Partly or partially ...

@vandana7 (57187)
India
November 21, 2010 4:28am CST
Continuing with my never ending English doubts... When do you use partly and when do you use partially... I find myself unable to differentiate between them. :( And if it is not an issue with you all ... Would you write - Few years back or Few years ago... And why not Few years behind... he he See being ignorant has its advantages.
6 responses
@Aaleexix (2291)
• India
21 Nov 10
Partly and partially are to some extent interchangeable.Partly is used when referring to a part or parts of something. for example the bridge is partly (not partially) made of stone. while partially is preferred for the meaning to some extent: his mother is partially (not partly) sighted. partly - in part; in some degree; not wholly; "I felt partly to blame"; "The engine of the car is partially damaged" I want to make it clear with another example. If liver is damaged then liver is partly damage of the body but body is partially damaged as liver is part of the body. Damage of liver is partly damage and damage of liver is partial damage of the body.
@Aaleexix (2291)
• India
21 Nov 10
****Damage of liver is partly damage and damage of liver is partial damage of the body. Damage of liver is partly damage of the body. and damage of the liver is partial damage for the body .
2 people like this
@vandana7 (57187)
• India
21 Nov 10
That is what I used to think, but today when I was responding to one of the mylotters, I realized I'd used the word partially. It didn't seem odd. So I just wanted to confirm. :) Thanks for help. :)
1 person likes this
@inutme (372)
• Philippines
21 Nov 10
I checked Merriam-Webster's Learners Dictionary online and found this info: - Partially is used more often to modify an adjective or past participle that names or suggests a process - Partly is more often used before clauses or phrases that offers an explanation Partially is also the opposite of completely and partly, the opposite of wholly. From their examples, it seems that partially is more often used before a verb. eg. We decided not to go hiking, partly because of the weather. Her homework is partially done. You can visit www.learnersdictionary.com for more info. Good luck!
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@vandana7 (57187)
• India
21 Nov 10
Aw - that was so sweet of you to do so much reference. :) But my foundation in English grammar is weak. So I wouldnt know what are past participles, adjectives, and verbs. :( I studied in Hindi medium up until the grade they'd covered grammar. :( So by the time I came to English medium school, we were reading story books. :) But thanks for the link. :) I'll try to get something from it. :) Hopefully, I would've improved some the next time we meet. :)
2 people like this
• India
21 Nov 10
Dear Vandy In my time there was no english medium school in my city, then a town, i read with oriya medium, hindi from class 4th and english from class 6th only, but our english teacher in high school, was very through in grammer, i think my grammer is good.. But english is an wonderful language, still difficult to grasp fully.. I taught in colleges in english only.. Thank you so much. Professor. . Cheers have a great day ahead. God bless you. Welcome always.
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@vandana7 (57187)
• India
21 Nov 10
Same with me professor. In sixth standard, the rest of my schoolmates were reading Enid Blyton and Hardy Boys, while I was stuck with Jack and the Bean Stalk. That bad. :( I read my first Enid Blyton in 8th grade, and in 9th grade it was Nancy Drew. Once these mystery books got me hooked, there was no looking back. But ... the foundation is missing, so I am never sure about my command over the language. :(
2 people like this
@shibham (17025)
• India
21 Nov 10
Hi vandie... I think Partly means a single part from a whole and partially means several parts from a whole. As i am not a native english speaker so i am suffering to express it. Anyway i just want to ask you why the pronunciation of "chemistry" and "character" are not the same. I mean the pronunciation of "ch'? Take care.
1 person likes this
@vandana7 (57187)
• India
21 Nov 10
What happens when there are no parts kiddo? :) I mean what would you say when you need to say - partly the parent's fault or partially the parent's fault. :) And shibam - honestly - I am mighty glad I dont talk to the Americans or all these native English speaking folks out here. :) I am sure they would not understand one word that I would have uttered, and like wise, I might be nodding at something I couldn't follow. he he
1 person likes this
@shibham (17025)
• India
21 Nov 10
vandie... i already said that i am unable to express but know the differences while using. Yeah mel.. you are right. i put two same words where i need to show the difference. Well Cholera and Chat.... Should be those two words. Thanks for your alert.
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@vandana7 (57187)
• India
21 Nov 10
Mel - they understand me because they've got habituated to blunders like mine may be. he he In any event, if Dawny, Saphy, or you were talking to me, I would be nodding my head for sure. :)
1 person likes this
@jennyze (7048)
• Indonesia
22 Nov 10
These are what I think: partly = a part of something partially = in stages few years ago = formal few years back = informal few years behind = late for few years already What do I know?
1 person likes this
@vandana7 (57187)
• India
22 Nov 10
Jen, fjaril is not a veteran, to the best of my knowledge and belief and as per the information and explanations furnished to me. And if you want to know more about this blond with graying temples, you just have to ask. :) And thanks for such a nice explanation. That is very concise and crystal clear!
1 person likes this
@jennyze (7048)
• Indonesia
23 Nov 10
Wow, I got compliment from another blond? Do you think he likes me, Vandy? Should I chase him, like I chase hiccups? I'll luv it.
@vandana7 (57187)
• India
15 Dec 10
Jen fjaril is the most soft-hearted person I've come across out here... swiss cheese... go ahead.. I dont know how I missed this one though... he he
@Hatley (157768)
• Garden Grove, California
23 Nov 10
hi vandy example he was partly to blame for the accident. the trail mix was partially full of almonds, raisins, chocolate'and chunks of candied fruits. no cannot do few year behind. I cou ld say i am four days behind in getting caught up on mylpt/ I can say a few years ago I was just sixty now look at me.sob. or I can look back on my teen years and shudder as I never ever want to relive those .that is the truth too lol I am not up on grammar to say why but hope you get the drift of the difference in usage.
1 person likes this
@urbandekay (18314)
22 Nov 10
As a native English speaker I tend to select the word to use by whether it 'sounds' right, that's not much help to you as I cannot give you a hard and fast rule only say it comes with experience of English speakers. I would usually use, 'A few years ago.' I might use 'A few years back' in particular contexts but I would not use your 'behind,' since there is nothing that the years are behind. Try to get a copy of Fowler English Usage, which is the definitive guide here. all the best urban
@vandana7 (57187)
• India
15 Dec 10
Sorry for delaying response Urban. Thanks for help. We - who are not native English speakers, do have many many doubts... :) Many of these are because we express differently in our language. :) Believe me I took five minutes to draft these four sentences. You would have finished it in a minute...:)