Discovering Different Words Which Mean The Same Thing

By DB
@dgobucks226 (22909)
May 28, 2020 8:57pm CST
Have you ever noticed people from another region whether in the U.S. or some other country using different words to describe the same thing? I came across this when I went to college in the Midwest. Being from the Northeastern United States and the state of New Jersey, I would use the word "Soda" when describing a soft drink. In the Midwest they use the term "Pop" instead. The Ohio students sure got a laugh when they heard me say it! Which got me to thinking about other terms I discovered. See what side of the fence your on... -The words Sofa or Couch? I've heard both terms but more often than not describe that object as a "Couch." -The words Sprinkles or jimmies? I've never heard of jimmies. Apparently it is used in some states or areas. -The words Roundabout or traffic circle? I use traffic circle or just circle but am familiar with the term "Roundabout." Source- The Active Times Photo- eatthis.com
22 people like this
22 responses
@jayanth_77 (5934)
• India
29 May
Well in India for Coke or pepsi type of carbonated drink we use the term COLD DRINK. For Refridgerator we just use Fridge
2 people like this
@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Interesting. Now cold drink can cover a lot of beverages, lol. Thanks for sharing those terms I like Fridge. Much easier to spell than refrigerator.
2 people like this
• Philippines
2 Jun
@dgobucks226 in the philippines, it's common to say ref. we also say aircon (for airconditioner or a/c)
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
4 Jun
@hereandthere Thanks for those additions.
1 person likes this
@moffittjc (83577)
• Gainesville, Florida
2 Jun
If you're from the South, people say "Coke" to refer to any type of soda. I always laugh at people that say pop. I say to them, "Pop is something you do to a balloon. Soda is something you drink. Learn the difference!" haha I've also heard some people say "weedeater" and some people say "weedwhacker."
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
5 Jun
Yes, pop has so many other meanings. Did not think of popping a balloon. Good one! Pop is also used to describe a grandfather. I've never heard the term weedeater before?
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@moffittjc (83577)
• Gainesville, Florida
7 Jun
@dgobucks226 Do you call it weed whacker? Weedeater is used predominately in the south.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
9 Jun
@moffittjc Yes, Jeff! Weed whacker is the term we use. Kind of like a Mafia hit, huh..
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@snowy22315 (93352)
• United States
29 May
We always used pop at home, but I use soda nowadays..We called the couch a davenport when I was a kid.
2 people like this
@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Never heard davenport before. Thanks for sharing! Yes, soda is my term too. Another one is faucet and Spigot. Spigot is a popular term for an outside tap in the Southern U.S. Which do you use?
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@snowy22315 (93352)
• United States
2 Jun
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
4 Jun
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@RasmaSandra (34105)
• Daytona Beach, Florida
29 May
There are many different words for many different things depending on what part of the country you're in. When I lived in Latvia saying soda or pop was like speaking in English and in Latvian the word for the drinks translated to fizzy lemonade,
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Yes, different regions use different terms to describe similar items. Thanks for sharing yours. Fizzy is another word included as a way to describe a soft drink. Just like pop, soda or energy drinks. Another one is faucet and Spigot. Spigot is a popular term for an outside tap in the Southern U.S. Which do they use in Florida?
1 person likes this
@RasmaSandra (34105)
• Daytona Beach, Florida
2 Jun
@dgobucks226 mostly faucet or water tap
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@FourWalls (26225)
• Louisville, Kentucky
29 May
In the south everything fizzy is a coke. Pop was my grandfather, not a drink!
2 people like this
@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
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@thelme55 (45830)
• Germany
29 May
We both use sofa or couch but I have not heard of jimmies. I am familiar with the others.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
I see. It seems "Jimmies" are used in the New England area and the Mid-Atlantic. They go great on ice cream or cup cakes!
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@thelme55 (45830)
• Germany
1 Jun
@dgobucks226 I am using those "Jimmies" on my cakes and cupcakes but have not tried them yet on my ice cream. Thanks for the idea.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
1 Jun
@thelme55 Sure thing! They make it very tasty
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@JESSY3236 (12629)
• United States
2 Jun
I say soda too. I also say couch. I say traffic circle.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
5 Jun
Are you from New Jersey or the Northeast??? We have the same dialect
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@JESSY3236 (12629)
• United States
8 Jun
@dgobucks226 no. My fiance lives in New Jersey. But I live in North Carolina.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
11 Jun
@JESSY3236 My Mom's side of the family is from NC. That's quite a drive to visit each other.
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@simone10 (48163)
• United States
29 May
I'm from the south and all carbonated drinks we call coke.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Yes, I have heard that. Thanks for your explanation Another one is faucet and Spigot. Spigot is a popular term for an outside tap in the Southern U.S. Which one do you use?
1 person likes this
@simone10 (48163)
• United States
6 Jun
@dgobucks226 We always say faucet.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
6 Jun
@simone10 Yes faucet for me too.
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• India
11 Jun
Oh yes absolutely! There are many such words I've come across but when I read your post, there's this one funny/embarassing experience that comes to my mind. I'm from India where it's more common to refer to glue as 'gum' and to refer to chewing gum, we generally say the brand name or as chewing gum specifically. So this had happened when I was new to the US and had just joined work. I used to have the habit of chewing on gum most of the times and one fine day while I was at work and chewing on my gum, one of my colleagues came over to me and asked if I have a gum. Like I said, since I was new to the US of A and also it was a work place, I assumed that he was asking for glue! So I searched around a bit and replied no since I didn't have a glue. Just then one of my other colleagues said he has one and handed over a chewing gum and I went like Yes! Still pretty confused what reaction to pick by the way, I was that embarrassed and confused I was so worried that he might have misunderstood that I had intentionally avoided to share my gum and what not! He took the gum from the other colleague and disappeared to his work station but I couldn't work peacefully after that. So after pulling myself together I went upto him and explained him everything, apologized and told him that he is always welcome to ask me for a 'gum' whenever he needs one but just makes sure that he specifies which gum so he can safely put it in his mouth! He had a hearty laugh listening to everything
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
11 Jun
Oh what an experience that was for you. That was a great example! Good thing you did not hand him some glue That would of got you a strange look.
