I feel like boasting that I made this most wonderful taste.

@thea09 (18305)
Greece
December 6, 2009 10:46am CST
For the first time in my life I made marmalade today, cheating a bit of course as actually cooking it in the breamaker on the jam cylcle. It is the best best best marmalade I have ever tasted which is why I'm boasting. Fresh oranges and lemons straight from the trees, with the addition of grated ginger, and voila. Well not quite. Not quite as it appeared way too runny and quite pale but smelled divine. I filled tree jars and looked at it to see if it would set which it wouldn't. So a quick call to a friend who advised to let it boil in a large pan to evaportate some of the fruit liquid and perfection is the result. A deep rich coloured marmalade which is now set. Once the large quantities of oranges arrive and I've got some jars in this should sell like a dream. What kind of fruits have you tried in marmalades? What preserving marvels have you felt like boasting about?
8 people like this
24 responses
@GardenGerty (156229)
• United States
6 Dec 09
Last year I made a wonderful red pepper jelly. My first batch did not set up, and I mixed it in with brown mustard for a heavenly sweet hot sauce, second batch boiled longer, did better. I need to make more soon, I am sure.
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
Hi Gerty, there's no way I could get that far with red peppers. Once they are roasted they are just too good to turn into jelly, it's straight into a marinade and eaten. They are just so good. I used to make them into roasted red pepper and tomato soup. What do you actually put the jelly with though, I've never heard of it being used that way?
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
Really Gerty, that must really be a different way of using them. I've always known them more as a something to accompany a meat dish, like a mint jelly with lamb, or a spoon of cranberry jelly with turkey. Never heard of them being used on top of things seriously. Certainly never on toast. It's strange the ways countries really do have such different ways with foods.
@vandana7 (98119)
• India
7 Dec 09
This is the one I want to try thea. :) Thanks GardenGerty for suggesting this. Does it have to be sweet sauce? Ah well, I am ok with tomato sauce so why not. :)
1 person likes this
@cream97 (29087)
• United States
6 Dec 09
Hi, thea09! That is wonderful! I have never made marmalade before. The only thing that I have tried in marmalade would be the strawberry preserves. I would love to be able to try a sweet homemade marmalade. I am sure that it taste really good
2 people like this
@GardenGerty (156229)
• United States
6 Dec 09
This time of year I get into making things with cranberries. I am sure you do not get those as they like cold and wet conditions, mostly. I have five pounds in my refrigerator. You boil about three cups berries with one cup sugar and one cup water which has boiled. Bring all to a boil for ten full minutes, and then put in refrigerator containers. I have also used orange juice and rind in it, and also have used apples in it. All good and tart.
2 people like this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
Hi cream, although the Greek word for jams and marmalades is 'marmalatha' strawberry preseves are jam and only citrus fruits are mamalade. Mine is not at all sweet, a good traditional thick cut marmalade should be slightly bitter and this is. I'm sure it could easily be made sweet though if sweeter oranges were used and no lemons. It sure is wonderful though, and no messing around like the cook books say with scum and thermometres.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
Thanks for making me jealous there Gerty, we both love cranberries but we don't get them over here. I found a tin of them in town when they were promoting foreign foods for a christmas line but they were a bit pricey. I'm keeping them in for a day when the fresh fruit is low and then I'll let my son indulge.
@p1kef1sh (45681)
6 Dec 09
Back in 1958 a delightful young fruit was carefully nurtured, grown and preserved. Over the years it became at first sharp and acid and then mellowed into a mature and precious middle aged spread. But enough about me..................
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
Hi plfeflsh, are you seriously offering yourself up to one of my preserving jars? Would you prefer to be boiled alive with sugar or do you think the addition of anything extra may enhance your taste.
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
A typo
@p1kef1sh (45681)
6 Dec 09
"P1kelade" an acquired taste but a memorable one!
1 person likes this
@ANTIQUELADY (36440)
• United States
6 Dec 09
U have a right to boast & to be able to pick your fruit right off the trees sounds wonderful. I have never cared for marmalade, i don't know why because i love lemons & oranges. It's just my silliness, i guess. I always preserve everything i can in the summer. It sure comes in handy to have it right at home. Smart girl!!
1 person likes this
@ANTIQUELADY (36440)
• United States
6 Dec 09
u KNOW I'D HELP U ANYWAY I COULD.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
I know, thanks.
