What On Earth Is Happening With Qantas?

@Janey1966 (24126)
Carlisle, England
November 4, 2010 6:51am CST
Perhaps my Aussie friends may be able to enlighten me on why Qantas seems to have trouble with its (normally) safe and reliable aircraft. I link to the latest incident below. http://uk.news.yahoo.com/21/20101104/tuk-engine-drama-plane-lands-safely-6323e80.html It's all very scary and I think they are doing the right thing; grounding the planes. I hope they get to the bottom of what is wrong. I suspect it may have something to do with maintenance..you know, cutting corners to save money. I hope I'm wrong on that, though. No doubt it shall all come out in an "Air Crash Investigation" episode!
1 person likes this
5 responses
@RawBill1 (8542)
• Gold Coast, Australia
23 Nov 10
Sorry that I am late to this one Jane! I finally caught up with the discussions in my inbox! I don't think we Aussies have any more idea than the rest of the world about Qantas. They really are an international company now, not just the little Queensland outback company that they were. Their story is an amazing one in the history of business success, but it does seem that they are slipping in recent years. Luckily, there have been no deaths but there have been a number of minor incidents which we never used to hear about from Qantas in past years. I have not flown with them since 1998 when I went overseas. I would not fly with them domestically as they are too expensive. I have flown with their cheaper version Jetstar a few times, but I prefer Virgin Blue as the staff just seem happier and the service more enjoyable.
@Janey1966 (24126)
• Carlisle, England
23 Nov 10
Aah, yes the Virgin brand. I have yet to fly with them..but I will, one day.
@RawBill1 (8542)
• Gold Coast, Australia
24 Nov 10
I just got this message below from Qantas as I am a member of their frequent flyer program. "I am pleased to advise that Qantas will resume A380 services, commencing with an initial A380 service to London via Singapore on Saturday 27 November. We have undertaken a rigorous inspection program in conjunction with Rolls Royce and Airbus to ensure the fleet is ready to return to service. We always put safety first, and we continue to take a conservative approach to the reintroduction of the A380 fleet. So we will initially operate the A380 between Australia and the United Kingdom. As more A380s come into service, we will assess when and how best to deploy them. I want to assure you that we have full confidence in our A380 aircraft fleet, and will not fly any individual aircraft unless we are completely sure that it is safe to do so. Qantas has six A380s in its fleet, and is scheduled to take delivery of two new A380s before the end of this year, and a further two next year. With our fleet of more than 250 aircraft, we are able to maintain a full international and domestic network, so you can book and fly with us with confidence. I want to thank you for your loyalty and patience. On behalf of all of us at Qantas we deeply regret any inconvenience. We look forward to welcoming you warmly when next you fly. ALAN JOYCE Qantas Chief Executive Officer"
@Janey1966 (24126)
• Carlisle, England
3 Jan 11
@doggydimon (1372)
• Philippines
26 Dec 10
In fairness to Qantas, they still hold the record of not having any major crash. However, this is a bit scary. During the past year or two years maybe, Qantas has quite a number of engine failures in mid air. I think it is around 4 or 5. I dunno where the problem is but they sure have to look at it right away.
@Janey1966 (24126)
• Carlisle, England
3 Jan 11
Apparently, Qantas are sueing Rolls-Royce (who make the engines) for loss of business when some of their planes were grounded. I think this is a bit extreme as Rolls-Royce have co-operated fully with their investigations on the engine. They want to get to the bottom of it just as much as Qantas so to have a lawsuit on top of all that can't be very helpful. They are a reputable company though, so will pay up.
@bobmnu (8160)
• United States
5 Nov 10
I saw pictures of the engine and what impressed me was that the engine blew out away from the passenger and did not damage the controls. This is how the plane and engine is designed. The modern airplanes are designed with safety in mind and the systems are redundant and most planes can withstand multiple failures. What caused this problem will be studies and it is probably a series of things that went wrong to cause the engine to explode.
@Janey1966 (24126)
• Carlisle, England
5 Nov 10
Wow, I never knew that about this engine. Good old Rolls-Royce, you gotta love 'em! Qantas are trying to blame Rolls-Royce for the design of the engine (saying it's flawed), which I think is a tad early in the investigation to do that. I mean, didn't Qantas have a say in what the design of the engine should be? Surely, Rolls-Royce liaised with others in their initial design? Someone from Qantas must have OK'd it at some stage? So many questions!
@ybong007 (6658)
• Philippines
5 Nov 10
It was all over the news yesterday. But two times in a row is no longer a coincidence. Quantas is a famous airline and the fact the it's plane blows a part in mid air won't help their image even if there are no casualties.
@Janey1966 (24126)
• Carlisle, England
5 Nov 10
I agree. It's only a matter of time before there ARE casualties and I dread the day that comes (and I hope it doesn't of course) but Qantas shouldn't have this "we shall never crash" attitude. In my opinion, they should be thinking the opposite and not think about the profits for a change.
4 Nov 10
I hadn't heard about this crash until a moment after I opened to respond to this as the news for my area as just come on. I'm shocked to hear that the engine was made in Derby! At the moment I don't know the full story, looks like I might have to wait for them to get round to sharing it. Hopefully it won't be due to them cutting costs or the fact it was a failing engine which wasn't correctly put together. It's very saddening though, was anyone hurt or killed? :/
@Janey1966 (24126)
• Carlisle, England
4 Nov 10
Qantas have never had a major accident so their safety record remains intact, although they've had a few close shaves recently. This particular plane was one of those huge, double-decker Airbuses and the Rolls-Royce engine is a new version, from what I can gather. Due to the fact other manufacturers can make engines for the Airbus it is imperative that this is dealt with as soon as possible because Rolls-Royce want to secure any further contracts. My Grandad used to work for them (in Barnoldswick or Glossop, I can't remember which) so he'd be mortified if he was still alive. Such good engines, usually, aren't they?