Need help with Vegan, high protein recipes?

@jennybianca (12918)
Australia
October 31, 2007 10:38pm CST
If you are a vegan, I presume that you make an effort to get a lot of protein from vegan sources. How do you do this? Do you know some good soy flour recipes, as soy is high in protein? My daughter has to eat about 60 grams of protein each day, which is very difficult. She doesn't like exotic, weird things.
1 person likes this
10 responses
• United States
1 Nov 07
We eat a lot of tofu. It's great scrambled like eggs, and we use nutritional yeast instead of cheese in a lot of dishes. We also eat nut butters like peanut, cashew, almond, and all beans have a good bit of protein, as do lentils.
@jennybianca (12918)
• Australia
1 Nov 07
I give her nuts, especially cashews. I don't think sdhe will take to tofu yet. I am also having trouble getting her to eat beans.
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@deebomb (15347)
• United States
16 Dec 07
Here is a good site that tells how much protein is in each food. You have to scroll down to get to the chart. Hope it will help. I love this site because it give what each food will help with different desieases as well as what is in each food. http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=92#foodsources
@jennybianca (12918)
• Australia
17 Dec 07
This site is excellent. I am looking at it now. Thanks very much.
@deebomb (15347)
• United States
18 Dec 07
Has this site helped you with the protein foods you daughter needs and will eat. By the way how old is your daughter?
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@jennybianca (12918)
• Australia
25 Dec 07
My daughter is 14 years. She decided to become vegan
@edigital (2711)
• United States
13 Apr 08
For high protein vegan recipes you can visit some website. But you can try for this item:- High Protein Granola * 3 cups wheat germ * 2 cups rolled oats * 1 cup wheat bran * 1 cup sesame seeds * 1/2 cup flour * 1/4 cup oil * 1 cup raisins * Optional: pumpkin seeds, toasted soy nuts, chopped dried fruits Preheat oven to 300°F. Toast seeds lightly, stirring and watching that they do not burn. Remove seeds and mix all other ingredients together except for the raisins and continue to toast for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add seeds and raisins. Allow to cool and store in a covered container in the refrigerator. For more items please visit:- www.vegan-food.net/recipe/116/High-Protein-Quinoa-Patties www.protein.com/soyproteinrecipes/breakfast.html vegweb.com/index.php?topic=9904 solae.com/soyproteinrecipes/recipes/ariahighproteinapplepancakes.jsp
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@jennybianca (12918)
• Australia
14 Apr 08
These are excellent sites. Thank you very much. I like this homemade recipe, & I am fairly sure my daughter would eat it too.Coupled with milk, this could provide a very high protein breakfast.
• India
14 Mar 08
Soybean is a good Protein source. But do not over do it as the long term benefits are still not known. Have it in moderation. Try Mushrooms, Broccoli & Spinach. Nuts are wonderful protein sources. The other good sources are legumes like peas. Lentils are great. Grains like Corn & wheat are good. A general vegan diet will give you enough proteins. But one consumes an extra bit of Carbohydrates doing that . So cut down the direct carbohydrates like rice, potatoes & sugars. Also try Pasta made from high quality Durum wheat. Drink plenty of water & Exercise In your daughters case as she has to consume 60 gms of protein divide her diet into 6 meals. Very advisable to have Papaya or Pineapple fruit just before a meal as it will help to digest the proteins. Papaya & Pineapple has digestive enzymes which are not naturally produced by the body.
@jennybianca (12918)
• Australia
14 Mar 08
This is excellent advice. My daughter is very fussy, but some of these she will eat such as nut, corn & wheat. I only buy high quality bread (wholemeal/multigrain). I will check out the pasta situation & make sure I am buying the best quality possible. I want to her interested in lentils, especially red lentils.
24 Dec 07
Texturized Vegetable Protein. This stuff is awesome and you can find it in any health food store, and I've even been seeing it in the natural food sections in regular grocery stores. You can add it to anything, spaghetti, chili, any soup, it basically just needs to be boiled. A lot of people make it with lentils, beans, any kind of legume...If you throw it in ten minutes before your beans are done it'll be ready to eat right off. I like to put it in early when making chilli because the longer it sits, the more flavor it absorbs. The amount tvp it takes to make a serving is a little less than an ounce, and in that ounce you get 12 grams of protein (that's a buttload) plus 594mg of potassium...it also has 15% of your daily Iron needs and 8% of calcium. There's a lot more, I just don't like sounding like a nutrition fact table? :) It's worth buying and a little goes a long way.
@jennybianca (12918)
• Australia
25 Dec 07
Great, this sounds well worth me pursuing. Thanks.
• United States
10 Dec 07
I'm going to add you as a friend, because I'm actually in the process right now of putting all of my vegan and vegetarian recipes up here now, so you can check them. There's a lot of protein in them, with some having as much as 22g of protein, so I hope some of them can help you!
@jennybianca (12918)
• Australia
11 Dec 07
Great. I want you as a friend. Where are all these vegan & vegetarian recipes going to be? On your My Lot homepage, or a blog?
@Postrock (273)
• Italy
25 Nov 07
I really love lentils. But i'm afraid that those dont have all the amminoacids that you need to make noble proteins. I think you have to combine different foods to get noble proteins from foods that dont come from animals. one example i think is pasta + beans, it makes for a good noble protein income.
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@jennybianca (12918)
• Australia
26 Nov 07
Okay, thanks, that is handy to know. I could think up a nice lentil/pasta recipe.
@Molinda (77)
• China
1 Nov 07
As far as i know,teh soy is high in protein.but you can't eat too much.because one of my friend eat the soy every day,he think the soy is a health product .but after two months,he is hospitalize.because his uric acid is more than usual.so you can get lot of protein from soy,but don't eat too much.
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@jennybianca (12918)
• Australia
2 Nov 07
I have heard befopre that there are side effects from too much soy. That's interesting. Thank you for this info.
@KarenO52 (2951)
• United States
1 Nov 07
I'm not a vegan, but I do like vegetables a lot, and often fix meatless meals just because I like them. I sometimes add ground nuts to vegetable casseroles to provide protein. I make bean burritos loaded with goodies like shredded cheese, salsa, and guacamole. I've never tried to make anything with soy flour, but I have made things with tofu, which is very good, and a good source of protein. I make a spicy stir-fry with it.
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@jennybianca (12918)
• Australia
2 Nov 07
That's a good idea of adding ground nuts to vege casseroles. Thanks.
• India
1 Nov 07
We are a vegetarian family and I am also always on a look out for protein rich recipes to cook at home. I don't know if you are aware of lentils, but they are very rich in protein and can be cooked easily too. Beans like Garbanzo, kidney or black beans are also very nutritious. Tofu which has soy is very good for health. You can cook tofu just like any other vegetable. Cook it in a gravy or simply add sauces and make it tasty.
@jennybianca (12918)
• Australia
1 Nov 07
I love lentils myself, especially red lentils. I have not yet been able to convince my daughter to try lentils. Maybe if I mix them with rice or potato?