Foreign words and strange places in a novel

@suspenseful (40316)
Canada
October 19, 2008 12:28pm CST
I am writing a novel where the characters speak a different language then the hero and to emphasize that the character is speaking Latin, for instance, I will have him speak the Latin word for the item rather than the English word. I have been underlining (yes I know that when the book is published, these will appear in italics, so you don't have to tell me. ) the word or phrases the first few times, but I was wondering whether I should continue these throughout the novel? Also what about names I made up for the towns, provinces, and or countries, should these be underlined or just typed out in the regular font?
4 responses
@deebomb (15322)
• United States
19 Oct 08
First I admire you for writing a book. I know it has to be a big undertaking and a lot of discipline. It seems to me that I remember That the foreign words were only in italics only the first time they were used. I'm not sure. Besides do what you think is best because they will probably send it back to be redone any way. You should read "The Novel" by James Michener it is about a man writing a novel and his having to correct manuscripts.
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
19 Oct 08
I was thinking of keeping the foreign words unlined (in italics in the finished book) as someone might read the last few chapters.
1 person likes this
@deebomb (15322)
• United States
20 Oct 08
That would be a good idea. a glossary at the end. Then if the reader wants they can refer back to them.
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@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
20 Oct 08
I sort of like the way that they did it in the movies, where the people were talking in the foreign language and then slipped into English. A glossary might work, but then they would lose the flow of the novel because they had to go to each word and I cannot write "Je suis Jacques Duval" and in brackets put "I am Jack Duval," after each foreign phrase. It also slows down the novel.
@ElicBxn (60894)
• United States
19 Oct 08
Names should not be underlined
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@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
19 Oct 08
So if I make up a town called Lursery on the planet Zion, I do not have the publisher put them in Italics.
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@ElicBxn (60894)
• United States
19 Oct 08
Nope. check out other books in the genre, you won't see it
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@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
20 Oct 08
I can do that.
1 person likes this
@gtargirl (5385)
• United States
23 Oct 08
Nothing should be underlined or in italics (unless you're quoting something from another book), as far as I know. But then again it all depends on your publisher. They have their own rules. I do think you have to be consistent in whatever you do. So keep everything regular font.
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@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
24 Oct 08
You have to underline foreign words that are not that commonly use. But I guess made up cities are all right. And I will have to find out about made up poems or letters to the hero, etc.
@checapricorn (16066)
• United States
19 Oct 08
[i]Hello suspenseful, I haven't tried writing a novel but in my own idea, I guess it is better to continue doing that at the end of the novel but for places, for me it's not necessary to underline it... ANyway, if I am reading that novel and I have no idea about Latin, maybe I love to have some translation! [/i]
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@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
19 Oct 08
I prefer doing that, but sometimes I think everyone knows what the word means and I have to go back and underline them again.