Perception and Reality

Australia
November 8, 2012 6:34pm CST
When I was involved in the HIV/AIDS movement, and the Pagan movement, it seemed that everybody in the world was involved, and we felt immense optimism about the things that concerned us. Of course we later discovered that the only "world" that was involved was our own, very limited little world of AIDS care or Paganism, and that the rest of the real world couldn't give a tinker's. It occurs to me that MyLot is somewhat similar. If we take the perception from here that Republicanism is overwhelmingly popular, particularly in its virulent zealot form, we'd want to either run around cheering or consider slashing our wrists depending on our stance in the right/left debate. But now the election is over, and Obama has had a convincing win. In the aftermath I heard a number of Republicans talking about the next four years, people who will be heavily involved in the action unlike the wannabes here, like the leader of the house, and I realised that what we get here in MyLot is a bunch of zealots whose realistic connection with mainstream Republican thought is at best somewhat tenuous, and at worst well out in left field. Or should that be right field? I will not be getting involved in future with the discussions which revolve around the "thoughts" of the handful of loudly outspoken Republican zealots who prowl these forums, and we all know who they are, because I don't need that level of frustration any more, and getting pissed with them is simply not good for my soul. So, hopefully the more reasoned folk with political points of view, including reasonable Republican supporters, can give this idea some serious thought, and join in a tacit boycott of not the discussions, but the negative and bigoted meanderings of this fervour of zealots. Lash
2 people like this
9 responses
@Rollo1 (16725)
• Boston, Massachusetts
9 Nov 12
"Obama has had a convincing win" - Disagree. He had a very narrow win. "mainstream Republican thought" - I didn't know you were the arbiter of Republican thought. Funny, you would think Americans would be better versed in our political system than an Aussie... "I will not be getting involved in future with the discussions which revolve around the "thoughts" of the handful of loudly outspoken Republican zealots who prowl these forums" - and we thank you for it from the bottom of our zealous little hearts.
1 person likes this
• United States
9 Nov 12
I'm not sure what media says about it in other countries (that are undoubtedly favorable to Obama to begin with nonetheless), but the EC numbers pile up after losing by only 1 or 2% in key states holding a lot of Electoral votes. But, then again, maybe one's definition of "convincingly" is different. That could mean carried in more states, or even simply reelected despite the debt and unemployment situation.
1 person likes this
@debrakcarey (19925)
• United States
9 Nov 12
The electoral map looked mighty red to me.
1 person likes this
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
9 Nov 12
What about the democrat zealots? Is their zeal any less repulsive than the republican's, or do you only target the right because you lean left?
1 person likes this
• Australia
10 Nov 12
If you weren't so lazy you'd have seen that twice in this discussion I have said that all sides of politics have their zealots. Follow the guidelines and read the responses before swallowing your feet. You would also have seen that I am not left wing, I am Green. Lash
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
10 Nov 12
Oh yes, you really gave it to those Democrats, "Oh I agree, the radical Left is no better than the zealous Right." That's telling them. Why didn't you include them in your posted rant if they are no better? Why only mention the Republicans? Who do you think you're kidding with this lame attempt to show equal criticism of each side? And as usual, you can't defend yourself so you resort to insults. I would think someone with a PhD would be able to give a better response. Obviously, where you're concerned, I'm wrong. Green is just as liberal as the left wing.
1 person likes this
@debrakcarey (19925)
• United States
9 Nov 12
We ALL choose our worldview. And to stand by what we believe. THAT is what makes the world go round so to speak. Just what will we all do when it beomes illegal to INSULT one another as was purposed in the UN recently?
1 person likes this
@matersfish (6311)
• United States
9 Nov 12
Well, you're not the first to grace us all with a longwinded swan song, waxing all proper about being above the common fray and beyond petty opinion. You'll be back.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Nov 12
Are Republican zealots really unreasonable, or are you just unable to challenge them because you don't have a better answer? If you're point of view is better or more reasonable than the Republican zealot's, surely you can out debate them. Yes, it can be frustrating when dealing with certain people, but what will the undecided people think if you give up? Do the zealots win by default?
