The Plight of Epileptics

@clrumfelt (5424)
United States
May 9, 2008 8:12am CST
Epilepey is in modern times still somewhat of a mysterious neurological condition to which there is still a stigma attached. People with epilepsy may have uncontrolled, unpredictable seizures or convulsions. Sometimes the seizures can becontrolled through medications or surgery but often there is no known cause for them and the available mediations and surgeries don't work. Sometimes, if a seizure can't be produced in a clinical setting, a doctor will question a victim's claim and not believe they are really having them. Here is an account related to me by a 22-year-old seizure patient: He was having severe grand mal seizures. They were unpredictable and had not been clinically diagnosed in a medical setting. This young man could not drive or work because of his disorder. The doctors would not certify his condition. He applied for benefits from a government agency but was denied because his doctor would not certify that he was having the seizures. Even so, he kept applying because he couldn't work and needed the benefits to take care of his family. One day as he was in the waiting room waiting to see his caseworker he had a full blown seizure. After that the agency gave his family financial help, but I think it is a shame he had to go through so much in order to be believed and helped. How do you view epilepsy? Do you feel that in modern times there is still a stigma attached to this disease?
1 response
@lilybug (21148)
• United States
27 Aug 08
I have only ever known 1 person with epilepsy. He was a kid in my school. I went to school with him for 10 years. I only ever saw him have a seizure once. We were in gym class in 3rd grade and we were running. All of the sudden he stopped and was kind of running in place. We all laughed about it at the time. None of us had ever seen anything like it before. He was pretty embarrasses afterwards. He did not have the flop on the floor seizures that some people have. I think society is getting better about people with disorders, but there is still a long way to go.
1 person likes this
@clrumfelt (5424)
• United States
27 Aug 08
I agree. My seizures were not intrusive into my life until I was an adult and they started getting a little worse. Mine are called absence seizures and I always thought it was vertigo attacks because all I felt was a sense of dizziness at the time they happened. When they got worse I was having periods of blackouts when I didn't know what I was doing. I would suddenly drop things and I shouldn't have been driving. I think any seizure patient who doesn't have the grand mal kind is fortunate.