Beeswax candles

@Masihi (4228)
Canada
July 2, 2012 6:12pm CST
I'm wondering if anyone has experience with pure beeswax candles. I know they're expensive, and I'd like to get the pure non-scented kind because I hear it helps keep down the dust (our flat is extremely dusty) and also to purefy the air in the rooms. I heard it produces negative ions which helps with air quality. What is your experience? Or is that just stuff made up? I've done research and the info I read seem to match each other.
2 people like this
5 responses
@barehugs (8986)
• Canada
4 Jul 12
As professional beekeepers we produce up to a ton of pure beeswax in a season. We take pride in our work and our beeswax is no exception. Pure beeswax is pure and light in color, and burns hot and clean when made into candles. A burning beeswax candle cleans the air, and leaves a room smelling fresh and clean.Pure beeswax is scented with the fragrance of honey and flowers.
1 person likes this
@Masihi (4228)
• Canada
5 Jul 12
Thank you , Barehugs for adding your input I really wanted to know if it really does work and I'm glad it does,well obviously you burn the beeswax yourself, so you would know. Stowyk, I would definmitely stay away from cheap candle and paraffin wax because it's man-made and releases toxic chemeicals into the air. I've seen them before and they're light yellowish colour, but I admit I never smelled one burning before. It is definitely more expensive but you're paying for quality, and it has a much longer burn time.
@barehugs (8986)
• Canada
5 Jul 12
Pure beeswax is a light yellow, and has a honey-like smell, so no need to add any fragrance to your beeswax candles. Be careful buying beeswax because many stores mix paraffin 50/50 with beeswax, but still charge the same amount. This mixture does not have the fragrance and burns much faster. Best to buy your wax from a local beekeeper! Paraffin wax releases fumes that smell like diesel exhaust.
1 person likes this
@Shellyann36 (9513)
• United States
2 Jul 12
I have used beeswax candles before but I am not sure of the positive or negatives behind the beeswax candles. Sorry that I cannot be of more help. I was very fortunate that a lady I worked with had an aviary and her and her hubby sold honey and beeswax candles on the side. They seemed to last longer than regular candles. That is about all I remember from them.
@Masihi (4228)
• Canada
5 Jul 12
Yes, I do know they burn longer, have a lower burning temperature, and burn cleaner, that much I could gather from my research. I'd like to buy the natural wax that's 100% pure with no colour or scent, so I'd be getting the most benefit I can get from the candles. I'm also thinking of using soy candles as well, they make a lovely holiday gift, too.
• United States
6 Jul 12
If you go to the craft store Michael's they actually have beeswax that you can make into candles. It is located in the candle making section. I think it is rather expensive though. Good luck.
1 person likes this
@RawBill1 (8542)
• Gold Coast, Australia
4 Jul 12
We have some beeswax candles here but have not really used them too much. They are natural and unscented. I had not heard of beeswax candles giving off negative ions before. We have Himalayan salt lamps for that. They are really good for giving out negative ions, but you have to be careful where you place them as they can suck in moisture from the air and then release it in a big salt watery mess at the base of them, so they have to be on a large bowl or in some sort of container. We put a big stain on the top of wooden speakers a few years ago with one.
1 person likes this
@Masihi (4228)
• Canada
5 Jul 12
Hmm, never heard of those salt lamps before, how do they work for you guys? Do they makethe air fresh and purify the air? I'm quite curious. That's what I want anyway, the unscented beeswax that are 100% pure, no additives or scents added. I'd like to get some pure soy wax as well for a good scented candle, though. But both I know burn cleaner and have low burning temperatures.
@carmelanirel (20979)
• United States
4 Jul 12
The only time I used beeswax was when I mixed it with other wax to make candles. I don't know if it cuts down on dust, but if you find out, I'd love to know, I need a break from all the dusting I do. I also heard that burning candles cut down on the humidity. Though I couldn't tell if it worked last Friday when we lost our power.
@Masihi (4228)
• Canada
5 Jul 12
Cutting down on humidity? Not sure I never heard that but I did hear about beeswax giving off negative ions to purify the air and give the room a refreshing atmosphere. I've also heard they help a bit with depression and moods. Either way, I know it's all natural and non of the paraffin stuff, which gives off soot and toxic chemicals in the air. Do you mix your beeswax with soy wax?
@ptbmom (8)
• United States
2 Jul 12
I have never used beeswax candles but I've also heard that they aren't great for air quality. I like the soy candles. Have you tried those? The soy candle doesn't produce the black soot like paraffin does. Soy candles not only have a great scent throw, but also have a cleaner smell. I use them in the kitchen when I'm cooking and that also helps with keeping my house from smelling like what I've just cooked. Just a thought...
1 person likes this
@Masihi (4228)
• Canada
5 Jul 12
I'm also thinking of buying soy wax to make soy candles, they'll make excellent gifts for the winter holiday season when everyone's giving gifts to each other. I mean everyone loves scented candles, eh? I don't like anything with parrafin in it, those candles stink to the high heavens, and especially after doing research I won't have those kinds of candles in my flat ever again!