Just Why Does A Person Say This?

@pyewacket (44036)
United States
February 5, 2009 9:23pm CST
I have to admit this might be a rather weird discussion and don't want to be morbid. But when a family member or friend dies why is it the habit that we say "I lost my....(fill in the blank)" Like why "lost"? I mean it's not like one has lost their keys, a wallet, whatever and maybe the chance of the item being found again. Same thing with saying "My (fill in the blank) passed away?" Passed where? Through a wall? through a tunnel? on a street? Maybe I'm just showing a bit of black humor here. But it really does strike me weird at times, does it to you? For instance when I "lost" my mother I didn't say that, I outwardly said my mother died.
8 people like this
12 responses
• United States
6 Feb 09
LOL ok since you asked i will offer my theory we say "lost" not to mean MISplaced but DISplaced instead the loved one was removed from one place and placed in another they were DISplaced we just werent told where the loved one was moved to so they seem "lost" because we dont know exactly where they are
3 people like this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
6 Feb 09
Okay not a bad explanation...mmm...any theories on "passed away" though
1 person likes this
6 Feb 09
it's just another form of experession, nothing more really. it is odd, i guess it's kind of like why we scream "jesus christ" when we get a fright, or saying "you drive me round the bend!!" i mean, what bend? i can't see no bend? and drive? i don't own a car and you won't let me borrow yours, so how can i drive?
3 people like this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
6 Feb 09
Yes that driving me round the bend is also an odd saying
1 person likes this
@blackbriar (9080)
• United States
6 Feb 09
I just can't bring myself to say 'that' word when someone I love dearly leaves us. I usually just say that the Lord above called him/her home and they are now free of the pain they were suffering.
1 person likes this
@Katlady2 (9920)
• United States
6 Feb 09
It DOES make you think more along the lines of the person being misplaced doesn't it? I'm guilty of saying that myself. Now you've gone and made me think now! LOL!
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (119219)
• Boise, Idaho
6 Feb 09
Because they have lost this person from their life. It is a loss. Haven't you ever lost a friend for whatever reason? They may have moved, or changed schools. The emotional attachment and feeling you have for this person means there is a loss because you lose this.
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Feb 09
Because the person is lost to them. I do not know where it started. I lost my Granny last September and I am lost without her so maybe that is why we say we are lost our loved ones.
@alicia812 (648)
• Australia
6 Feb 09
The term "lost" here is being used in a sense that the loved one was lost without hope of coming back or regaining them in this lifetime. It is merely an expression and nothing more really.
• India
6 Feb 09
Recently my grandfather passed away on 25th dec 2008.... after looking this discussion i was remembering him only.. we say because when our loved one goes we cant get them back..
@Aussies2007 (5339)
• Australia
6 Feb 09
I think it is because we misuse the word "lost". Technically... if you lost something... you are not meant to find it again. If you expect to find it again... you only did misplace it. As for "passing away"... it is associated with religion. You pass away into another world. The spirited world.
@guybrush (4660)
• Australia
6 Feb 09
It IS strange - especially as you definitely know where the person is; be it underground or scattered. Maybe it's just an avoidance of using the D-word - maybe some people just feel it's a bit (honest?) harsh. After all, once you've said it, it makes the thing real. We do like to sugarcoat things a bit these days!
@Nhey16 (2519)
• Philippines
6 Feb 09
It's an expression which most of us are used to saying... When ever my husband's asked where his dad is? (for those who haven't known that his dad was already deceased), my hubby would tell them that his dad's six feet under...
@skysuccess (8882)
• Singapore
6 Feb 09
pyewacket, For all parties, it will be out of respect, self comfort, respect, culture and tradition reasons that they do not wish to be seen as brash and insensitive but knowledgeable and sensible. We can always choose a better word as in the very words of Mark Twain: "The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightening and the lightening bug." Say what you like about sugar coating the word, being vague, or weird but I think it is just not ones asking to be ever so blunt, outwardly direct and insensitive. I am sure all parties involved are already grieving and emotional, so it would only be right that we should ever be more careful with the choice of words in our speech. We just do not need to take the words right out literally. Also, there is another consideration which is from the grounds of religion as some quarters believe that this is just a temporary parting and that there will be a final reunion. Have a nice day.