High Cost of Education Who is to blame

@bobmnu (8160)
United States
February 3, 2009 12:26pm CST
As I get ready to pay my sons college Bill for the second semester I am shocked by the cost. When I think back to my college cost and wonder what happened and why does it cost so much. I did a little research and could find tuition data for Wisconsin Schools going back ten years. I did a calculation using the Bureau of Labor Statics inflation calculator and found that the cost of my sons college in 1998 was $5992 per year. Now it is $10,308 per year. Inflation for the 10 years was 30% yet the college costs went up 72%. I asked myself what caused college to go up over twice the rate of inflation. One answer is the Government Pell Grant is up 86% in the last 10 years. If you re making over $60,000 a year you are facing ever higher college costs for your children and you are the ones paying the full price of college PLUS your are paying the majority of taxes. The people who pay no taxes get the highest College Aid for their children and get to elect the Representatives who make the laws. Remember 40% of the Adult population pays no income taxes. Congress seems to be the force behind the rising college cost because they are providing an incentive to colleges to increase the costs to get more federal money. I will ask one of my usual questions Where in the Constitution does Congress have the right to take my money and give it to someone else to pay for their education?
2 responses
@spalladino (17925)
• United States
3 Feb 09
I don't have an answer to your question, bob, but I do have a question for you. Do you feel that a college education should only be available for those who can afford it? I worked at a community college for 8 years. Many of our students came from lower income families and were the first generation to attend college so, obviously, they wouldn't have been able to be there without federal assistance. A college education...even at the community college level...is a ticket out of poverty for many young people who have the desire and the drive to achieve their goals. I don't believe it's wrong to assist them. I also don't believe that colleges raise the cost of tuition in order to receive more federal money. I found the opposite to be true. The amount of the Pell Grant is not set by the colleges so they're forced to keep tuition costs in line with the amount of the grant. It makes no sense to charge X amount for 12 credits if the grant won't cover it. That decreases the student population and no college wants that.
@bobmnu (8160)
• United States
4 Feb 09
I have spent part of my career working at the college level(and most of it working at the High School Level) and in one class I taught there were 10 boys from inner city Detroit and they had been given an "Athletic Scholarship"(which were grants and loans) to attend college. Only one of the students was not on probation and was not taking the remedial High School English and Math courses. By Thanksgiving of their first semester only three boys returned to college. When I asked the one fellow he told me they did not have any money left from their "Scholarship". By the end of the first year only one student remained. He was the only one who met the minimum requirements for college entry. The government set guidelines and quotas on admitting minorities and colleges were hard pressed to find qualified minorities, so they were taking anyone who was even close at a cost of $4,000 to $6,000 per student. It would have been better for the government to stay out and encourage these students to enter a two year program or a technical school program where they could be successful and then try the 4 year school, with credit for courses taken. I am all for helping students who need help, but why should I fund my children's education and then fund the education of students who we know from the start are not going to make it. This is done just because they are poor? I have seen too many qualified students turned down because they had to make room for "disadvantaged students". I would like to see Federal aid based on the financial hardship, plus grades and the potential of the student. One Senator who spoke out against increasing Student Aid pointed to the fact that 20% of the students receiving Federal money were not passing a single course. I forget how many millions of dollars could be save if to receive a Federal Grant you had to be passing your course work. In Wisconsin we have 2 year campus but they all want to be 4 year institutions. We have Technical Colleges that are becoming more like colleges and the High Schools are eliminating vocational programs in favor of College prep courses. We have a great Education institution but the system needs to be overhauled and students need to be guided into careers and areas that will best meet their goals and ability. Why send a student into a situation where you know they will fail. The beauty of the American system is that you can always change and go to college. We just had two ladies featured in the paper who completed their BS degree after age 40. That is success of the system. I do not think you can do that in any other country. But lets not force people to attend college just because someone else is paying for it.
@Destiny007 (5820)
• United States
3 Feb 09
That would be the same clause that authorizes them to take your tax money and redistribute it to someone else in the form of social programs. The clause doesn't exist, and Congress has no Constitutional authority to do most of the things they do, but that doesn't stop them from doing it.
@bobmnu (8160)
• United States
4 Feb 09
Most law makers do not know the Constitution. My brother questioned one lawmaker about the tenth Amendment and he had no idea that there were limits on what congress could do. It would be interesting to see a few court challenges to some of the laws and programs if we had a court that knew and understood the Constitution.