Discriminating Weight

@lisa0351 (303)
United States
May 28, 2009 9:36pm CST
I just saw on the news that female employee in a factory was upset because she was discriminated at work and forced to do another job because of her weight. At her current weight, she was damaging a vital piece of machinery that she was supposed to operate while on the job. Do you think that crosses the line? Honestly, I think that since they gave her an alternate job to do its not such a bad thing. If her weight was honestly damaging the machinery and altering her job performance, it is a factor to consider for performance on the job. Maybe if she lost weight, she could go back to her new job. I could see if they fired her straight up, but being offerred another job this day in age isn't really a bad thing.
5 people like this
12 responses
@clorissa123 (4930)
• United States
29 May 09
She might need to lose weight a little if you consider that her weight affects her job performance. Nowadays, we have to do everything we are be able to keep the money flowing. We have to keep up with our jobs. That is a must. She should appreciate it because she has a second chance.
@rexertea (117)
• India
29 May 09
It's how you look at it. For me the company had shown a nice gesture. On the other hand, I would say the woman should reduce her weight if she plans to continue doing what she did. There are so many weight loss programs available in the market she can find one and start reducing her weight.
@flaredust (728)
• Indonesia
29 May 09
No, it is not cross the line. Actually it is wise decision for management, I mean it is the middle way, good for the management and good for the employee too. May be when first time they accept her join the company, she's not as fat as now, so the management place her at "weigh-sensitive" machine area. But as the time pass, she gain weight over the limitation of that area. I think it is common in industrial job.
• United States
29 May 09
I think it is ridiculous that the woman is making such a big deal out of it! That is a valid reason to change her job description! Companies do have to make special adaptations for people with diabilities, but being overweight isnt a disability! I agree, if they just fired her it would be a different store. But because she still has a job it shouldnt be a problem! I cant imagine having the courage to go to the media with a story like that. I think most people would be too embarrassed!
1 person likes this
@spalladino (17925)
• United States
29 May 09
Rights go both ways. If the woman's weight was damaging to the equipment she was operating the owner had every right to replace her in that position. I have to agree with the poster who suggested that they didn't simply fire her because they feared a lawsuit. At least she still has a job...and hopefully health insurance along with it.
1 person likes this
• United States
29 May 09
i see you rpoint about the job thing, but being over weight is something that is more common this day in age than it ever has before. The problem is that old machinery sometimes is made to only handle a certain weight. let me give another example:::::: you go through walmart and look in there in lawn chair department for those pull out chairs that you see that have the carry bag with them and you see at the sporting event all the time--- anyways, they have a weight limit. do i need to sue walmart for carrying a chair that doesn't carry my weight. i could, but i wouldn't have a leg to stand on. They gave her anohter job instead of just letting her go and some equipment you just have to maintain or they could cost the company millions if they have to replace depending on the machinery. why would she want to the risk to her life if it wouldn't be safe to be on there because she was too heavy. I think I would be upset about it, but then after looking back at the risk on it, I think I would understand. I'd rather be safe than sorry.
• United States
29 May 09
I know weight is a touchy subject, but if the machine was being damaged in any other way, the person responsible would have warned, and if it happened again, been fired on the spot. I think the worker is lucky the company gave her another position, and this incident will probably boost her towards a healthier lifestyle, and there's nothing wrong with that.
1 person likes this
• United States
29 May 09
I think they only didn't fire her because they didn't want the discrimination lawsuit.
1 person likes this
• United States
29 May 09
I think in her case it was not discrimination. They gave her another job and it was probably for their safety as well as hers. In some cases, I'll agree that people are discriminated against though. my friend and I were putting in mass applications together when we were in high school. It made me so mad that they discounted her and treated her badly because of her weight. We went in one at a time to get applications. They gave me and another girl one, but told her they weren't excepting applications. That really upset me, I wouldn't want to work for people who did that. Another instance was her getting turned down for a waitressing job because she wouldn't fit in a bikini (at frickers, which last time I checked was a family restaurant).
• United States
29 May 09
Although people are discriminated against because of there weight in this story I think the company did the right thing. I mean Im assuming she was the size she is when they hired her, but her weight has been damaging there machines so they just put her in another postion. I agree with the poster who said the only reason why they offered her another position was to not have to deal with a lawsuit. If you are in the kind of work that requires you to use machinery and that machinery has a weight limit you have to stay within the requirements. The worker has right but the company has to maintain their equipment. If the machines break, then other workers will be affected not just the person who opporates the machine. It would have been different if she was just fired outright, but they did make sure she was able to go to another position.
@palonghorn (5486)
• United States
29 May 09
They could have very well come up with an 'excuse' to fire her, other than her weight. She wouldn't have been able to do anything about it. However, they did keep her at the company. This whole country has more over-weight people than healthy ones. It may have hurt her feelings, but lets face it, in today's economy at least she wasn't fired. I actually believe that more privately owned companies should follow the path a Texas Fire Department is taking. If a firefighter is over weight.........they have put in a state-of-art workout room, each firefighter has to log in 1 hour of working out on their shift. If they are found to be obese, they are put on desk duty, no fire calls for them. They have one year to loose the weight to a healthier size, if not then they are out the door!. Other businesses as well as other fire departments, police departments, should follow suit.
@sweetcakes (3505)
• United States
29 May 09
Hello If i was the women my feelings would be hurt and i would get over it! overall they didn't fire her they just moved her to a different department. they had to do something if she was damaging there machinery.