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
Hi Aunty, I shall come to you for preserving tips then. I'm sure you'd like my marmalade but maybe not, personally I don't care for jam. I only tried a small quantity today but just wait till the Greeks fifty trees are ready to pick. The trees up there will be a different variety of oranges than the ones here so there should end up being a good variety of tastes.
1 person likes this
@malpoa (1216)
• India
8 Dec 09
I grew up in a compound where we hd more than 5 types of mangoes. In one mango season me and my sister decided to make some jam. We pureed pulp of 10 mangoes and started teh unending thing. It took years and years to get the final product. To my utter patience, I burned my tounge and fingers many times!!! And to make things miserable, the final quantity was just a handful of jam which got finished by the same night!!! then my sister vowed not to cook any thing such laborious as like she said, cooking takes six hours and to eat it not even 6 mins. hi hi. Both of us havent tried to make anything like that again... I love orange peel marmalade and want to try it out one day.
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
8 Dec 09
Hi Malpoa, good to see you back my dear. Your mango experience sounds like mine with the artichokes, hours of careful peeling and being stabbed only to have them all go mouldy on me after two days. So much for preserved hearts. I'd definitely give up if I got a handful of jam for all that effort. I've just got one lot cooking in the machine now, it took my 45 minutes to prepare it all, peeling and chopping oranges,lemons,a grapefruit and grating ginger. Then I prepared another lot which will go in as soon as the machine beeps. That took about the same preparation time. I need to find a faster way to peel oranges. Oh I also chopped lots of the peel to go in. I will either go out later with it to drum up some custom or more probably tomorrowI. If I can sell it for what expect it turn in a most excellent profit as we picked all the fruit for free yesterday. That time doesn't count as it was just having fun with my son.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
9 Dec 09
I have some in jars now and will take it out later but then must wait until I can buy some jars. The good way would obviously be to finance the jars and sugar from the first lot of profits. I did ask a few English couples who are supposed to be mad about this tradtional kind of marmalade which is rarely found here if they were interested, but they all requested strawberry jam instead.Strawberries are funnily enough not in season in December but I suppose I could consider it for the strawberry season.
1 person likes this
@malpoa (1216)
• India
10 Dec 09
You can use plastic bags instead of bottles. It will reduce the initial investment cost. If plastic bags are allowed there that is. Or you can ask the customers to bring utensil but you need to have digital weighing machine then. Strawberry jams, I have the faintest idea how it would taste. I have this dislike for that overrated fruit. It looks great, but tastes not that good. here it is expensive too like for 15 medium sized ones, they charge 1 1/2$. I once tried a pudding with this and yougurt, it turned out very bad!!! I like it pureed and have it with a cup of milk. Your son might like it. Just 2 tbsp puree with a cup of milk...or he may not because it is pink in colour!!! hi hi
@Louc74 (620)
6 Dec 09
Well done, Thea. I've never attempted preserves as of yet, but both of my Grans used to make excellent jam. They had bramble bushes in their gardens, one also grew strawberries, and the other gooseberries. I wasn't too keen on the gooseberry jam variety, but those who were said it was excellent. My dad recently bought himself a bread maker, so I'm going to have to stick my nose in and see if his has the jam making facility as well! Then I can use his kitchen to make a big mess of! Lol!
2 people like this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
Well that was the beauty of the bread maker Lou, no mess at all. The only bit was sticky fingers cutting up all the oranges. I'm not a jam fan so probably won't bother with that but have always been a marmalade on toast type so the home made stuff on homemade bread is really cool. The marmalade took a lot longer than the bread to prepare though, over half an hour. I'm definitely going to see if it would sell though as it is better than any bought stuff - working on my profit margin now which only has to have the price of jars factored in.
@stvasile (7306)
• Romania
6 Dec 09
Marmalade is usually made out of plums around here, but my mother never made plum marmalade, as plum trees don't grow very well in the southern plain area, where I live. However, my mother made a very good marmalade out of grapes. The grapes are squeezed on some screens to keep out the seeds and the skins and let through the pulp and juice. The resulting juice is left to boil and absolutely no sugar is added - the (red) grapes are sweet enough. When it cools down, the resulting paste sets very well.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
Hi stvasile, the grape jam sounds good but alas we have no red grapes in this region at all, just green ones. I wouldn't be tempted by plums at all as really only like the citrus fruits made into marmalade but I'll definitely go for a fig concoction next fig season. I'm more suprised though that your mother hasn't come up with a herb concotion to taunt you with, perhaps to spread on top of bread and cheese, but she is obviously too kind to you and uses them in other ways.
