The furnace fan

@Trace86 (5033)
United States
January 21, 2008 2:17pm CST
I was listening to the radio earlier this week and they were discussing that it is a good idea to set the fan on the furnace to "on" instead of "auto". That it will recirculate the air and keep the house a more even temperature. I would think this would waste more energy and tire out the furnace. What do you think? Is it a good idea or not?
2 people like this
4 responses
@drannhh (15240)
• United States
21 Jan 08
Sounds cockamamie to me, but that may be because I hate overcirculating air inside a home. It always feels cold to me when a fan is on and I don't care for the constant noise either. I am pretty sure Nikola Tesla, who invented AC power, would agree on the noise. He had very sensative hearing, too. This sounds as ridiculous as the injunctive to keep the temperature at 68F. I like it 80 in the summer and what I save on air conditioning in summer I am entitled to spend on heat in the winter. It doesn't take much electricity to keep warm where we live, though, as it is the desert.
2 people like this
@stephcjh (32327)
• United States
21 Jan 08
Yeah. That sounds like it could run up the energy bill. I am on naturla gas and it is outragious. It has been very cold recently. The fan may run off of electric so it may help us, but I'm not sure.
@Sillychick (3279)
• United States
21 Jan 08
I see what you mean about using more energy by having the fan on, but I think the trade off is worth it. Having the fan on circulates the air more, as you said, and keeps a more even temperature. That means that the work the furnace is doing when it is running is more effiecently heating your house. Instead of the furnace coming on every 20 minutes, it may only need to come on every hour, and you are going to be just as warm across the room as you are right next to the vents. That means you could lower your thermostat a couple of degrees and still be comfortable. I also think a couple of ceiling fans throughout the house are a good idea, especially for high ceilings. Since heat rises, they help to circulate the air and keep it feeling more comfortable.
2 people like this
@Stephanie5 (2947)
• United States
21 Jan 08
I'm not sure either way. I guess all I can suggest is that you try it for a month and see what your bill says. I might even give it a shot because my gas bill was almost $300. And it's always cold in here. Sucks to pay all that money and still be freaking cold! Let me know what you figure out. And if I try it, I'll let you know too! I'll also keep an eye on the discussion to see if someone else says they've done it and it was a good idea. Thanks!