What's something no longer available that you wish the younger generations could experience?

United States
February 22, 2021 12:18pm CST
What's something from your childhood or early adulthood that isn't available any longer, but you wish the younger generations could experience? It could be a fashion / music / movie trend, it could be a class that is no longer available in schools, it could be a food item... Whatever it is, tell me about it. This is a tough one for me, but I think I'll give the easiest / most generic / most apparent answer : Outside! I'm not saying that kids don't go outside now, but the ones I know spend the majority of their time indoors. I know some will say that this is a "parent issue", but well... From the age of like five to maybe fifteen years old, you would rarely find me inside. I was always going outside and exploring. I was raised on the "yelling system". From around the age of 8+, as long as I could hear my mom yelling for me, I could go as far as I wanted to go. That's just not the way of thing any longer. So what's your example?
16 people like this
18 responses
@Namelesss (3337)
• United States
22 Feb
Darn you took my example, lol. Hard work and lessons on being tough and self-reliant. Remember when if you wanted to eat you had to do a days work? If you wanted to learn something you had to get your hands dirty and again do the work. For little kids remember when your parents told the stories rather than some celebrity or celebrity wannabe.
9 people like this
• United States
22 Feb
Oh, very true! I grew up with the earning system. If I wanted it I had to earn it in one way or another. If my parents or grandparents didn't think I did a good enough job I either didn't get what I wanted or I got the item taken away. If we sat in front of the tv for too long then they found something else for us to do. We were encouraged to go outside or be roped into something like cleaning or helping repair things.
3 people like this
@DaddyEvil (34673)
• United States
22 Feb
When Pretty was little she played baseball. Parents weren't allowed to cheer for their kid unless they cheered for all the kids. I decided fine, I'd cheer for all of them. All the other parents sat there silently while I yelled, "You're fine, you'll catch it next time!" "Beautiful! You hit it out of the park!" "Hit that ball as hard as you can! Make them work to get you out!" I didn't care which team was at bat, or which team was in the field... I rooted for all of them. After the game, both teams came over and thanked me for rooting them on. Some of the little girls wanted to come home with Pretty and I because I was the 'cool' dad. I was so proud of them! And rotary dial telephones... It's hard to think of things we had but they don't. Am I getting old?
5 people like this
• United States
22 Feb
I LOVED the rotary dial phone my grandparents had. Actually, I ended up breaking it somehow and got yelled at for it. I feel like that's a good rule to have though, about cheering everyone on or none at all. You see the theme on lots of shows of parents getting over zealous with their kids sports teams and thinking their kid is the best at the sport / railing against the other kids even on the same team.
1 person likes this
@DaddyEvil (34673)
• United States
22 Feb
@ScribbledAdNauseum I watched a YouTube video where two 13 year old boys were trying to figure out how to use one. It was hilarious! I can see how it could happen but it was sad to see how much the girl wanted someone, anyone, to cheer for them.
1 person likes this
• United States
22 Feb
@DaddyEvil Funny you should mention youtube. I think it was there that I found a video of an Irish father trying to teach his son how to vacuum. I feel like it was more of a prank because what kid doesn't know how to use a plug?
1 person likes this
@myklj999 (54494)
• United States
22 Feb
Having to EARN trophies. Actual competition, not everybody gets something for playing.
5 people like this
• United States
22 Feb
I think I gave the "participation trophy" I earned in like '93 or '94 for field day to goodwill.
1 person likes this
@Namelesss (3337)
• United States
22 Feb
@ScribbledAdNauseum Even kids are embarrassed to get those worthless things.
1 person likes this
• United States
22 Feb
@Namelesss I remember just letting it sit in my room and collect dust. I left it with my mom when I moved out of the house.
1 person likes this
@jstory07 (101362)
• Roseburg, Oregon
22 Feb
I never let my kids stay in and play video games all day. We went to the park every day and went on walks. All of my kids enjoyed the outdoors. I taught my kids how to figure out a checking account and to save back money in a savings account. To figure out a budget.
4 people like this
• United States
22 Feb
I was taught those same things. We had a piggy bank and we were taught how to roll our change. If we were inside for too long we were roped into doing chores.
1 person likes this
@marguicha (167937)
• Chile
22 Feb
I was going to say the same thing you said. When I was a kid, neighborhood meant something entirely different from what it means now. All the children in the neighborhood played outdoors, many times in the streets as there weren´t many cars and they were careful.
