Does declawing your cat hurt him?

United States
October 21, 2008 9:20pm CST
I was thinking about getting it done at first, but I don't want to make him sad because he does like to claw stuff. I was just wondering if it hurts them. Have you ever had your cat declawed? Or seen how one reacted to it?
2 people like this
11 responses
@Loverbear (4929)
• United States
22 Oct 08
Some people claim that declawing a cat doesn't hurt them, but with the one and only cat that I had declawed it was obvious that it hurt and his paws were very sensitive afterwards. They have come out with claw covers that you glue on their claws and it keeps them from ruining furniture and drapes from clawing. One other point about declawing a cat is that if they get outside they have no way to defend themselves. Neutering isn't painful to the cat. In fact, you will find a big difference in your cat's behavior. He will become a more docile and loving animal and will be non responsive if there is a female in heat in your area. Also, it lengthens a cat's life by being neutered. They don't go through the frustration, or attempt to get out to find a female. Also, it keeps them from roaming the streets and chancing getting run over. Neutering also helps prevent testicular cancer in the male. I just had my two male Siamese neutered a couple of months ago and they have changed so much. They sprayed on everything, and now they only use the litter box. They have violent fights between each other and that has stopped. They now crawl up in my lap and snooze for as long as I allow them to sleep. They are more contented and less frustrated. Beside the fact that neutering the cat will help eliminate the over population that happens in the feline world. I don't remember how many kittens that can come from one un neutered male and unspayed female can ultimately produce in the period of five years, but it is in the 10's of thousands! So many of those off spring end up in shelters and end up being put to sleep because the owners didn't bother to get them de-sexed so that they can't reproduce. Please, do get your boy neutered. You won't be sorry that you did. He will have minor pain from the incisions, but that passes quickly and soon he will be back up on his paws and will be a much happier little boy.
2 people like this
• United States
22 Oct 08
Thank you for such a nice, detailed response. I will definitely get my cat neutered. It would be great to have him be nice more often.
• Philippines
22 Oct 08
I don't think I can allow my cat to undergo a declawing procedure. I can't see my cat get hurt, it will make me cry before my cat yawn for help.
2 people like this
@JoyfulOne (6243)
• United States
22 Oct 08
I have 2 indoor cats and they are both de-clawed on the front. My daughter is a veterinarian, and I watched her do the proceedure. The cats were NOT in pain during it, and their front feet were both bandaged afterwards. They didn't seem to have any pain at all. The bandages seemed to cause them more concern, and they still walked around right afterwards just like nothing was bothering them. Would I do it again? Yes! Instead of having ruined furniture and curtains, I don't have to replace anything any more. I look at it this way....when I had to have a couple of my own toenails removed a few years back, I did not feel pain while going through the proceedure (neither did my cats.) And I was bandaged and still was able to walk on my feet right afterwards. IE: it was no great pain for me. If I felt it was inhumane to do this to my cats, then why would I let a people Dr do it to my feet?! That's just how I see it lol. I left my cats clawed on their back feet, and they still catch an occasional mouse should one get into the house in the fall. One of my barn cats is a rescue cat, and it's declawed on the front too (she came that way.) She hunts, crawls trees, and is just your normal barn kitty.
1 person likes this
@JoyfulOne (6243)
• United States
23 Oct 08
Thank you for your comments. However, on mylot, we are entitled to our own opinions without being flamed or being personally attacked for them. This is a discussion group and rudeness to other members is never necessary in an adult conversation. In other words, while it's ok to disagree, it is never ok to call people names or put them down because their opinions and comments do not agree or match with yours. A valid point can always be made without resorting to name calling. Valid viewpoint attack is ok, but personal attacks are not! Have a nice day.
• United States
12 Nov 08
That's just plain ignorant.
• United States
12 Nov 08
JoyfulOne, I want to be clear on my comment earlier. For instance, I think that if you had a person in the household who developed immune deficiency of some sort, and they were living with the animal, that it would be okay to consider declawing in order to preserve the pet-owner bond. If you can't handle the risk or getting scratched or having your furniture being 'ruined' then you probably are not a good candidate to be a cat owner. I don't understand why people choose to own animals that they can't deal with. Just FYI, here is a list of countries that have evolved beyond the declawing POV.
@momiecat (997)
• United States
22 Oct 08
Do not declaw a cat! It is cruel; it hurts a cat. There can be complications, infections, etc. Nature made a cat with claws to protect itself, so it can climb and get away from other animals that may attack it. Declawing a cat just to protect furniture is selfish. If you value items more than caring about the cats themselves, then you should not have a cat. If you fear a cat scratching you, then you should not have a cat. It is definitely not natural and cruel to do so. If you are even thinking about it, find the cat a better home where he/she can keep what nature has given him/her without suffering through a painful surgery and recuperation time. These are facts. I am not trying to be mean.
