Do You Ever Eat Wild Food or Food From The Forest?

Oyster Mushroom - This is a picture of an Oyster Mushroom, which is edible and apparently has a faint taste of seafood.
@Nykkee (2523)
Canada
July 19, 2007 4:24pm CST
Does anyone here collect wild food from the forest to eat? I have recently ben looking into multiple ways to save money and have a good full life with my husband's income and me at home. One of the things that I have found that I am very interested is wild foods, things that you can eat that grow naturally in the woods. You might be suprised at how many things you actually can eat from the forest. One thing that I am really looking forward to trying is the Oyster Mushroom. I have seen them growing many place before but it never even occured to me that they might be edible. Here is a great link that I have found with information about wild foods: http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/
3 people like this
8 responses
@Ken_Smith (240)
19 Jul 07
my family are slovak and they live of land. plants and mushroom. boar and squirrel. i live in england now and miss gypo tinkers with all my heart. i go back next year for holiday and eat some moss with spices. it is lovely. i no have girl partner.
3 people like this
@Nykkee (2523)
• Canada
1 May 08
Eww I don't think I would ever be interested in eating a squirrel.
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
20 Jul 07
I do not dare pick mushrooms, even though they might be safe. I have picked blackberries and wild blueberries when I lived in British Columbia. There are not that many forests here except in the Parks and I think you can get hazelnuts, but I guess they are protected.
2 people like this
@Nykkee (2523)
• Canada
1 May 08
That's too bad hazelnuts are delicious.
@Nardz13 (5059)
• New Zealand
20 Jul 07
Hi there. The only wild food, berry or fruit Ive collected from the bush/forest was wild strawberries and that was when I was younger... But I have this friend, she goes out hunting and drops me off wild pig, so theres something wild from the forest...
2 people like this
@Nykkee (2523)
• Canada
1 May 08
We have wild blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, cranberries, and tea berries that grow around here. We also have wild strawberries but they are really tiny.
@wiccania (3360)
• United States
20 Jul 07
I don't, but only because I don't know what's safe and what isn't. I would definitely try it after learning what's ok to eat and what isn't.
2 people like this
@Nykkee (2523)
• Canada
1 May 08
I have a website that I use as a reference to see what is safe or not.
@matte5 (1913)
• Sweden
19 Jul 07
Hello. I live in sweden and take a lot of foods from the nature not only the forest, I go fishing and hunting and pick mushrooms and a lot of outher stuff I dont knowe the english word for so I neaver buy meat or fish in the store and sawing a lot of money this way. Hawe a nice day.
@Nykkee (2523)
• Canada
1 May 08
I bet you do save alot of money that way. Here in Canada, unfortunatly, you need to buy a license to be allowed to fish and even then there is a limit on how many you are allowed ot catch.
@GreenMoo (11842)
30 Apr 08
The mushrooms haven't been great here this year, but I collect other wild foods to supplement our table which have been good. Probably the most versatile of the leaves I collect is the humble nettle. I've just come back from collecting a bag full for soup actually. Sorrell is lovely too, and you can find all sort of different wild herbs to add to your salad. And of course you mustn't forget all the wild fruits and berries when they are in season. Around here I can collect bags and bags of apples and blackberries, which make lovely deserts and jams right through late summer and autumn. Then there's elderflowers for elderflower cordial or champagne, and all sort of other things. I heartily recommend two books, 'Food for Free' and 'Wild Food'. Both excellent.
@Nykkee (2523)
• Canada
1 May 08
I will have to see if they have those books around here. I think I will be collecting up young dandelion greens tomorrow to stew up.
@GreenMoo (11842)
1 May 08
You stew up dandelion greens? And eat them like spinach then, or something else? I've not tried a recipe where I've cooked them, just eaten them raw in salad. I find them a little bitter, but one or two is OK. I actually grew dandelions in my greenhouse once under cover so that they wouldn't turn green. It's the green which gives them the bitterness so they were a lot tastier, but not tasty enough to make that something I'd bother with regularly!
@deebomb (15322)
• United States
21 Apr 08
Some years ago my son and myself and grandchildren would go hunting for the oyster mushroom and the morels. We had a lot of fun and picked a lot of those. we never tried for any other kind because some are too hard to identify. we loved both those kinds of mushrooms. I would love to go to the woods to scavenger for food but am unable to these days. When I was younger we ofter picked a lot of wild berries.
1 person likes this
@Nykkee (2523)
• Canada
1 May 08
Oyster muchrooms are what I was thinking about trying because I read that they taste like oysters, plus they are relatively common around here.
@GreenMoo (11842)
1 May 08
They no way taste like oysters! Oysters are foul, but oyster mushrooms are delicious! I figure they get their name from the way they look. Anyway, go for it and see if you can find some because they really are worth it. Good luck!
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
2 Aug 07
Hi, have you checked out my discussion? The one with multiple replies, not the one with only one reply. I list what I'm currently gathering at Helium.com, too. There is not as much food from the forests as the fields, streams, ponds, meadows, etc. The weeds you pull in your garden and your lawn may be more helpful. Personally, mushrooms, I would only gather puff balls because once it gets to be the size of a basketball, it can't be anything else! But too many people have gathered them, I only saw one once and I had to leave it alone to multiply, but someone else took it and I've never seen one since. Try to find a mushroom society in your area. They have some great classes and field trips. I'm 3 hours away from the nearest one-unfortunately. Your local colleges might have a class that's more like a club. My cousins belonged to one and they had all kinds of mushrooms that they preserved. The main thing to remember: If there are less than 7, leave them a lone. More than 7, but not many, gather 1 in 7. A ton of something, 1 out of 3. Educate all new gatherers to not gather too much. Irresponsible people, I don't even teach how to gather. If they have no respect and over-indulge in things, they won't respect the woods either. Be careful who you teach. Wild lambs quarters are my favorite. They grow in gardens and in soil where the surface has been removed (over your septic tank after it's been emptied, but don't use those, just for ID purposes and explanations only).. A huge bowl with yogurt dressing. So fresh and so much energy in it, it makes you high! Best picked, for that purpose, in the spring. Take care and happy foraging!
@Nykkee (2523)
• Canada
1 May 08
I thought that where mushrooms are a fungus and grow from under the ground, as long as you leave part of it behind it will grow back.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
1 May 08
Some mushrooms multiply the way you are saying, but many multiply by sending out spores. Puff balls multiply by sending out spores into the air once they have become passed the edible stage. They turn yellow inside. Always research your wild edibles before you pick them. Thay way you know how they multiply and can pick responsibly.