1 person likes this
@stvasile (7306)
• Romania
6 Dec 09
Yup, my mother never forgets the herbs, but she keeps them in the pickle jars, she never added them to jams so far.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
7 Dec 09
You must give me her email address so I can recommend a few herbed jams.
1 person likes this
• Australia
7 Dec 09
Congratulations Thea. You are getting value from your bread machine, and if you sell the marmalade, it will more than pay for itself. Of course, you realise the main reason it is so good is because you added ginger, don't you. Ginger improves the taste of just about everything.
1 person likes this
• Australia
7 Dec 09
I'm sure the smaller amount of sugar would be better. Were you able to get the right kind of sugar?
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
7 Dec 09
Hi Cloud, what would a good marmalade be without ginger. Actually I've just found out the reason why mine tastes so good. Sticking to the breadmaker quantities it called for 1000g of fruit to 500g of sugar. Leafing through some cookery books now for ideas for variations they use 1000g of fruit to 2000g of sugar. That's the reason why mine has such a strong natural flavour I think.
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
7 Dec 09
No. I used white granulated, couldn't find any pectin, and settled on a box printed in German which I don't read which had a pot of jam on the packet. Someone had stuck a Greek note on it saying it was for jams and to put a sachet in with the sugar, so I played safe and added half being clueless to what it actually was. But then today I found in one of my books how to make ones one pectin from pips, pith and peel, but apart from the pips all the rest ended up in the bread maker anyway, with some peel reserved to add to a fruit bread.
1 person likes this
@zandi458 (28102)
• Malaysia
6 Dec 09
I always like the bitter sweet taste of orange marmalade but have not tried my hands in making it myself. Since oranges are our imported fruits, it is quite costly here but our local fruits which are in abundance make good marmalade too. Should try it out one of these days. Good that you have successfully made your homemade marmalade which I think can be commercialized under your own brand name.
• Australia
7 Dec 09
FIGS! Now a home made fig jam/marmalade/conserve whatever, would almost be worth the trip over there to buy some!
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
7 Dec 09
A short fig season this year so hoping it is longer next year.
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
Hi zandi, I have to say I'm enormously pleased especially as the marmalde sold here is of the thin kind and too sweet, and the thick cut variety is imported and very expensive. If I was paying for fruit though I wouldn't have been tempted to do it and this time I'll even be able to produce jars for those who always kindly keep me stocked up with fruit in the first place. I will definitely enjoy next years fig season in the bread maker.
@pergammano (7682)
• Canada
7 Dec 09
Congrats...girl! You have me wondering, tho...seeings you are thinking of going businesslike, if this wonderful new machine will stand up to the constant usage? And I am also wondering if a "slow cooker" might be the answer to making huge batches for re-sale! You go...girl! My absolute Marmalade is GINGER...yes, just GINGER! And I have NO self-recriminations if I overindulge in it...as I appease myself with all of GInger's health benefits...LOL! I also do like all Marmalades..but also do like the 3 fruit, lemon, orange and grapefruit! HUGZ & Cheers!
1 person likes this
• Canada
9 Dec 09
I am wondering, thea...if your local bakery wouldn't be a great place to sell your wonderful marmalade! I would jump at the chance, whilst smelling the lovely fresh baked bread...to include a jar of marmalade...One conjures up thoughts of the other! I am wondering how we can get past your "pectin" problem, so will do some research (which will be good for me..and keep my mind off things.) I have learned something new from you...you are making marmalade from a variety of species of oranges! The one thing we line up here for...is Seville oranges, which we only get about end of January, beginning of Feb., and then all scurry to make our marmalade! Will sourcing jars be a complication? HUGZ & Cheers!