• United States
22 Oct 08
I was just thinking about it because he is mean. We are trying to be nice to him so that he won't bite and scratch. I mean, he is just playing, but he plays too rough and he don't know it. He waits at the door and attacks our feet when we walk by. But I won't declaw him. I'm scared that he will miss them and there is no way to give him his claws back. What about neutering? Is there anything wrong with that?
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (59009)
• United States
22 Oct 08
it is like having the last knuckle on your finger cut off, and then not given anything for pain it is an amputation, and it also changes the way the cat walks on their feet cats walk on their tiptoes and if you cut off their claws, you also damage the way they walk and can cause arthritus in their feet later it is a cruel thing to do because you are worried about your furniture the only time it should be done is if there's a medical reason (for example, my roommate is blind and she couldn't see to trim a former cat's nails and she got some nails that grew around and into her toe pads - another cat would go crazy and attack people and one of the roommates was on blood thinners at the time so we decided to declaw him before he injured her - he had already sent 2 of us to the hospital before that by attacking us
1 person likes this
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
22 Oct 08
I have not and will not declaw any of my cats. I want them to be able to defend themselves. They are more important to me than the furniture.
1 person likes this
@stormyz (23)
• United States
22 Oct 08
I wouldn't have my cats declawed, the top part of their toes are cut off not just the claw. It's like cutting your finger off at the top knuckle to keep your finger nails from growing.
1 person likes this
• United States
26 Dec 08
I have never seen the act or recovery of cats being declawed, but I adopted the sweetest cat Ive ever known from my local SPCA, where I volunteered during highschool. She's an Egyptian Mau I named Bast, Lol.. I even made her a myspace page, www.myspace.com/maubastet Anyway!!! She was declawed, on all four paws, and the poor baby had for whatever reason, ended up at the SPCA. I have no idea why, she's the best pet I have ever had. Very smart cat! Unfortunetly, and not without a big fight, my stepdad made her an outdoor cat. He doesn't like cats that much and argued that the hair gave him allergies which i believe is complete BS, but I have no choice. Bast took it extremely well though. She is very smart and never wonders off. I've had her since 2004 and sh'e has been perfectly fine. Of course though I still sneak her inside through my window all the time, and find any excuse to keep her inside, shes my best friend!!! I think it's a matter of finding a very good doctor who knows what they are doing. If I was going to do this with my kitty, I would do research!! Contact a list of vets who declaw and visit with them all. I know at my vet she has people who always send picture of their pets saying how great a vet she is, which makes me feel alot better taking my pet to her. So find the most friendly, understanding, and credited vet you can.. and really pamper your kitty when she gets home from surgery! Just like you would a person when they come home from the hospital. Make everything like food and water and toys closely available. When my Bast was spayed I moved all her stuff into my bedroom and made her a super comfy bed next to my bed and left my tv on Animal Planet all day. I'd even carry her to her litter box a few times throughout the day. But thats just me, I dont just have a pet so I can control another beings life.. My pet is a member of my family and my closest friend, and I treat her as such. Katy.
• United States
12 Nov 08
Kmarie, cats are intelligent and trainable. You will regret declawing the cat. Even if your cat is hunting you when you come around the corner, it's because there's something that the cat needs from you. You can make 'play time' with the kitty, so that you establish an appropriate time to play with a cat toy, or object. Read Cat. vs. Cat, it's a little obsessive, but has some great insights into behavioral modification. You will not only be severing their digits, but you'll be severing their independence. Johnny
22 Oct 08
Please, do not declaw your cat. The clinic where I take my cats DOES NOT, WILL NOT declaw cats. You don't mention if your cat is indoor-outdoor. Claws are the cat's protection from other cats, racoons, dogs, and other potential dangers outside. They use their claws to scratch itches, whether or not you use flea control. It's a very painful situation for cats and they have to be anesthesized, which is the most expensive part of a vet bill. How would you feel if your nails were taken out? Cats scratch things. I don't care if they scratch my furniture...I chose to have cats and they scratch. Also, get a scratching post if you don't already have one. You can also purchase a product called No Scratch for Cats that you spray on the furniture. That will deter them a bit. But, if you don't want your cat to scratch, then perhaps you should give the cat to a more loving person. So, just quit "thinking about getting it done," okay!
@fifileigh (3622)
• United States
22 Oct 08
my late cat was de-clawed. she was ok. she was indoor all the time and spoiled indoor cat. but if you declaw him, dont let him outside. he wont be able to survive outdoors and might get in danger. my current cat is not declawed, and he has lots of scratch boards and posts that he enjoys playing with. he is indoor too. they were happy either way as spoiled indoor cats.