Frugal First Aid?

United States
August 31, 2012 3:15pm CST
Im trying to build a better first aid kit for my home. I have a million bandaids and things like that but I need to put in the things like neosporin, burn cream, and things like that. I know that there are some things that can be used for first aid that are house hold items like vinegar for chemical burns. What other household or frugal items can be used for first aid that I can put in my kits?
2 people like this
4 responses
@carmelanirel (20979)
• United States
31 Aug 12
I didn't know about vinegar for chemical burns, but then again, most burns I get are from when I am cooking..lol If you want something frugal, but also beneficial not just for burns, (burns like I get, from a hot stove) but also good for cleaning the air. That is an aloe vera plant and trust me, I have a low tolerance of pain, so when I find something that takes the pain away, I stick with it and using the juice of this plant not only is good for the burn, but it removes the pain like no store bought burn medication ever has. Which leads me to your neosporin. When I had three children 3 years apart, that meant going through lots of bandaids and antibiotic ointment and at the time, I believe it was 4-5 dollars a tube.. So I went comparison shopping and if you have a dollar store or general dollar store, they carry their brand name for 2.50, though when my kids were younger, it was only 2 dollars, what a savings!!! and it worked as well as the name brand stuff.. So if there is a store near you, perhaps you can find other first aid for a lot less.. I hope I helped you a little...:)
• United States
31 Aug 12
Oh Greenmoo reminded me of another "must have" Now I don't know if this is available in your area, I think my husband gets it at auto zone, a store where they sell car parts, but if not, I have seen where you can buy this online. It's called Fast Orange and it is sold as a hand cleaner for mechanics, with pumice in it. I found this wonderful product to be useful for poison ivy and insect bites about 3-4 years ago and especially when warm weather hits, I make sure I have some in my bathroom. Because mechanics wash their hands a lot, it is safe, though if you or someone you know has sensitive skin, you probably should test it first. This is also extremely easy to use. Whenever a bite or rash starts itching, I scoop out enough of the cleaner to cover the area and I scrub with a wash cloth until I feel relief and then rinse. Now if you are using this on poison ivy, you should change the wash cloth every time and wash the wash cloth separately from other clothes so you don't contaminate or spread the poison ivy. The benefits of this are, it relieves the itching,
1 person likes this
• United States
31 Aug 12
Id bet the local dollar store does carry a generic neosporin. Great idea! I make lye soap so we keep the vinegar close incase there is a splash of lye, which has never happend but we try to be prepared. I didnt know about the fast orange working on rashes. We do deal with the occasional rash, often from bumping into plants up hiking. I think the pummis sounds like it would feel great on it! I cant wait to try this out. Thanks!
1 person likes this
• United States
1 Sep 12
If you know me, I rarely promoted something as much as I do this Fast Orange, though I did find out if one is really allergic to poison ivy, he or she should see a doctor. My future son-in-law is, and whether he did it wrong or it didn't work, I don't know, but I know it worked on me and like I said, I am never without it, especially in warm weather when bites and poison ivy happen more often..
@GreenMoo (11842)
31 Aug 12
I use home made balms made with calendula or plantain for many things, and vinegar to neutralise stings, but otherwise my first aid kit is a pretty sparse version of a standard one. I have bandages, tape and wound dressings, oxygenated water, painkillers .... and not much else.
1 person likes this
@GreenMoo (11842)
1 Sep 12
I keep a few bandaids, but generally just for hand or foot wounds that need dressing to prevent dirt getting in. I rarely put them on the kids because I figure that a would that is small enough to go under your average plaster is not big enough to worry about once it's been cleaned! My kids are still alive, so it's a technique that works for us. I keep gauze and various widths of tape for larger wounds, plus bandages to hold the lot in place. If a wound is large enough to require medical attention then my aim is to keep it clean and covered until medical attention can be sought.
@Fishmomma (11504)
• United States
31 Aug 12
I would put in a pair of Scissors and school supplies are on sale at many stores. Its the best time of year to buy cheaply. Good luck with your kit. I would also suggest adding water to your kit, as many people forget water.
1 person likes this
• United States
31 Aug 12
Water is a great tip. Especialy if we are in an emergency situation and running to get some would waste precious time. We did learn that scissors are a necessity when my daughter got hurt this week. Nail clippers just didnt work like we thought they would to trim her skin sway. She tripped in the dirt in the backyard and we needed to move the skin to get the dirt out. It was torture for her and it could have been so much better with the right tools.
• United States
1 Sep 12
epsom salt is great for a tooth ache. you could put some in a ziplock pouche and have it there incase someone has a problem with a tooth at your house.
• United States
28 Sep 12
I have epsom salt at home for baths but I had no idea you could use it on a tooth ache. Wow, the things you learn here. Thanks. I can even find decient sized containers of this at the local dollar store.