think it is some where. It never says, like some branches seem to think, ever that you have to speak in tongues to be saved.... Mind you, we read that scripture to a Pentacostal and she just DIDN'T seem to hear it.
1 person likes this
@britt_200 (1227)
• United States
12 Jan 09
im not religious at all....
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
12 Jan 09
is there a reason? Were you brought up in a faith and left it?
1 person likes this
@britt_200 (1227)
• United States
12 Jan 09
i was raised catholic..and i went to catholic school for like 7 or 8 years...and i hated it so much...i had to go to church so much and i just hate religion all together...i believe i can pray and believe in god without going to church or doing all that stuff with the church
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
12 Jan 09
My roomie was raised by a Catholic mother, but as soon as she got away from her mom she refused to go to church. And she got away pretty young because she lived on campus at the blind school most of the year.
1 person likes this
@nanajanet (4436)
• United States
13 Jan 09
I have strong, deep faith and spirituality but I am not religious as I no longer practice any particular religion. I do take bits and pieces from many religions but they all come down to the same thing... do your best to respect others, treat them well, help them when needed, talk to your God (or whatever you call her, him or them), and that is that!
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
14 Jan 09
I find many people that were forced to some un-fiting brand of religion find themselves taking themselves into a faith of their own making.
1 person likes this
@nanajanet (4436)
• United States
14 Jan 09
I think we should learn about religions and then be allowed to choose one or none and not be raised in a religion, but that is just me.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
21 Jan 09
I took a course in college about world religions. My teacher had a like/hate relationship with me - well, what can I say? I had taken a philosphy class the summer before....
@suspenseful (40312)
• Canada
11 Jan 09
I go to cnurch twice on Sundays and I pray in the morning, the evening, and have grace at meals. I will pray whereever I am. I am not a very good person, and I sometimes fall short, like lose my temper, do not trust God as much as I should, but I consider myself a Christian. I am a Calvinist Christian in that I follow the teachings that God chooses HIS elect, the elect does not choose HIM and believe in infant baptism. And God will never allow HIS elect to be lost. I am a member of the Canadian Reformed church but Calvinists included Reformed and Presbyterian churches and we either use the Westminster Catechism or the Belgic Confession of Faith.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
11 Jan 09
But where does that leave free will? What is a person is doing his best to do as God has told him, but he's not one of the elect? See, that was my problem with the Presbyterians.....
2 people like this
• United States
12 Jan 09
My bible says that it is not God's will that ANY should perish. We are ALL meant to be His. He has not chosen to send anyone to hell; He gives us that choice to make for ourselves. Saying that God has chosen some and neglected others is like saying a parent has children so that they can choose to love some and hate the rest. God LOVES us. He loves EVERYONE; Christians and non-Christians. In fact, He loves everyone equally. "While we were yet sinners" He sent Christ to die for us. We have ALL sinned in one way or another, so He sent Christ for ALL sinners, EVERYONE. God loves us so much that He gave us free will. Once gain, it's like a parent... we could choose to put our children in a little bubble and never give them any freedom and force them to do everything we want them to, but no parent does that. We give our children choices in life out of love so that they can grow to become whoever they are meant to be. God left it up to us to choose the path we will take. The fact is that He made it oh so simple to get to heaven; the problem is that humans have complicated things. God made it so simple to get into heaven that we have deemed it too simple; human nature has taught us that nothing in life is simple. How fortunate that God does not operate under human nature. Baptism, as scripture explains it, is an outward showing of a person's commitment to Christ and repentance. That being the case, baptism is supposed to be done by choice. Babies have no choice, therefore can not choose to baptized. God has, in ALL things, given us a choice. How gracious is that?
3 people like this
@suspenseful (40312)
• Canada
12 Jan 09
Actually we are naturally inclined to go to hell. Even my precious granddaughter is starting to grab things from another little girl also eighteen months, so the only reason that there is not more damage is because God restrains evil. But I do not believe that everyone will go to heaven.
2 people like this
@camomom (7535)
• United States
18 Jan 09
I was raised Catholic and attended church on Sundays and/or Sunday school. I attended CCD. I was never baptized and never took first communion. I do not attend church now and I'm not sure what my beliefs are as far as God, Jesus or the Bible. I guess that's why I do not follow any organized religion.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
18 Jan 09
I call that kind of the culturally Christian. You are raised in the U.S. and know all the expectations of the U.S. and the U.S., despite some people's attempts, is still a predominately Christian nation. Not to say you have to be a practicing Christian to be culturally Christian. My dad was an athiest, but he was a very MORAL man and his morals were built by this Christian nation.
1 person likes this
@camomom (7535)
• United States
18 Jan 09
I never thought of it that way. I think I'm a pretty moral person. I guess that probably did come from things I learned in church and by being raised Catholic. I guess that makes sense.