• Australia
11 Nov 12
For the record: I was raised in a conservative religious family, considered taking religious orders, went to an exclusive upper-crust school, and have only ever voted Left once in my life. Many of the conservative values I once held I had shucked because age, maturity, education, and experience showed me that they were wrong; many of the "liberal" attitudes I espoused in the 70s have also gone the same way for the same reasons; I have become militantly anti-religion (but not necessarily anti-faith and belief); again through the same processes. It is the inflexibility of mostly conservatives (but not all conservatives) and some "liberals" and left-wingers that I deplore. When I talk about nutcases I am referring not to all religious folk, or even most of them, just to the fundamentalist zealots of whom many appear to live in MyLot. Ditto with conservatives, I am attacking only the inflexible zealots. Lash
@debrakcarey (19925)
• United States
12 Nov 12
Yet when the zealots 'attack' you call them reactionary?
@debrakcarey (19925)
• United States
12 Nov 12
Are you sure you're not still in that little bubble of optimism? it seemed that everybody in the world was involved, and we felt immense optimism about the things that concerned us.
• United States
9 Nov 12
I think that their are zealots and bigots on both sides of the political spectrum. I nearly liked Romney when he was in one of his more moderate moods, but when he started going way too far right is when I began to dislike him. His running mate terrified me; I don't think he had as much faith in becoming VP since he won his old Congressional seat. I was in a very heated argument not too long ago, but after the two of us went back and forth, we realized that we *could* come together when we softened our views. I'd like to think that we both learned from one another in the process too. But there's one or two people that really need to stay away from me (or I from them) because they get my back up and start attacking without hearing the entire story. I'd be terrified if they ever became Supreme Court justices...
• Australia
9 Nov 12
I'd agree, there are a couple here with whom I have heated exchanges, but I respect him/her? for the degree of reasoned argument even when I disagree with the conclusions drawn. But there are some whose knee-jerk reflex and disregard for reason make them simply not worth talking to. By the way, you know more about your system than I do, is a probable 332 - 206 victory for Obama (unless something really odd happens in Florida - again) a convincing win, or a close one? Lash
• United States
9 Nov 12
That's the electoral college vote; I think that the close vote referred to was the popular vote, but it was still a couple of million difference. I'm learning to avoid certain people-and I hate when they jump on one of the discussions I've started. I'll just have to learn to just thank them for their contribution and move on.
• Australia
9 Nov 12
Yes, I understand, but from many comments here by people from all sides of politics, the popular vote is essentially meaningless so far as electing the president goes. It may influence the college, but they don't have to follow it, or am I mistaken in that belief? Lash
• United States
9 Nov 12
Well said. I am kinda new to mylot, but I resonated with the kinds of things I see on Facebook. Since I am from an evangelical Christian background, a lot of my contacts from that make me feel that America is a certain way (and one which makes me scared). There are trolls on both the right and left, but it is comforting to know that neither make up the majority. I wonder what happened to the HIV/AIDS movement?
• Australia
9 Nov 12
It's still there and active, but the media have got over it and it is now in the background. If you've never seen one of the AIDS Quilts I strongly suggest you do so if you get the chance, but make sure you take a big box of tissues with you. Lash
• United States
9 Nov 12
I will look out for it. Honestly, this is the first I have heard of it!
@yoyo1198 (3644)
• United States
10 Nov 12
During the last few days of the campaign the myLot zealots ramped up their vitriol and seemed almost to be in a panic. I avoided all political discussions as I had been already inundated with both sides of every argument (or 'debate' for a milder connotation). Now with the election over and the results being given some of the same flavor, I'll do the same, staying far away from the lopsided reasonings.
@asyria51 (2870)
• United States
9 Nov 12
Well said, and I tend to agree. While it is the Republicans who dominate this forum. I belong to another forum where it is the radical left that voice the most opinions, and they seem to be so far off base from mainstream politics that it is laughable, yet people can't seem to stop themselves from rising to the bait. I tend to be middle of the road and a true independent. Most of my local ticket was single party, or running unopposed, but for the positions that there was more than one candidate I was split based on what I had seen of the incumbent. In the past, I held the idea that if I did not like the way things were going, oust everyone and start over, but the lack on continuity, would be devastating to politics as a whole, because there is a learning curve, and if everyone started new, I think that curve would be harder on the constituents.
• Australia
9 Nov 12
Oh I agree, the radical Left is no better than the zealous Right, and the truly radical Greens (my own party of choice) are some of the biggest ratbags in politics. It is extremism that this discussion is about, and that is not unique to the Republicans/Tories. Lash