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
9 Dec 09
Hi Shirley, well I was rather hoping to do it without a middleman cutting into my profits but I did think of the bakery in the fishing village, they could at least serve it to those who want toast for breakfast. I've heard of a shop up in town which should sell jamjars so that's lined up for Saturday when I pass through town next. I did find something in a cookbook about how to make pectin but just boiling it all up in a pan for a little bit afterwards worked a treat yesterday with the two lots I did. No more now though until new jars are available. The Greek said we can get oranges from up there now and they must be another different variety. As far as I know no one has seville orange trees. What I could do with discovering is a quicker way to peel oranges, yesterday I took to the knife method by slitting the skin in 4 places but still couldn't reduce the total preparation time of fruit and ginger to under 45 minutes. I peel and cut the fruit, chop a lot of the rind, leave the pith on. There must be a quicker way but it's something I've never done before.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
7 Dec 09
Hi Shirley, well I shall make sure people want to buy it first but we've just spent a couple of hours collecting oranges and lemons - I'd forgotten until this morning that a local friend who is in Australia for part of the year told me to go round and help myself so I was most delighted to find a huge lemon tree in fruit. So it will only cost me sugar,ginger and jars. The machine only took 1hr 20 minutes and I know if I'd done it all in a pan it would have burnt and stuck. I don't have a slow cooker but consider one from the marmalade profits. Apparently the English ex pats will be most interested in my marmalade. The trouble is with the Greeks every time I think of potential customers I realise I'd have to give it to them rather than sell it. One taverna has promised to buy though.I shall cook up a storm tomorrow but will then have to wait until I can source some jam jars. Hope you're taking it easy today, big hugs.
1 person likes this
• Australia
7 Dec 09
I'm not a preserve person, but it is certain that home-grown and cooked food is far and away the best you can have. There are probably whole generations of modern kids who would think i'm crazy, lol, but what do they know? They think the plastic rubbish the supermarkets sell is fruit. We grow a lot of sweet basil, mainly for salads and risottos, but we had so much of it growing that I decided to do a traditional pesto, ground in a pestle, and eaten fresh with pasta. Even the parmesan cheese added to the mixture was fresh ground, as was the rock salt, and the roasted pine nuts were straight out of the frying pan. It was, if I do say so myself, magnifique. No matter how well cooked commercial ones are, the preservatives invariably leave a slightly bitter taste, and although some degree of "steeping" is good for many dishes, sitting in a sealed container for who knows how long is a bit more than mere "steeping". With my weight problems I don't dare get into preserve or even dessert cooking. I lack the "self-control gene". Lash
1 person likes this
@vandana7 (98119)
• India
7 Dec 09
Me too. Even I have tough time to control myself when it comes to eating. :) But I am giving myself some time. If I survive 2012 December, then I promise all mylottes I will go on a diet to reduce my weight. :) 2012 at least gives me an excuse to avoid dieting. :) Nice to see you here grandpa_lash, and though I dont know any of those dishes that you mention, I bet they are nice because there is no sugar in them. I like only two things that have sugar, cakes, and ice creams, rest are something I wouldnt want to be near. :) I love pickles. :)
@cynthiann (18602)
• Jamaica
7 Dec 09
Didn't want to do it but had to learn how to preserve meat in 1988. A horrible hurricane came and we were without electricity for 3 months. Had to learn to make a brine to preserve meat for the week and all sorts of things that I really had no interest in learning about. Like using an iron that held hot coals and we ironed clothing with this. I couldn't manage it so we gave it back to the tailor that kindly loaned it to us. We then collected old electric and flat irons and we would put them all on the gas burners of the gas stoves to heat. And then I learnt the truth of having 'too many irons in the fire' as I would forget which one I had put down to get hot again and it was all very confusing. Yes, I did know about generators but we were wiped out fiancially as all of our bananas fell down and we could not afford to buy one. So I waited for 3 months.......
1 person likes this
@cynthiann (18602)
• Jamaica
7 Dec 09
I learnt that even if you look hard at a banana it will fall down. Oh I had to keep ironing as the children wore clean shirts daily to school and the daughter wore a dress daily too, and I was working. They would have been frightfully embarrassed and my reputation in a village would have nose dived. In the end I employed someone to do the ironing (I already had some one doing the washing) I just cut doswn on everything else to poay them. No way was I going to the river to do washing
1 person likes this
@cynthiann (18602)
• Jamaica
7 Dec 09
should have said that #3 son did urchase a generator me me to use in cases of power cuts. I do so appeciate it but it seems to gobble up gas so I only use it for extended power cuts!! Good thing to have in a hurricane though
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
7 Dec 09
Three months Cynthiann. At least you had gas to cook your preserved meat on. I'm amazed that you bothered to keep on ironing though, I'd have sent everyone out in rumpled clothes no question. I just learnt last week that in the high villages in Romania they don't have electric to this day and preserve the meat in rivers. With the many power cuts we experience each winter I'd love to have a back up generator but it won't happen, but I would really like to get a back up water tank before next summer. Sorry about your bananas.
