Doctor Shortage?

@debrakcarey (19924)
United States
July 1, 2012 8:00pm CST
A physician shortage in the U.S. was expected even before the Affordable Care Act was signed into law in 2010, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges. Now the group estimates that there will be a shortage of 63,000 doctors by 2015 and 130,600 by 2025. The shortage is a result of several factors. A large number of medical professionals are reaching retirement age, as is a large group of patients: Nearly 15 million will become eligible for Medicare in the coming years, the Association of American Medical Colleges reports. On top of that, there is a lack of residency spots available for students graduating from medical school. In 2011, more than 7,000 were left with degrees that said “M.D.” but no place to continue their education, according to the National Residency Matching Program. Our small town has a 200 bed hospital and several clinics with private practices. I talked to 3 of those doctors who are closing their clinics and either working at the hospital as a hospitalist (only works through hospital) or retiring. Nurses are quitting too. I quit my job as a medication tech. went to school for business tech (computers). And the new TAX (Obamacare) will only make it worse. Shortage of caregivers?
2 people like this
4 responses
@factorial (982)
• Philippines
2 Jul 12
Oh! I thought it is only in our country that there is a shortage of medical doctors. We lack doctors here because many are going to other countries... some are going to the United States of America for higher pay...
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
2 Jul 12
I know, many of 'your' doctors are practicing here. Three in our little 200 bed hospital. One had a private practice in heart care, now he works only for the hospital in our ER. sad. Perhaps it is worldwide, many people from around the world come here for their training and then stay to practice. Our hospital has a program that sends our doctors overseas to Africa, Asia to help with care for the terminal and the chronic.
• Philippines
2 Jul 12
My son, who is now a nurse, wanted to take up medicine next school year... and he said he wanted to become a community doctor in the States hahaha!
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
2 Jul 12
He will be sorely needed, but I wouldn't count on making a lot of money. And student loans could be a problem too. There is a bubble with those too, about to burst, because so many cannot pay them back. Easy money still has to be paid back. Believe me, I know. I have $20,000 in student loans I am having trouble paying back.
@flowerchilde (12518)
• United States
10 Jul 12
It's beyond me why more people cannot think ahead and connect the dots. Logic so often can show us right where certain policies are sure to take us.. instead, all too often these days, it seems we will have to learn through painful experience.. It's just too bad that all this hope and change will be falling for such a large part upon the heads of our children and grand children (depending on our age)..
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
10 Jul 12
Many people do not think for themselves. And they accept what they are told without question. It's kinda creepy. In my family, extended AND immediate, even when we agree we argue about the details. lol
@andy77e (5165)
• United States
3 Jul 12
I don't think American's are willing to do what is necessary, unfortunately. It's a horribly complicated issue, and government runs through it. First, regulation on regulation on regulation. I'll give you a simple example. It was mind blowing to learn how insanely expensive it is to get one dose, two pills, of regular over-the-counter aspirin at a hospital. Why? All medicines have to be given by a trained Nurse. Which of course is a good sum of money, especially at odd hours. Second, the medication is individually wrapped. Which of course is massively more expensive than an economy bottle of 200 tablets at CVS for $10. But in order to cut these prices, we'd have to remove those regulations, and at the same time prevent people for suing hospitals over... "I got sick after an non-nurse gave me an aspirin from a dirty half used bottle." But the problem is, we don't want to pay for a highly trained nurse, and expensive individually wrapped aspirin. This exact problem is all throughout the health care profession. It's everywhere. The same thing happens in India and China, but people don't complain and sue everyone. If you get sick... hey they did the best they could, and that's how it goes. In American, if you get sick, then they look for anything they can to pass the blame onto someone. That aspirin could have been contaminated because it wasn't individually wrapped. So it's the hospital's fault, and I want a million dollars. So, we have individually wrapped aspirin, and everyone suffers higher cost. The Obama Care will increase cost, but it's strategically designed to do so in a way that will drive people crazy. It's possible that Obama and Company didn't have this planned out, but it wouldn't surprise me. Insurance is all about risk assessment. The more risk the company assumes, the higher the premiums have to be on everyone. The lower the risk, the cheaper the premiums. By mandating by Federal Law, that all insurance companies MUST take more and more risk (provide more services, more coverage), they are in effect forcing those companies to charge a much much higher premiums. Normally the free-market would force premiums down. But there is no free-market because the insurance companies can't control the size and scope of the risk (the coverage). As such everyone will simply jack up their prices to cover the additional risk. Insurance premiums will climb even fast than in the past. As such, insurance companies will rake in billions on billions in profits. In the short term, the public will see additional coverage as a plus, and thank Obama for mandating better health insurance. But in the long term, the prices will spike up, and people will see insurance companies making trillions in profits, and of course, they won't blame Obama for this, but rather the insurance companies. It's a win-win for Obama. I highly doubt there will be enough educated people, to not fall for this trap.
@dragon54u (31615)
• United States
2 Jul 12
I don't personally know any doctors who are quitting but I've heard plenty of them on radio shows and read interviews where they say they'll be losing money and they're going to go someplace else or get into another profession. One urologist said if not for her private patients she couldn't keep the office open because Medicare and Medicaid don't pay even half her operating costs per patient visit. Better stay healthy!!
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
2 Jul 12
Or die quickly.