2 people like this
• Regina, Saskatchewan
17 Jan 09
Wowza, for me this is really a complicated question(s). I was raised very Catholic,but well versed in my Celtic roots. Being the bright little human I am, I have asked questions about religion(s) ever since I could talk. So I would have to say, that I am more spiritual than 'religious', in that I have studied many, followed few, and only recently come to the realization that (probably due to my genetic roots) the Irish Celtic Tradition of Wicca is the practice that will/is most satisfying to my soul's yearnings. I'm still learning, still studying, but the path I've chosen has already 'put to rest' my lifelong overwhelming need to search. I'm not explaining this right, because it IS complicated, but I hope you get the idea.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
17 Jan 09
Actually, I did understand, mostly.
2 people like this
• Regina, Saskatchewan
17 Jan 09
Oh good, because I'm really too tired today to explain more. Maybe tomorrow....
2 people like this
@winterose (39893)
• Canada
13 Jan 09
I am christian, I do not go to church, I pray personally at home, my boyfriend is jewish, we attended synagogue a lot when I was able to move around now we do not even go there anymore, as I am almost always sick.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
14 Jan 09
It sounds like you are way more than just culturally Christian. I sometimes feel there better Christians who are "none-churched" than some "Sunday Christians."
2 people like this
@winterose (39893)
• Canada
14 Jan 09
I grew up in the church and I also went to several churches and studied the doctrines of many. I am more spiritualist today and I am happy with that.
2 people like this
@lvaldean (1612)
• United States
13 Jan 09
I attended a Unitarian Church when I attend anything at all. I have explored most of the Christian denominations to one extend or another more out of curiosity than anything else. I took First Communion as a Catholic but left the Church as a very young adult, as soon as I was able to consider and think for myself. One parent was one thing and the other was something else, thus Baptism and Communion. Now a days, well I am mostly Heathen or Pagan, depending on who you ask and what they are thinking at the time. I am a spiritualist. Deeply spiritual but non-religious. I don't believe in man and don't believe I require man to interpret my relationship to or with any deity. I don't practice anything, but live by tenets that are ethical by any standard.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
13 Jan 09
My father was athiest when I was growing up and yet very ethical and moral. I had a person tell me that an athiest couldn't be either. I pointed out to her that my father was both AND an atheist. Needless to say, her faith didn't win any points from me.
1 person likes this
@lvaldean (1612)
• United States
14 Jan 09
I think that is the problem most of the time. Those that are "religious" believe strongly that they hold the lock on morality and ethics. I am deeply ethical and deeply moral. I just happen to base both on standards that are not steeped in superstition or the idea that I will go to some flaming hell if I don't behave in a specific manner.
2 people like this
@ladybug565 (2217)
• United States
12 Jan 09
I am a christian and I try to follow my religion however I still make mistakes and I am still growing in my relationship with God. I wasnt raised religious actually my mother was not religious at all. I wasent baptised untill recently. I read the bible almost everyday and I pray at least once a day. I follow the ten commandments.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
12 Jan 09
Heck, everyone makes mistakes. Even the saints of the church went to confession, but they felt they were held to account for more things than others were. So, if you are just learning your faith, you are doing your best, and I very much doubt anyone could expect more than that from you.
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Jan 09
thanks. I do my best.
2 people like this
@dawnald (84201)
• Shingle Springs, California
12 Jan 09
My father is a non observant Jew, my mom was a non observant Christian and I wasn't raised in either religion. We do celebrate Christmas but only secularly.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
12 Jan 09
I have a friend who's family is what I call "culturally Jewish" they eat pork and don't go to temple. They celebrate Christmas, but not as a religious holiday too. I would probably call what you are kind of a "culturally christian" because the major overlay culture in the U.S. is dominately Christian, i.e. you put up Christmas trees, you have rabbits at Easter, etc.
2 people like this
@dawnald (84201)
• Shingle Springs, California
12 Jan 09
Basically true...
2 people like this
@blackbriar (9080)
• United States
12 Jan 09
I'm Catholic but I don't head to church or preach either. I prefer to just pray when and where I feel like praying and ain't noone gonna stop me. I was forced to go to church every sunday as well as Christmas and Easter. I hated it with a passion, which is prolly why I don't like going now.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
12 Jan 09
I'm not sure if you can really be a practicing Catholic without communion. I can see, and sure understand not liking to go to church because you were forced to, I was that way too.
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Jan 09
I had my communion, the whole nine yards. I haven't been to confession in 10yrs thou. The Lord above forgives me though. I know he is there watching over me.
2 people like this
@riyasam (16567)
• India
11 Jan 09
i am a christian but i try not to be a hypocrite .i believe action speaks louder than words.i donot beleive in degrading anyone but i do know what i stand for.actually, i am a firm bible believer and that all things will come to pass IN HIS TIME.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
11 Jan 09
That works for me? I joined a church for a while when I was a teen, but I found that church did some thing that were hypocritical. Not everyone, but more than enough that I became discouraged and left.
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Jan 09
I've been to Christian churches of many denominations. One thing held true... most people did not live up to what they said. Then about five years ago, I stumbled upon the church I attend now. In their daily lives, not just in church, I've seen these people live the life of Christianity. That's not to say they're perfect, they're far from it. But most of these people spend day in and day out SHOWING they are a Christian... it isn't just words.
