Poisonous Plants Headed North

@LindaOHio (6812)
United States
July 11, 2019 6:01pm CST
Florida's not the only place that has nasty things living and growing! Poisonous hemlock and wild parsnips are creeping north. They are already in southern Ohio; so that gives you an idea of how far north they've come. They are commonly found growing together; and continuous wet conditions have allowed both to flourish. Hemlock produces small white flowers on tall stalks and can kill mammals if the sap comes in contact with mucous membranes through ingestion. It was introduced into the country as an ornamental in the mid 1800s. Parsnips and hemlock are members of the carrot family. Wild parsnips bear small yellow flowers on a thick celery-like stalk. Skin exposure to wild parsnips kills skin cells and causes a breakdown of ultraviolet light resistance which leads to painful blistering and burns which can linger for months. Knowing how to identify these plants is paramount for protection. With proper precautions, hemlock can be cut down or mowed down because it must be ingested to be harmful. Since wild parsnips react to skin contact, experts recommend contacting local horticultural experts or park officials to handle its disposal. Ashtabula residents in Ohio must be wary of the giant hogweed, also a member of the carrot family, (looks like an enlarged parsnip), and can cause similar burns and scarring on contact with skin. Don't forget...if you see wild parsnips or giant hogweed, don't try to dispose of it yourself. Photo Credit: Pixabay (Picture is of poisonous hemlock)
22 people like this
21 responses
@kareng (13800)
• United States
12 Jul
I wonder if we have this in Louisiana and Mississippi? I'll have to check with my horticulture friends here in MS.
3 people like this
@LindaOHio (6812)
• United States
12 Jul
You probably do.
4 people like this
@kareng (13800)
• United States
13 Jul
@LindaOHio Seems like I have seen a photo of the blooms on one of the horticulture groups I'm in.
1 person likes this
@LindaOHio (6812)
• United States
13 Jul
@kareng They're very similar to Queen Anne's Lace.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (83515)
• Anniston, Alabama
12 Jul
Queen Anne`s Lace, wild carrots, looks just like the hemlock, the difference is hemlock had purple spot on the stem.
3 people like this
@vandana7 (71409)
• India
12 Jul
That is a nice hint andria. :)
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (83515)
• Anniston, Alabama
12 Jul
@vandana7 I did learn this when I was looking for survival plants.
2 people like this
@LindaOHio (6812)
• United States
12 Jul
@andriaperry Thanks for the tip. Yes, it does look exactly like Queen Anne's Lace.
@wolfgirl569 (18109)
• Marion, Ohio
12 Jul
I knew it had made it to Ohio.
3 people like this
@vandana7 (71409)
• India
12 Jul
How do you kill poisonous plants?
2 people like this
@wolfgirl569 (18109)
• Marion, Ohio
12 Jul
@vandana7 Spray works with some.
1 person likes this
@franxav (6247)
12 Jul
Thank you for sharing about this beautiful killer. Its flowers are attractive.
3 people like this
@vandana7 (71409)
• India
12 Jul
Exactly what I thought...
1 person likes this
@amandajay (22771)
• New Zealand
12 Jul
Oh even though it can kill someone, it’s beautiful
3 people like this
@LeaPea2417 (25670)
• Toccoa, Georgia
12 Jul
I knew hemlock was poisonous to consume but I didn't know it could cause blisters on the skin, interesting.
2 people like this
@LindaOHio (6812)
• United States
12 Jul
The wild parsnips cause blisters...not the hemlock. The hemlock must be ingested.
1 person likes this
@LeaPea2417 (25670)
• Toccoa, Georgia
12 Jul
@LindaOHio Oh ok, I read it wrong
1 person likes this
@DocAndersen (5735)
12 Jul
Interesting, black deer ticks, normally found in New Hampshire (carriers of lime disease) are moving south. Poisonous plants moving north. Stop the roller coaster, I want to get off!
2 people like this
@LindaOHio (6812)
• United States
12 Jul
There's crap spreading all over the place!!! Florida is one of the worst! :-)
1 person likes this
12 Jul
@LindaOHio Florida is a unique place. I agree.
1 person likes this
@JohnRoberts (85122)
• Los Angeles, California
12 Jul
Just something else to worry about!
2 people like this
@LindaOHio (6812)
• United States
12 Jul
Exactly. There is crap spreading all over the place.
1 person likes this
@rakski (33950)
• Philippines
12 Jul
oh my, this is not good. Just exposure and ingestion can kill?
2 people like this
@velvet53 (19578)
• Palisade, Colorado
12 Jul
I wish theycould find a way to kill it off before it keeps spreading more. There are so many people that could come in contact with it and not know how dangerous it is.
2 people like this
@CarolDM (32754)
• United States
12 Jul
This plant is all over TN as well in pastures and fields especially.
2 people like this
@Bensen32 (4848)
• United States
12 Jul
Not sure this has reached Wisconsin but we do have something that looks kind of like that. I will have to check into it and see.
1 person likes this
@LindaOHio (6812)
• United States
12 Jul
It could be Queen Anne's Lace. @andriaperry said that the hemlock has a purple spot on the stem.
1 person likes this
@Bensen32 (4848)
• United States
12 Jul
@LindaOHio I think your right I was just looking online and I am finding only the mention of Queen Anne's Lace up here.
1 person likes this
@Tampa_girl7 (31201)
• United States
12 Jul
It's a pretty plant. Sad that it's poisonous.
1 person likes this
@LindaOHio (6812)
• United States
12 Jul
It looks just like Queen Anne's Lace.
@HazySue (30158)
• United States
12 Jul
That's not good. I thought parsnips were good to eat.
1 person likes this
@LindaOHio (6812)
• United States
12 Jul
These are wild parsnips. Very different.
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Jul
we've had hemlock near the pond as long as i can remember here. a lot of people mistake it for queen anne's lace.
1 person likes this
@LindaOHio (6812)
• United States
12 Jul
Yes, it looks very similar. Andria says that hemlock has a purple spot on the stem.
1 person likes this
@DianneN (122384)
• United States
12 Jul
I haven’t seen them in Connecticut, but will keep my eyes opened for them.
1 person likes this
@sophie09 (8485)
• Indonesia
12 Jul
very interesting! thanks for sharing the article
1 person likes this
• Preston, England
12 Jul
they look so nice too
1 person likes this
• Rupert, Idaho
12 Jul
Oh wow! That sounds scary, but good to know!
1 person likes this
@vandana7 (71409)
• India
12 Jul
That is interesting. I think I have seen the plant you showed or may be it was fennel. And I thought it was pretty. I may have been very lucky that I did not ingest it. As to other plants you mention I am just learning.
1 person likes this