2 people like this
• United States
22 Feb
Yes, it was the same with us. Drivers also honked and slowed down to give us time to move out of the way. Now we can't trust that drivers will do this.
1 person likes this
@marguicha (167937)
• Chile
22 Feb
@ScribbledAdNauseum Before, people all took care of children.
1 person likes this
• United States
23 Feb
@marguicha This is true. I've heard stories of this before and my own grandmother took care of her younger siblings and the house while her parents worked. Families were much closer then.
1 person likes this
@CarolDM (118934)
• Nashville, Tennessee
22 Feb
Turn the phones and video games off and get outside. Play in the dirt!
2 people like this
• United States
22 Feb
I saw a meme a few years ago where a kid took a chair outside, popped off the screen to his window and fed his game controller through the window to "play outside"
1 person likes this
@CarolDM (118934)
• Nashville, Tennessee
22 Feb
@ScribbledAdNauseum Does not surprise me one bit.
2 people like this
• United States
22 Feb
@CarolDM That would have gotten me a spanking and grounded.
1 person likes this
@Tina30219 (67852)
• Onaway, Michigan
22 Feb
Funny you bring up parent issues my girlfriend her parents would blow a whistle when they needed to be home for dinner if they was not home they would get in trouble. And bedtime they had to be in bed 7pm and when it was not dark then it sucked
2 people like this
• United States
22 Feb
My mom just screamed. "AAAAAAAAAAAAAMMMMMBBBBEEEERRRRR" I got a whooping if I wasn't home within five minutes. She also wanted me to scream back that i was on my way home.
1 person likes this
@Tina30219 (67852)
• Onaway, Michigan
22 Feb
@ScribbledAdNauseum Wow sounds like my friends parents.
1 person likes this
• United States
22 Feb
@Tina30219 I can only remember once or twice when I didn't come home when she yelled.
@marlina (119187)
• Canada
22 Feb
I wish kids could still play freely outside and not always be in or in a team
2 people like this
• United States
22 Feb
True! There's so much fun they could be having outdoors, but most are indoors playing games about being outdoors. It makes little sense to me.
• Pamplona, Spain
22 Feb
The magic that there was in the simplest of things. Like once there was a wild hare in the bottom shed and I made friends with it while it was there. Beautiful soulful eyes and lovely and warm and soft to stroke.
1 person likes this
• United States
22 Feb
Oh that sounds beautiful! My grandmother once dug a hole in her garden and nearly killed a family of bunnies by accident. My aunt took them from her and brought them back to health.
1 person likes this
• Pamplona, Spain
23 Feb
@ScribbledAdNauseum Poor bunnies pretty sure that she never meant to do that just coincidence and its really good she was able to nurse them back to health.
1 person likes this
• United States
23 Feb
@lovinangelsinstead21 I was outside with her when it happened. We were both startled and she had me run into the house and call my aunt right away. My aunt came to get the bunnies and they lived many years with her.
1 person likes this
• Rupert, Idaho
22 Feb
Hmm, that is a very good question. I think I would say the same though, to be honest.
1 person likes this
• United States
22 Feb
Right? So many kids aren't spending a lot of time outside anymore. They are all about their tablets / phones etc.
1 person likes this
• Rupert, Idaho
22 Feb
@ScribbledAdNauseum My son would rather be on his phone/tablet...so I understand. I also don't like to be outside these days so it is probably my fault. LOL...but he plays with toys inside if he doesn't get a device.
1 person likes this
• United States
22 Feb
@MommyOfEli2013 I don't really like being outside that much either so I can understand that. I always treid to get my niece and nephew outdoors. I could usually manage an hour or so here and there with them, but then they'd want to be inside and on their tablets.
1 person likes this
@LindaOHio (59059)
• United States
23 Feb
So many things. I had my bike and my roller skates and would be out from dawn to when the street lights came on. That's when I had to go home or my mom would start yelling for me. I wish kids could have the music that we had from the 60s and 70s. The fact that it's still popular today speaks for how it's so much better than rap with all it's swearing and suggestive lyrics.
1 person likes this
• United States
23 Feb
There are some very strange music genres out there now. I love a mix of music, including some from the 60s & 70s. My nephew played some of the music he liked for me one day and I just didn't understand how he liked it. The background music was too squeaky (is the best way I can describe it) and the lyrics made little to no sense to me.
