How do you Vote?

United States
September 10, 2008 4:47pm CST
Do you ride the party lines or do you waiver your position depending upon the politicians running? If you have been a party member, have you ever changed positions? I would consider myself a party line type of person but I am wondering what it would take for me to vote differently? Something good to consider I think.
1 person likes this
6 responses
@pmenard (139)
10 Sep 08
I do typically vote democrat. I do live in a hugely Democratic state, so I do vote for the Green Party sometimes (depending on the candidate). I would love to see them become a more prominent party. I think that our country suffers from the limitation of two parties.
2 people like this
• United States
11 Sep 08
Isn't that interesting how there are states that usually vote one way over another? It seems location has a lot to do with politics.
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@pmenard (139)
12 Sep 08
It's true. The majority of the states can be called for a party before a candidate is announced.
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@spalladino (17925)
• United States
10 Sep 08
My voting history has never been based on party loyalty, however, I have always been fairly conservative. I am more interested in the person who will be in the Oval office, not what party he belongs to, which is why I've had some problems with this election. It's been a close race but the recent VP picks and the experience, beliefs and history they bring with them has actually caused me to lean in a different direction. There are many issues that are important to me that Palin and I are on opposite sides of the fence on and, with her, there is no middle ground. I think there many women who share my feelings and concerns.
2 people like this
• United States
11 Sep 08
I have never found a candidate that I agree with fully. There is always give and take. I vote for the one I agree with the most. I have even voted for someone who holds strong views against my beliefs because in the end, they had more favorable total beliefs. I don't have one belief that out weighs others.
10 Sep 08
Well things are a little different, here in the UK, though not so much so. Labour and Conservative are our main parties, equivalent to your Democrats and Republicans. What is a bit different, is that there is a bit wider choice, if you don't want to vote for the two biggest parties. Our third choice is Liberal Democrats, who are a little indefinable: generally, depending in what area their candidate is in, their man (or woman) will just waiver to the main opinion - more than Lab or Con! I generally go for Green, though it doesn't mean I agree with everything they say and sometimes think they are too, too much soft and woolly! Over my lifetime have voted Tory, Lib Dem and Green. So am not a lifetime anything!
• United States
11 Sep 08
Thanks for the education. I had heard of your party system but it has been a while. I am wondering how important our politics are to your news reporting?
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Sep 08
Wow, it's interesting what gets reported. The lipstick on a pig is such a silly part of our news I am sorry to hear it made such wide coverage. I don't buy into it's importance and I don't think it was said as an insult.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Sep 08
I vote along party lines. I've been with the same party since the beginning and I would never switch, no matter what.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Sep 08
In many ways I agree with you. I have strong alliances with what my party stands for even if I don't agree with everything or everyone running in my party.
@ZephyrSun (7385)
• United States
10 Sep 08
I vote the person not the party. I usually vote Democratic but I have voted Republican when I haven't like the other one.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Sep 08
Thanks for your comment. As I expressed in the above comment, I'd like to say I look at the person and I do. But, I find that I have stayed true to one party so I judge myself a party line person based on my voting record.
@cream97 (29166)
• United States
10 Sep 08
Well, I hardly do vote. But, I will vote this year.. I have always been an Democrat, and I don't think that I am planning on changing that anytime soon.. I believe that I will feel strange just by being an Republican...
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Sep 08
Can I ask why you typically don't vote? I don't think I have ever missed a presidential election. I am not sure how I'd feel about that. Can you give me insight? Thanks.
1 person likes this