Do we speak the same language?

@GreenMoo (11836)
May 1, 2013 12:10pm CST
We regularly have visitors here from around the world, and we were laughing earlier about the different ways that people will say the same thing. If I'm at the table and want the salt, for instance, I'll say 'please could you pass the salt'. Other examples of things that guests have said when wanting the same thing have been 'Can I see the salt?' (yes, it's right there, see?), 'Can you dangle me the salt?' (can I what?) and, the classic, 'Can I f*** with the salt?' (most certainly, but not at the dinner table and please buy your own). All the above examples were Americans by the way, which is really funny as we both speak English as a first language. Do you say any of those things? Can you think of other examples of how we might express ourselves differently?
2 people like this
8 responses
@stary1 (6614)
• United States
1 May 13
GreenMoo LOL I assumed those were all from non-Americans, I have never heard of any of them. Reminds me of the discussion some years back that we should have one international language. Then everyone would just have to learn their own plus one other to be able to communicate with the world..too bad that didn't work out...
@dagami (1162)
• Rome, Italy
1 May 13
All the above examples were Americans by the way, which is really funny as we both speak English as a first language. i have learned english since my first day in school. i consider this my second language. you're right, stary. we should try our best to learn this so we can communicate with the world. some people find english hard to learn because it is not spoken outside of the english classrooms in their country. in the philippines, english films are shown in their original language. nobody bothers to dub or put subtitles. our laws are also written in english. it is very easy for an english speaking foreigner to go around because he will always find someone to talk with there. when i migrated here to italy ten years ago, i was expecting to be able to communicate in english with the italians. sad to say, this isn't the case here. they learn english in school but they don't use it outside of the classroom so they soon forget it. i had to learn italian fast and i'm glad i did.
@GreenMoo (11836)
1 May 13
We had a Filipino group here for a course last year and I was astonished at how good their language skills were.
@katsmeow1213 (28878)
• United States
1 May 13
I've never heard anyone ask to dangle with the salt.. and the one who swears has some awful manners! I've asked to "see" the salt, and sometimes I might say "toss me the salt" when I don't literally mean to toss it of course.
@GreenMoo (11836)
1 May 13
Dangling the salt really is a weird one. That was a guy from Arizona.
• United States
1 May 13
Well you know even here in the States everyone talks differently, and I don't just mean accents, although those are fun too! We seem to be the only area in the world that says "soda" while most other people call it "pop". I found that one weird. I'm also called a "Yank" or "Yankee" (and they don't mean the baseball team) by not only Canadians, but also by those down south. I'm not sure if those out west call us Yanks or not.. I'd have to ask someone. And I think each area of the world or even just our country has their own weird little sayings. I was reading some books that were set in Maine and one of their sayings for a nice day was a "Fat" day, which I'd never heard until I read the book.. but I think people in Maine might actually say that. Someone from Florida told me they call nice days Tourist days or something like that.. I forget now.
@Orson_Kart (5325)
• United Kingdom
1 May 13
In days of yore I used to apply salt with gay abandon. Now, due to the warnings of over use, I like merely to flirt with it. However, when it comes to chips, I cannot help but sprinkle liberally. I just hope I haven't HAD my chips by having my chips. If you know what I mean?
@GreenMoo (11836)
1 May 13
Heavens! What do you do with your vinegar?
1 person likes this
• United Kingdom
1 May 13
Vinegar? If you knew me better, then you'd know I like to add a bit of sauce to everything!
@elitess (5071)
• Ipswich, England
1 May 13
Are you sure those were not jokes ? They can't have been from people who know English. May I have the salt please ? Can you please pass the salt ? Would you be a dear and hand me the salt ? and various other polite, logical questions would come from me in that context :) Oh, English is the second language for me.
@GreenMoo (11836)
1 May 13
Really, they're all true. And all English speaking Americans.
@dawnald (84260)
• Shingle Springs, California
1 May 13
None of the above....
@GreenMoo (11836)
1 May 13
So we both speak English then!
@writersedge (22577)
• United States
4 May 13
Actually, I've been corrected many times when I was in Europe. "No, you don't speak English, you speak American." My husband says that Americans haven't spoken English in years. The one that wanted to f with the salt. Rude, impolite and would have been told to leave the table until he was civilized. I assume that was a very poor attempt at humor.
@jillhill (37371)
• United States
3 May 13
One of the things I find interesting is some people fill up with gas.....and some put gas on? If you are pumping gas into a gas tank how can that be putting it on? On what...? Aren't you putting it into a gas tank?
@cupkitties (7439)
• United States
2 May 13
"Can I f*** with the salt?"? That seems like something I often hear some of the younger ones say about people they like . "I f*** with Bob. Bob is awesome." So this person wants to be friends with your salt? Weird.