1 person likes this
@LindaOHio (59059)
• United States
23 Feb
@ScribbledAdNauseum Whenever we're away from home we listen to the Oldies station (60s and 70s music).
1 person likes this
• United States
23 Feb
@LindaOHio You can't listen to it at home? Like on youtube or Iheartradio.com?
1 person likes this
@mythociate (17812)
• Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
24 Feb
The hang-up slam! And--looking at the picture--I'm also "sad" that they'll miss 'the rotary dial.'
1 person likes this
• United States
24 Feb
Throwing the phone across the room just doesn't feel the same, does it? II remember slamming the phone down too and it was just cathartic.
@mythociate (17812)
• Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
24 Feb
@ScribbledAdNauseum I do use a flip-phone, though; so there is that little 'slam'
1 person likes this
@JimBo452020 (42933)
• Montrose, Scotland
22 Feb
I cannot think of anything off of the top of my head. Oh wait Proper Amyl Nitrate. Yes, young adults, 12 years old plus would really benefit from this stuff.
1 person likes this
• United States
22 Feb
Is that smelling salts?
1 person likes this
@JimBo452020 (42933)
• Montrose, Scotland
22 Feb
@ScribbledAdNauseum Lol Well sort of
1 person likes this
@kaylachan (14035)
• Daytona Beach, Florida
22 Feb
I never got to experience that. My parents were paranoid and kept me pretty sheltered. Living in the same house for 19 years, thought me a few diy tricks for repairs and such (now that I own my own home, it's a cost-saving lifesaver). But, I would have to say, respect. Growing up you had respect for your parents and authority figures. Kids did what they were told, or they weren't allowed to go out and play with their friends. Along with the going out you mentioned, let's not forget trust. Parents had to trust their kids to do the right thing. Trust their kids to come inside when called..... and know they're going to be safe. Because I am disabled, my school bus would pick me up and drop me off in front of my house. But, my sister (when she started taking the bus) could walk to the bus stop wherever it was without fear.
1 person likes this
• United States
22 Feb
My brother still got to do more things than my sister and I ever were allowed, but we had more leniency than what the kids these days do. I understand that though because the world is a scary place now. I wasn't sheltered per se, but there were some things I wasn't allowed to do because of my epilepsy. My mom was disabled and there were some responsibility things I had to learn based on that. Like when my mom screamed for me, I had to scream back that I was on my way so she wouldn't worry / feel the need to get her scooter out and come looking for me.
1 person likes this
@kaylachan (14035)
• Daytona Beach, Florida
22 Feb
@ScribbledAdNauseum I understand. I mean some disabilities do come with limitations and expectations. Being disabled all my life, I knew that from a young age. I was thought to keep my expectations realistic based on what I could and could not do. I was always adjusting and adapting to every little thing I did. Sure, as a teenager, I gained some freedoms. But, my household wasn't exactly a good one. Sure my parents loved me and for that, my siblings were jealous. I know an odd concept, isn't it? But, despite this... I was thought respect for my elders. My blindness was no excuse not to try to look at someone when they spoke to me. Or to be polite when dealing with people. Some kids today just don't. I hear about doctors complaining about obesidity going up, but kids are encouraged to stay inside. We don't have organizations anymore like we used to to mentor these kids. Or, if we do they aren't being used to their fullest. Often kids don't have a safe place to go. And, in this last year, that's become more true. Kids today lack conversation skills because they are getting technology earlier and earlier. I've adapted to it, but I also remember the most exciting technology was cordless phones and digital answering machines.
1 person likes this
• United States
23 Feb
Playing outside certainly isn't what it was back in my day either. We used to go out, ride our bikes and not come home until dinner time. Life was a slower pace and of course safer. I couldn't picture kids today disappearing until dinner time without someone getting worried.
1 person likes this
• United States
23 Feb
Very true! Even with a lot of kids having cell phones, you just can't be too careful now.
@snowy22315 (108652)
• United States
23 Feb
Good question, so many "fun' things " have been taken away. I would say something like going to a cider Mill and being able to watch up close and personal how a cider press works. Also, the freedom of not having to worry about bike helmets.
@JESSY3236 (13955)
• United States
23 Feb
I would say records, but they are back. Also cursive writing.
@prinzcy (19124)
• Malaysia
23 Feb
I wish they would leave the gadgets and go see the outside world sometimes.