Different traditons concerning dragons. Celtic and Asian are ones I've vaguely

@writersedge (22579)
United States
March 13, 2011 10:58am CST
heard about. Do you know any celtic or asian dragon beliefs? What do you know or have you heard about the different beliefs concerning dragons? Are there any good dragon books or other informations that is really good? I don't seem to know what I should about dragons. I always thought dragons were lucky, but then someone told me that depends on the typre or color of dragon. So apparently I need to know more about dragons since I work in a gift shope with lots and lots of dragons. It's the year of the rabbit, I think, so I thought I would need to know more about rabbits. But this shipment of dragons the gift shop got in and the popularity of the sales indicates they're a hot item and I don't want to sound ignorant, but apparently I did.
3 responses
@Dinoman90 (225)
• Denmark
13 Mar 11
Dragons are so cool and it's very interesting to read about how they differ from eachother in different cultures. I'm from Scandinavia and usually our dragons basically looks like big snakes usually with horns and they have the ability to breathe fire or poison. Their blood can also be poisonous. One of the best known Norse dragons is the Midgaard Serpent which you've probably heard of!
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
13 Mar 11
No, actually I don't know much about Scandinavian culture at all, but I would like to know more. I will definitely have to look up Midgaard Serpent.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
13 Mar 11
This is fun and cool! I just did a search here at Mylot for Midgaard Serpent. I found out two things. There is a comic that has that in it and this other site (hopefully one of two ways that I write it, it will come up.): www.unicomgarden.com/midgard http://www.unicomgarden.com/midgard.htm www.unicomgarden.com/migard.htm Beautiful picture it it's correct and wonderous story that goes with it. So is this correct?
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
13 Mar 11
I just tried all three and none of them come up, I was sure I copied it correctly! Oh well. it is cool anyway.
@celticeagle (120516)
• Boise, Idaho
13 Mar 11
It seems like dragons are in nearly every mythological community. Japanese, german, celtic, Irish, English and it go on and on. Celtic people showed great reverence for the dragon even had them on their flag. Some saw them as serpentine and others monsters. In Scripture dragons refered to any great monster or beast. I think a person could do alot of research and just scratch the surface.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
13 Mar 11
Yes, I didn't realize there was so much out there on dragons. I had only thought a couple of cultures had much to do with them. The above 2 responses were also very interesting. You might find them interesting, too.
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (120516)
• Boise, Idaho
13 Mar 11
I see. Thanks.
@Galena (9123)
13 Mar 11
a really enjoyable book about Dragons is the flight of dragons by Peter Dickinson. it's not the story that the film with the same name was based on (that was called The Dragon and the George. I forget the name of the author) instead it takes different literature accounts of dragons or beings with similar traits to dragons and pulls together ideas about their life cycles, breeding patterns, habits, biology and so on, with theories taken from these accounts. such as how they can breathe fire, and why there are no fossil or modern remains, how they can fly, and so on. it's very clever how it ties different points in these accounts and comes up with theories that would explain that. there are some references to oriental dragons, as well as the more usual European idea of Dragons, and even looks into things like Beowulf, and how the creatures in that may have been dragons and why. so it's quite an interesting, and also beautifully illustrated read. if you want another source of dragon mythology from different cultures, I beleive the childrens picture book, Dragonology, does touch on different cultures dragons. but there's quite a bit of straight fiction woven through too, which may be confusing. it's also worth reading up on winged serpents, basilisk, chimera, wyrm, wyvern, gryphon and so on. mythical creatures that could each be loosely considered dragons in some way or other.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
13 Mar 11
Wow! Thank you very much! So neat, I forgot about Knights slaying dragons, I had heard about that as a wee child. This should be really neat to find out more.