glowing eyes in photos---does this mean anything?

@Cutie18f (9567)
Philippines
October 4, 2012 5:19pm CST
Someone I know recently freaked out when she found out that her eyes glowed in pictures when others' eyes don't. She googled what it means and learned that this could be a symptom of brain cancer. She went to a doctor but the doctor said she is fine but she still insisted that she has the said ailment. She even took a picture of herself and her companion using her cellphone camera to show to the doctor what she meant. Indeed the photo she took showed her with glowing eyes while the other person's eyes were just normal. Her pictures everywhere, morning or evening, shows her with eyes that glow or sparkle like the eyes of vampires in movies. Is this perhaps the result of too much exposure to the computer? Her work makes her use the computer much of the time and she'd been doing this for many years already. Please share what you know.
1 person likes this
12 responses
@jenny1015 (13407)
• Philippines
5 Oct 12
Although there had been studies saying that the glow in the eyes could mean some medical condition, it my also mean other things. Since your friend have already sought doctor's advice and told her that she is okay, I think she ought to calm herself and thank God that she is okay. This could be another reason for that glowing eyes on the photo: simply that the angle in which the flash hits your eyes catches different color pigments than usual. Eyes glowing red in photographs comes when a person is looking straight and directly into the flash.
@Cutie18f (9567)
• Philippines
5 Oct 12
How come the eyes of the person next to her and looking at the camera like her have normal eyes? Really a puzzle.
@jenny1015 (13407)
• Philippines
5 Oct 12
It happens. I have pictures that looks like what you are describing. Not anyone of us is suffering from any medical condition.
@Bionicman (3967)
• Czech Republic
5 Oct 12
 Leukocoria, white glow - eye cancer
At first this made me laugh but I wondered why she would think that so I goggled it and found out there's some truth in there. She probably read somewhere about Retinoblastoma and got paranoid. It's a rare, cancerous tumor of a part of the eye called the retina and can be identified on photographs as a white glare in an eye, similar to the red glare people often have in photographs. That white glow, called leukocoria, is really just the absence of the normal red glow, which comes from blood vessels in the layers of the eye behind the retina. When a tumor is present, it can deflect the camera flash’s light out of the eye, which creates the white glow. The good thing is, if she's taking photographs of herself, she's most probably too old to have it. Retinoblastoma affects children under the age of 6. It is most commonly diagnosed in children aged 1 - 2 years. So don't worry, she doesn't have cancer. She's probably just possessed by the devil or something.
• United States
5 Oct 12
Possession instead of cancer? Well, that's a relief!
@Cutie18f (9567)
• Philippines
11 Oct 12
OMG. That's even worst I think.
• India
5 Oct 12
If the flash is straight in her eyes, then it reflects in the retina. And that's why it glows. This is called Red Eye. Use the camera which has red eye reduction option.
@Cutie18f (9567)
• Philippines
11 Oct 12
I will need to tell her this, thanks.
• Philippines
5 Oct 12
Your belief is farther from the truth. The glowing eyes that you mention is caused by the flash reflected from the eyes to the camera. This happens when the camera is directly aligned with the subject's iris. The result is called 'red eye'. To avoid this have the camera positioned 1 to 10 degrees from the subject. If your camera is equipped with red eye reduction, have it activated. You can also increase the light source before taking the shots. Do not believe that a camera can be used to predict the health condition of people. If that is true, then doctors/physicians will become obsolete.
@Cutie18f (9567)
• Philippines
11 Oct 12
This should already console her, I hope. Thanks.
@jazel_juan (15595)
• Philippines
5 Oct 12
it means she is very paranoid... and she ought to learn to adjust those red eye settings in her camera.
@Cutie18f (9567)
• Philippines
11 Oct 12
Maybe she should. LOL
@cynthiann (18687)
• Jamaica
4 Oct 12
Does it mean anything? Yes it does. Someone took a lousy photograph of her if she has red eyes in ther photo Nothing to do with brain cencer at all.
• United States
4 Oct 12
She could just have that sparkle in her eye LOL. If she is freaking out over that then she might need to go see a physciatric doctor or something just saying. I can tell you its not the computer because most of my work involves being on the computer too and that doesnt make my eyes sparkle or be red in pictures. I use my cell phone alot too and i dont think at all that being on the computer for long periods is making her eyes do that.
@Cutie18f (9567)
• Philippines
5 Oct 12
Yeah, we told her maybe it's all in the mind after all.
@toniganzon (15702)
• Philippines
17 Oct 12
This is something that i haven't heard before and i think your friend should seek a second opinion. It's a bit scary. I always stay in front of my computer, especially when i was still working, i was in front of the pc more than 12 hours a day. I've never noticed that my eyes were glowing in a picture though.
• Philippines
10 Oct 12
I usually notice those "red eyes" in photos on people with lighter-colored eyes. I don't think it's anything to worry about.
@suspenseful (40331)
• Canada
5 Oct 12
What it is is red eye. There is usually a program on your photo software that fixes it. See check for red eye, and then make sure the arrow or cross is over the eyes, press it and then it will change it to the real colour of the eyes. I have a Mac so I know how to do it on that one, but Windows have an equivalent.
@jaiho2009 (36779)
• Philippines
5 Oct 12
I don't think this is true. I have observed this with my pictures and my other siblings. It is because we have light brown eyes, so our eyes glows with pictures especially during night or in dark places, while people with black eyes don't.
@ShepherdSpy (8565)
• Omagh, Northern Ireland
5 Oct 12
The "Redeye" effect in photography is quite normal,though undesirable! I think what your friend is concerned about IS correct,it's just that she's got the wrong end of the stick..Redeye IS Normal,it's just direct camera flash reflecting,like cats eyes do..but like She's worried about,there are conditions that will affect the retina of the eye and can show up in photos..but usually,it would be only ONE eye that's affected,so the difference can be identified and investigated and treated once discovered...