When in the Course of Human Events

@debrakcarey (19924)
United States
July 4, 2012 9:16am CST
1764 - Committees of Correspondence Organized by Samuel Adams, these helped spread opinions and information through letters and pamphlets. 1765 - Quartering Act Britain ordered that colonists were to house and feed British soldiers if necessary. 1765 - Stamp Act This required tax stamps on many items and documents including playing cards, newspapers, and marriage licenses. Prime Minister George Grenville stated that this direct tax was intended for the colonies to pay for defense. Previous taxes imposed by Britain had been indirect, or hidden. 1765 - Stamp Act Congress In 1765, 27 delegates from nine colonies met in New York City and drew up a statement of rights and grievances thereby bringing colonies together in opposition to Britain. 1765 - Sons and Daughters of Liberty Colonists tried to fight back by imposing non-importation agreements. The Sons of Liberty often took the law into their own hands enforcing these 'agreements' by methods such as tar and feathering. 1767 - Townshend Acts These taxes were imposed to help make the colonial officials independent of the colonists and included duties on glass, paper, and tea. Smugglers increased their activities to avoid the tax leading to more troops in Boston. 1770 - Boston Massacre The colonists and British soldiers openly clashed in Boston. This event was used as an example of British cruelty despite questions about how it actually occurred. 1773 - Tea Act To assist the failing British East India Company, the Company was given a monopoly to trade tea in America. 1773 - Boston Tea Party A group of colonists disguised as Indians dumped tea overboard from three ships in Boston Harbor. 1774 - Intolerable Acts These were passed in response to the Boston Tea Party and placed restrictions on the colonists including outlawing town meetings and the closing of Boston Harbor. 1774 - First Continental Congress In response to the Intolerable Acts, 12 of the 13 colonies met in Philadelphia from September-October, 1774. One of the main results of this was the creation of The Association calling for a boycott of British goods. 1775 - Lexington and Concord In April, British troops were ordered to Lexington and Concord to seize stores of colonial gunpowder and to capture Samuel Adams and John Hancock. At Lexington, open conflict occurred and eight Americans were killed. At Concord, the British troops were forced to retreat with the loss of 70 men. This was the first instance of open warfare. 1775 - Second Continental Congress All 13 colonies were represented at this meeting in Philadelphia beginning May. The colonists still hoped that their grievances would be met by King George III. George Washington was named head of the Continental Army. 1775 - Bunker Hill This major victory for the Colonists resulted in George III proclaiming the colonies in rebellion. Preamble to the Declaration of Independence When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.--That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.--Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world. I have posted the timeline of events that led to the American Revolution. Are we going through similar abuses today? I have highlighted in the Declaration the statements made by Jefferson on abolishing government that is not responsive to the people. What are your thoughts?
2 people like this
2 responses
@carmelanirel (20979)
• United States
6 Jul 12
My first thought was, "I am back in History Class" lol That is a good point, our taxes are being used for things that some people feel is wrong. Like abortion and now this health care plan. It totally stinks... So, what are we going to throw overboard to rebel against this tax?
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
6 Jul 12
I hope all the liberal Democrats can swim....
1 person likes this
• United States
6 Jul 12
It took me a while to get what you meant...
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
6 Jul 12
I had a bit of a tiff with someone over Thomas Jefferson today, still feeling a bit peaved.
1 person likes this
@peavey (16487)
• United States
4 Jul 12
The United States is a deeply divided country right now, as it was then. Not every colonist wanted to sever the umbilical cord of Great Britain. Some of the ones who did, felt as if they were forced into that decision by actions of Great Britain itself. Are we at that point again? I don't know. Only time will tell. When all is said and done, the leaders are the ones who pull and push and create crises and victories. We can say "we the people" all we want, but without strong leaders, we do nothing. We have the God given right to do what needs to be done. What comes of that, I simply don't know.
@debrakcarey (19924)
• United States
4 Jul 12
Yes, they were just as divided then as we are now. And now, we have twitter, facebook and mylot to communicate the differences. lol As for being at that point once again, I hesitate to say so, but I think we are. Those social media sites are ablaze with all the reasons why and why not. It will come to a head. what the outcome will be only time will tell. I hope for the Constitution to be upheld, I hope that we don't succumb to the easy answers. I pray God we will still be free when it's over.
• United States
10 Jul 12
Me too, Debra, me too.