1 person likes this
@RawBill1 (8531)
• Gold Coast, Australia
6 Dec 09
Congratulations Thea,well done! It sounds delicious. I have not had any experience doing things like this, but it is great to see you doing some old fashioned home made foods instead of buying from the stores while fruit wastes on the ground like many others would do!
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
Thanks Bill, and I was amazed that it did taste so much better than any I've ever bought. The Greek has 50 trees of oranges so I intend to put quite a lot to good use and sell the end result as the ex pats should be impressed with the taste and maybe a few Greeks would fancy it too but are not well known for spreading things on their bread. Actually you wouldn't believe the amount of rotting fruit on the ground, there are orange trees everywhere street side in town and the fruit falls off but no one knows who it belongs to.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
@RawBill1 (8531)
• Gold Coast, Australia
6 Dec 09
Such a waste of good food! I am glad that you have access to so many trees. That would be awesome! I hope it goes well for you and that you can turn it into a successful little business!
2 people like this
• United States
9 Dec 09
So glad to hear that your marmalade turned out so well, thea! Adding ginger sounds delicious! I've never had it that way before and I adore ginger. I've never tried making jam or marmalade before, though several ladies in my family do it every year with peaches and pears. I also used to have a great-aunt who could make a jam using a little bit of fruit and a whole lot of squash - and you'd never know you were eating a spoonful of squash on your toast! It was a great way to get rid of all the squash we're overrun with every summer. Though I've never tried canning (in jars :) ), I do preserve by freezing and dehydrating. I freeze excess garden veggies in the summer, and dehydrate all sorts of fruit when they are in season. I also do the same with produce when it is on sale at the store or the produce stand up the road. Home dried fruit is super tasty, but I can hardly boast, because all I really do is cut up the fruit, lay it on trays, and flip the switch - no skill necessary. Dried fruit is always one of the goodies I include in Christmas baskets. Congratulations again on your marmalade and for putting all those oranges to good use!
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
9 Dec 09
Hi celestialbloom, thanks for your kind words. Indeed it always makes sense to preserve what we have an abundance of but I've still not got around to drying anything. There's always enough fresh fruit around to not need to dry it, though I do buy dried raisins for fruit cakes (and fruit bread now too). I shall dry some of the peel I'm using though to add to fruit loaves. Now you've confused me somewhat, you cut it, lay it on trays, but then what switch do you flip? Do you have some kind of machine to dry it for you or just leave it on trays. This question is with my peel in mind of course. I keep regretting that I didn't freeze plenty of basil leaves in the summer as dried just isn't the same. Before I was freezing fresh mint leaves in ice cube trays but then when I realised it was dying off for the summer I froze it in bags, big mistake, as now I have huge clump of them together when I want a few. But it's reminded me to make some mint tea later.
1 person likes this
@zed_k4 (17589)
• Singapore
7 Dec 09
Perfect, Thea. Maybe next off, you can start to create a home-made meringue for me. LOL.. I'd love to have some. Anyway, marmalade reminds me of Lady Marmalade the song. So, do you have any music on while you get to perfect your dessert skills there? Awesome..
@zed_k4 (17589)
• Singapore
7 Dec 09
By the way, I've put on the avatar just for you..
1 person likes this
@zed_k4 (17589)
• Singapore
8 Dec 09
Thea, I want to be a spoiled brat and having someone to make meringues for me...LOL. As for intense Goran here, he's an actor, right? He looks like an actor, and doubt that he's a singer or an artist... Maybe I should feature different Goran looks every now and then. In the meantime, enjoy this one first. Thanks for suggesting it; I do have itchy fingers so now I know where to put those fingers into place..
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
7 Dec 09
Ahh my wonderful Zed, you are letting Goran stay on. It's rare to see him looking less than stern and intellectual. I did ask you somewhere else today if you actually know who he is? Great great picture you found though. If you want to know how to make meringues you only need to ask. They are actually very easy, especially if you have an electric mixer, and are nothing more than egg whites and sugar. I refuse to be tempted, just the thought of all that sugar makes my teeth ache.
