A simple comma ( , ) that changed the meaning.

January 25, 2013 7:18am CST
In the book or the gospel of Mark 16:9 it is written thus, "Now when Jesus was RISEN early the first day of the WEEK, he appeared to Mary Magdalene..." (KJV and most of Bible translations). Where do you think the simple comma should be placed? Will it be right after the word WEEK or it or should be placed right after the word RISEN? Your answer will determined which day the Lord Jesus was resurrected. But the big question will be, can you proved it?
4 responses
@owlwings (38157)
• Cambridge, England
25 Jan 13
The pertinent question is, "Does it matter what day of the week the Resurrection happened?"
1 person likes this
@iuliuxd (4453)
• Romania
25 Jan 13
I think it matters a lot. I don`t think what he asked matters because we know Jesus was buried 3 days but the day of Resurrection is important.
1 person likes this
2 Feb 13
Hi owlwings/iuliuxd greetings. I think majority of the christian world will agree with your simple statements. At least, you do believed that Jesus' resurrection was a fact regardless of which day this happened. You are most certainly welcome. It is just interesting to note that owlwings figuratively placed the simple comma right after the word RISEN thereby the day of resurrection was not given which rightly correspond to his response.
@owlwings (38157)
• Cambridge, England
2 Feb 13
Commas (and other punctuation) are a relatively modern invention. The New Testament Greek, in which the Gospels were written and from which our English translations are made, relied upon context and common usage for clarity of meaning. It is later translations, therefore, which have added the comma and, while translators are experts and can be relied upon to give the meaning of the original Greek, it should be remembered that typesetters are NOT experts and that a comma may easily be misplaced without authority. The second point worth noting is that verses 9 to 20 do not appear in all copies of Mark, particularly in some of the earliest extant versions and it is thought by many that this passage (and the rest of the ending) is a later addition which may not have been written by Mark and may therefore not be part of the Gospel or, indeed, reliable at all. It is worth reading what is said on the subject here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_16
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@PastorP (1174)
• United States
31 Jan 13
The only comma that I see in the Greek text I have here is after Mary Magdalene. As a result, using the KJV, it would read something like, "Now when Jesus was risen early the first day of the week He appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had cast seven devils."
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2 Feb 13
Hi PastorP greetings. My sincere appreciation in responding to my presented discussion. I thought (as I have written to marcmm above) that commas are NOT given to any of the original Greek writtings. It seems to be I am believing a lie all these years only to find out from you that there is a Greek text with a comma(s) after all. Not wanting to surrender easily I tried to look for the Greek version of the same verse and it was thus written; anastas de proi prote sabbatou ephane proton maria te magdalene aph hes ekbeblekei hepta daimonia Still, I find no comma(s). All the best mangtony.
@PastorP (1174)
• United States
5 Feb 13
mangtony7451, I've found something! The following is from Neil R. Lightfoot's How We Got The Bible p28: "When the New Testament was first written the literary style was that of uncial character. This means that the letters of the apostles were inscribed in large letters, without intervening spaces between the words, and with no marks of punctuation."
6 Feb 13
Great PastorP sir. It only shows that besides the absence of commas or any punctuation marks in the original Greek writings of the Bible, it was also written in uncial characters or capital letters. Again thank you very much and God Bless.
• United States
2 Feb 13
I think that if the comma were put after "Risen" that it would leave the reader wondering when did he rise. It could have been Saturday morning. For some who may not be a Bible student it could be that he rose Sunday morning and didn't see her until Monday since they believe that Monday is the first day of the week. Or did he rise Monday and saw her on the same day which would be the first day of the week. I am thinking it is better where it is.
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3 Feb 13
Hi Hopefull90, greetings. My appreciation for sharing your comment. Although I am a little bit confused about your statement that Monday is considered as the first day of the week by those who may not be a Bible student. The resurrection of the Lord Jesus is of paramount importance as far as God's plan of salvation is concerned. And not only that, it is also the ONLY SIGN given by the Lord Jesus to those who are seeking for the real, the one and only much awaited Christ or Messiah (Mat.12:40, pls. read and try to count/compare what you think is better ). Simply stated, Majority in the christian world believed that the plan of salvation is finished at the cross of Cavalry. Not really. For proof of this you may want to read the whole chapter of I Cor. 15, and Romans 5:10, "...we shall be saved by his life" or his resurrection. All the best mangtony.
• United States
3 Feb 13
THere are many who consider Monday as the first day of the week. I have seen calendars where Monday starts the week out. I have seen on T.V. where they had Monday as the first day of the week.
@buenavida (7671)
• Sweden
25 Jan 13
Why not compare different translations in biblegateway.com and here is an accurate translation directly from the Greek text. http://www.jw.org/en/publications/bible/mark/16#v-9 It looks like this verse, however, is a part of a longer conclusion of Mark. The shorter conclusion is above. Until we know for sure, both conclusions are there.. Let's keep studying..
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2 Feb 13
Hi buenavida greetings. Maybe you haven't noticed in my above discussion, KJV and most or majority of Bible translations placed the simple comma right after the word WEEK instead of the word RISEN. Your reference link neither placed the simple comma on both words but only after the word MAGDALENE. Moreover, the issue is not on the short or longer version of the book of Mark but on a simple comma that changed the meaning of the verse like the one in Luke 23:43. You are absolutely right in saying my dear friend, "until we know for sure...Let's keep studying". That's why I am Still fascinated by your used of words, "accurate translation" and in the past "accurate knowledge". All this I say in love. All the best mangtony.