2 people like this
@GreenMoo (11837)
17 Jan 09
I don't consider myself to be a religious person. I don't have strong beliefs, but I have no objection to accompanying family to services on occassions when I'm with them. I do think it's important for kids to learn about different world religions.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
17 Jan 09
So, kind of church attending culturally Christian
1 person likes this
@checapricorn (16049)
• United States
14 Jan 09
[i]Hi Elic, I am not very religious, I am a Roman Catholic. I tried to pray everyday to thank of all the blessings my family and I recieved and for the good health and I am also praying for guidance each day! I don't attend Church regularly! I believed that wherever I am, as long as I am sincere, I can talk to God anytime, anywhere! [/i]
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
18 Jan 09
Well, you are practicing a form of Christianity, but Catholisism kind of says you need to get to chruch and communion to be one. On the other hand, I have problems with the RC church (no, I was never one, but I did go to a RC high school for a couple of years) so I'm not one to say how you should be living your faith.
1 person likes this
@Harley009 (1420)
• India
13 Jan 09
[:)] I'm a kind of religious. I'm a Muslim, Just a normal Muslim. I have brought up in a way and I grown in a society of 'Cultural Muslims'. Later I learned myself and corrected my Islam. I took only the Islam and I left many things that came up in the name of Islam without any evidence. I used to pray five times a day, and weekly congregational prayer in Fridays. I fast during holy month of Ramadan. There had occasions I missed them though. I don't like myself to be classified under different branches of Islam. I used to learn our Holy Book - Quran and used to attend such classes sometimes. I was not drifted much, but as I said, I'm different from the culturally practiced Muslims in my living area. I know some people who changed their beliefs as well. My my local people used to say about me that I'm a diverted one. Many of those people's beliefs are just the things they heard from their fathers and fore-fathers, they just listen to some people known as leaders or some false Mullahs, they just don't try themselves to understand much. I have tried to understand about other religions like Christianity, Jewish, Hinduism, etc. But when ever I study those things it increased my faith in Islam! Islam is not just a religion started by prophet Mohammad, and not for a particular time or particular people or not originated in a particular span of human life. Islam is the guidelines of God revealed to mankind since the first human Adam itself. The message of Islam was completed by the Last prophet Prophet Mohammad. Islam's idea doesn't depends on a particular theory that are not applicable to a past or present or future generations. It's Idea is simple and universal. Islam teaches tribes, colors and races are only to identify and the most honorable in the sight of God is most pious. Alright.. what about yours? [:)] -Peace-
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
14 Jan 09
It sounds like you are trying to be a good Muslim. I would say that you should just keep doing what you are doing.
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Jan 09
I was brought up in the Christian faith and have continued in that faith into my adulthood. That doesn't mean that I think of myself without faults because of forgiveness. I have plenty of faults, but what sets Christianity apart from other religions is that the Holy Spirit convicts me of my sins or faults and when I repent I have an advocate, Jesus Christ, who stands before God and pleads my case for forgiveness. As the Bible teaches, "If we confess our sins He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness." While there have been times when I've wondered, "What if I'm wrong?" I've never abandoned the faith, nor have I ever been motivated to do so. God's basic message of love, sacrifice and redemption makes sense to me.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
14 Jan 09
Me too. It makes sense.
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45696)
12 Jan 09
I was brought up an Anglican. Married a Roman Catholic and don't attend either church. I try to live my life by generally Christian tenets. I work in an Anglican Cathedral. I respect all other faiths and religions and those people that are genuine followers of them, including those that fall within Paganism. Generally speaking, churches are full of hypocrites and I find something unpleasantly smug about folk that seem to think that attending church once a week makes them literally "Holier than Thou". I do believe in the possibility of a greater being. In order not to confuse, I'm happy to call it God.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
14 Jan 09
I would say that you are probably closest to the culturally Christian label. Even my roomie, who is a practicing "apathic" is none the less culturally Christian in the sense that she grew up in a family that was Christian... (actually her mom is Roman Catholic) and her father.... no idea.
1 person likes this
@Pose123 (21660)
• Canada
12 Jan 09
Hi ElicBxn, I was raised a Christian and followed a denomination of that religion for most of my life. I consider myself spiritual but not religious although I have read the Bible many times,since first reading it more then fifty years ago and continue to read it today. There is much that is good in it and I learn something new every time I read it but I do not of course, take it literally. To me the word religious speaks of rituals and certain beliefs that must be adhered to, and I am a free thinker. I have no intention of letting someone else tell me what I must or must not believe. Blessings.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
14 Jan 09
I'm not surprised that many people who are raised Christian are saying this. I think many people find hypocricy in churches and feel that even if they do go to a church, they aren't going to be told how to believe.
1 person likes this
@Lindery (853)
• Latvia
12 Jan 09
I am not religious but I don't deny religious existence. I come from ex-soviet place (Latvia) and 15-20 years ago God and all other icons of the planet was illegal to believe in. It's because our God was Lenin and his ideology. I don't go to a church, and I don't pray before a dinner. But I am sure I collapse emotionally when there are trouble overtaking me or my family, maybe even I pray... in my own way.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
12 Jan 09
That is so interesting. I wonder who you find yourself praying to since your God was replaced. I'm so nosy aren't I?
1 person likes this