1 person likes this
@mentalward (14691)
• United States
6 Dec 09
Awesome, thea! Congratulations! Isn't it wonderful to chow down on something we made ourselves? I've never tried using my bread machine for marmalade. Heck, I don't use my bread machine to make bread! LOL I still use the old-fashioned method. One day I might try the bread machine. I've never tried making my own marmalades but can I come over? I'll bring toast! Hey, I'll make home-made bread just for the occasion! I used to make grape jelly with my mother. She used pectin to set the jelly. I remember it being the best tasting jelly around! I plan to be making my own jellies one of these days. I've planted apple, plum and peach trees plus grape vines in the past 2 years so, as soon as they produce enough fruit, I'll be getting busy. Where do you sell your wares? I've thought about doing that myself. A lot of folks around here love homemade things, including foods but I wouldn't have the first clue as to how to sell them.
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
Hi Marti, I shall head down to the cafenion in the village with a jar and a spoon and see how many request the stuff. There are a lot of ex pats here who usually want English kinds of things and thick cut marmalade I would think would be one of them and is very expensive here plus not as good as mine. So I'll see what business I can drum up that way. But I'm waiting for the sacks of free oranges first from the Greek. But I've always been able to sell anything so I just need some jars and a huge vat of sugar. I'll see you in the morning then for toast and marmalade Marti. Can you believe I've only had the breadmaker 2 weeks and put on 2 kilos.
@ZephyrSun (7381)
• United States
6 Dec 09
Hmmmm....I buy them in the store since I don't know how to make that sort of stuff and I've yet to see a bread maker that makes jam/jelly/marmalade whichever you prefer.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
6 Dec 09
Hi Zeph, completely easy in the bread maker. Nothing like the old fashioned way of boiling up vast pots of the stuff and straining the scum off. Half an hour of chopping and peeling the fruit then into the machine and done with. The stuff I like in the shops marmalade wise I don't buy, as it is imported and very expensive.
@PeacefulWmn9 (10420)
• United States
7 Dec 09
Kudos, Thea :)) Making our own "anything" is great fun. I used to love to make strawberry and blackberry freezer jam, and I've canned for the winter in the past almost anything that can be grown and harvested from the garden. I make great home-canned bread and butter pickles, too :)) Again, congrats. I love marmalade, especially orange. It is wonderful on hot toast, corn muffins, or rolls. Karen
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
7 Dec 09
Hi Karen, very satisfying I think when one does it the first time and it works. I always associated jam making with a long drawn out venture like it used to be when my mum did it but this was so easy and does taste better than any I've tasted before. I'm not a jam fan so will stick with my marmalade but must find some jars to price up and then go out and get some orders with a tast test sample.
@vandana7 (98119)
• India
7 Dec 09
Hi karen, please give me recipe of some simple dish which doesnt have sugar or has very little of it, which is sour and pungent. I dont mind cheese included. :) Thea recommends your dishes, and I have already received a good hint from you. So please share. :) Thanks in advance. :)
1 person likes this
@vandana7 (98119)
• India
7 Dec 09
By the way, I am a vegetarian. So nothing that moves goes down my gullet. :)
1 person likes this
@vandana7 (98119)
• India
6 Dec 09
Sweets. . Pickles. . Mangoes, ginger, tomatoes, chillies, and lemon. :) Pickles are god's gift to mankind. At least I think so. If they were not there, I would be at least 30 kgs. less. :)
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
7 Dec 09
Hi Vandana, I love your pickle obsession but there's no way pickles can add calories. Is there? My marmalade with lemons and ginger added just might be sour and bitter enough to pass your taste test. I must get some pickled olives from the best olive pickler soon, I tasted them in the making but they were still soaking in olive oil and were way too bitter, as olives are before they are fully ready.
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
7 Dec 09
Oh you should pop down to box 18 and ask Karen about her bread and butter pickles,it could be a new one for you.
@vandana7 (98119)
• India
7 Dec 09
But thanks thea. I got some ideas to prepare some of those spicy stuff from local peppers. :)
• India
7 Dec 09
yes i would like to introduced the fruits like oranges and mengos which i have tried in mamalades. yaa i don't know more about preserving marvelous
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18305)
• Greece
7 Dec 09
Hi hitenkumarp, I know that there is many ways to use mangoes there, I have a friend here from India who has them pickled. They don't grow here though but are imported, but I like to use the fruits straight from the trees.