1 person likes this
• India
12 Jun
@dgobucks226 It sure would have! I should thank my stars that I didn't have a glue at my desk.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
13 Jun
@Miracle_Maya Yes, definitely
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@LindaOHio (40349)
• United States
29 May
I'm from the NW and always say pop, couch, sprinkles but I sometimes do say roundabout.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Roundabout is kind of a neater way to describe circle! It seems "Jimmies" are used in the New England area and the Mid-Atlantic. Another one is faucet and Spigot. Spigot is a popular term for an outside tap in the Southern U.S. Which term are you more familiar with?
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@LindaOHio (40349)
• United States
31 May
@dgobucks226 I have used spigot; but 99% of the time it's faucet.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
1 Jun
@LindaOHio Yes, that's the term I am most familiar.
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@LadyDuck (292056)
• Switzerland
29 May
While I would use sofa or couch the same, for a circular intersection I would prefer Roundabout, I thought that "Pop" means grandfather. Also in Italy we use different words for the same things according to the region where we live. As an example, socks are called "calzini" in my region "calzette" in some other regions.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Yes, Pop seems to be a term used for a few things. When I hear pop, it also makes me think of a popsicle, a popular kind of dessert kids enjoy. I've also used couch and sofa. Interesting how different regions use different terminology, thanks for sharing. BTW- don't try to tell those American midwestern states their is only one term for Pop
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@LadyDuck (292056)
• Switzerland
1 Jun
@dgobucks226 I never use slang when I speak foreign languages, I only dare to use dialect words in my own language and ONLY for my own region.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
1 Jun
@LadyDuck I understand
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@Hannihar (96832)
• Israel
31 May
@dgobucks226 You are very right about how people say different things for the same word. I grew up in the Midwest and we used to call soda pop and in the east they call it soda. I have also never heard of jimmies. What is Roundabout?
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Yes, let me explain those terms a bit more for you Hanni. A roundabout (also called a traffic circle, road circle, rotary, rotunda or island) is a type of circular intersection or junction in which road traffic is permitted to flow in one direction around that island. It seems "Jimmies" are used in the New England area and the Mid-Atlantic.
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@Hannihar (96832)
• Israel
31 May
@dgobucks226 Thanks DB.
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@moonandstars (38319)
• Zagreb, Croatia (Hrvatska)
31 May
Traffic circle sounds easy but I think I wouldn't remember.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Actually, roundabout sounds neater. Kind of a fancier way of saying traffic circle.
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• Zagreb, Croatia (Hrvatska)
2 Jun
@dgobucks226 yes, i agree with you and you hear it countless times in many songs or movies
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@CarolDM (82618)
• Nashville, Tennessee
29 May
I have heard all of these before. I have learned a lot here from all over the world.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Another one is faucet and Spigot. Spigot is a popular term for an outside tap in the Southern U.S. Which term are you more familiar with?
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@CarolDM (82618)
• Nashville, Tennessee
31 May
@dgobucks226 Spigot (spicket!)
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@rebelann (72084)
• El Paso, Texas
29 May
I've never heard of the last two, they must be new but I've heard the first 2 used interchangeably and as for soda or pop, round here it's cola but I've heard the first 2 as well when I'm on base.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Your right, cola is a three way to say that beverage It seems "Jimmies" are used in the New England area and the Mid-Atlantic. And I just love "sprinkles on my ice cream
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@rebelann (72084)
• El Paso, Texas
31 May
Ohhhh, I didn't connect ice cream cones to sprinkles, I rarely eat sweets of any kind unless it's fruit @dgobucks226
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@LowRiderX (20260)
• Serbia
29 May
This confuses me quite a bit, maybe I haven’t woken up yet
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
In the U.S. there definitely is a lot of double meanings and synonyms Thanks for reading.
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@LowRiderX (20260)
• Serbia
31 May
@dgobucks226 I could do that, but only that ... without understanding
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• Agra, India
29 May
Different languages have different meanings for the same terms
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Absolutely! A world of double meanings and synonyms.
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• Agra, India
1 Jun
@dgobucks226 yes...and I'm English itself so many words hold two different meanings
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@paigea (29069)
• Canada
29 May
I have noticed the different words.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Yes, common words which mean the same thing. Or synonyms as they can be called... Pop also can be used for grandfather. Crazy stuff!
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@paigea (29069)
• Canada
31 May
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@hereandthere (43624)
• Philippines
2 Jun
we say sofa or sopa in filipino. i know sprinkles (candy sprinkles), and have never seen or heard it called jimmies we call the roundabout rotonda here
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
5 Jun
It seems "Jimmies" are used in the New England area and the Mid-Atlantic states in the U.S. Another one is faucet and Spigot. Spigot is a popular term for an outside tap in the Southern U.S.
1 person likes this
@Corbin5 (193190)
• United States
29 May
Being from the Midwest, Chicago suburbs, pop it is and always will be.
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@dgobucks226 (22909)
31 May
Yes, pop seems to be the way of the Midwest regions. Although technically it's "soda" pop. Another one is faucet and Spigot. Spigot is a popular term for an outside tap in the Southern U.S.
1 person likes this