Does buying healthy food difficult on your budget ?

@suspenseful (40316)
Canada
February 24, 2008 7:22pm CST
I do not mean that you will buy less healthy food, but that if you do not control the money, that is you are not the main bread winner, that perhaps your spouse mistakenly believes that the less cost of white bread against the greater price of whole grain bread make the monetary value more important that the healthy value. Or suppose you are wanting to make your own soup instead buying something that has additives, but your spouse decides that the latter is cheaper? Now are you having a struggle with your mate who prefers a bigger pocket book to a healthier lifestyle? Give me your views.
10 people like this
34 responses
@winterose (39918)
• Canada
25 Feb 08
I get most of my food from food banks, I have very little control over what I eat
2 people like this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
7 Mar 08
That is too bad. I guess you do not get that healthy food. We find at Superstore and Safeway, they seldom put veggies and salad stuff in the bags, most of it canned goods, macaroni and cheese, and stuff like that.
@stephcjh (32327)
• United States
25 Feb 08
Healthy food is expensive. We can barely afford to buy regular food as it is. We have to make sure that all of the food that we purchase, will provide a meal for all three of us. I would much rather eat healthy than have money in the bank and bad health.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
26 Feb 08
I would rather buy healthier food, and that reminds me, perhaps if our parents had been more concerned with our health instead of saving money, we all would have been better off. I mean I feel i have to make up for lost time, and there are things that eating healthy now will not reverse.
@stephcjh (32327)
• United States
28 Feb 08
I wish I would have been taught to eat healthier too because now I am stuck on alot of junk food because it tastes so good and I rarely have any desire to eat healthy food because the taste isn't as good for my taste buds.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
1 Mar 08
I thought I was eating healthy foodk, but it was not that good.
@zeloguy (4913)
• United States
4 Mar 08
I thought that it really would but it doesn't. My soy milk is LESS expensive than regular milk now and although fruits (which ARE kinda high) and vegetables seem high, the price per portion is actually lower than if you are eating a good cut of meat. I have found Kashi (certified organic) for $2.50/box and nuts and seeds I buy in bulk and save a huge amount of money. I just went 'healthy' shopping the other day thought I was going to be well over $200 and ended up only being $90! I really am starting to become a believer that eating more healthy is actually LESS expensive not more.... Thanks Zelo
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
11 Jun 08
The trouble is that my husband has most of the money so if I want to get some nuts or grains or even the healthy cereals, I have to go to the Bulk Store and buy it myself and when you consider that I have only $600 a month to work on and he has almost $3000 a month and that is not counting his stocks, it is a difficult situation. He will not let me plant a veggie garden, and our berry garden is too small. I use yogurt rather than regular milk because it does not give me phlegm. ?But I would rather buy the vegetables fresh or grow them than having to buy frozen. And I wish I was in charge of the grocery shopping not my husband.
1 person likes this
@Sillychick (3279)
• United States
25 Feb 08
What good is money if you haven't got your health? Your mistake here, is thinking of it as His money. Maybe he earns more, but both of you are important to the household, and your contributions are just as valuable as his are. I am a sahm, my husband works for the money. I take care of our son and do most of the cleaning, shopping and cooking. The money my husband earns is OURS. We both decide how it is spent. If I need something, I buy it without asking for permission, or feeling guilty about spending the money he earned. The reason is that if I went out and got a job, our son would have to go to daycare, which would cost us plenty, plus my husband would have to take on more responsibility around the house. He knows that, which is why he values my contributions as much as his. So go ahead and buy what you need, and make your spouse understand that a marriage is a Partnership, and one spouse does not get to make decisions for the other.
1 person likes this
• United States
25 Feb 08
I respect my wife, who stays at home. But you don't seem to be respecting the husband that goes to work. "The money my husband earns is OURS" sounds good, but there might be more than one way to think about it, too. "If I need something, I buy it without asking for permission or feeling guilty about spending the money he earned." This is similar to a husband who feels no shame in coming home and making a mess of the place if he wishes. When you keep the house clean, you do work for the house. If he comes home and feels no guilt about messing it up -- he shows disrespect for your effort. If you just spend what you want when you want, you are also showing disrespect for how he provides for the family. It sounds like the money he makes is YOURS. It doesn't sound like you consider it OURS. If the money were "OURS", then purchases would have to be something both people agree on. If you are a team and a partnership, then both of you have to respect how the other person contributes. In the case of money, both people have to care about the other person's point of view. A working husband with a stay at home wife shouldn't try to play financial tyrant. But a woman who is able to stay home and take care of the house and children should also consider that financially planning for the long term picture (retirement) is the husband's "job" and she might need to consider that when she thinks about if she really "needs" something or if something less expensive could serve. In your defense, it appears that you do not spend more than your husband is comfortable with. This is a distinctly different situation than the person posting the question.
1 person likes this
• United States
25 Feb 08
I respect my husband Very much, and I appreciate that his willingness to work hard is the reason I am able to stay home and care for our son. You assume that I spend the money frivolously, but I don't. I buy, as I stated, what I Need. In other words, if I feel that whole grain bread is better for the health of my family, I buy it and my husband does not question that decision. At the same time, as you stated, financial decisions should be shared, and they are. I don't feel that buying a loaf of bread at $1.50 qualifies as a 'financial decision.' In the same way that while he is at work and wants to buy lunch, I don't consider that a decision that needs my consent. And, while his name is on the paycheck, I am the one who takes care of our budget. I am the one who makes sure the bills get paid. I let him know when cash flow is a little poor and he needs to tighten the reins, and I do the same. Therefore, planning for the future is my responsibility too. By the way, don't talk to me about whether I truly Need something or if something less expensive would do. In the past year I have bought exactly 2 things for myself, both from the clearance rack. And last week my husband threw away my 3-year-old, dirty, worn-out sneakers to Make me get the new ones that I said I didn't need. This is not because I don't want to spend His money, but because I am just a frugal person.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
7 Mar 08
It all depends on how you were raised. The way I was raised, the husband DID not do the grocery shopping. He gave his wife a generous allowance or if he was unable to manage the money as in my dad's case, he gave his wife the wife the check book or his paycheck, she used envelopes and divided the money out. In my husband's case, the men were different, they were considered good financial managers even if they were not, they did the grocery shopping and the purchases while the wife stayed home, looked after the kids, it was the Mennonite way. Oh and girls who worked handed their paychecks to their parents. We consider the money ours, but my husband still is affected by his upbringing and I sometimes get flack if I purchase something that is healthier but more expensive.
@KarenO52 (2951)
• United States
7 Mar 08
My husband doesn't care how much I spend on groceries, and he's always wanting me to buy the best of everything. I grew up learning not to waste food, since my parents went through the depression when they were growing up. Also, I try to not waste resources. Trying to balance that and eat healthy takes a lot of planning, and I'm not always successful. For one thing, I live out in the country and it's quite a drive to the store just to get a few things, so I try to go enough that I can have some fresh produce for a few days, and not get so much that I have to throw all the stuff out. I make homemade bread, sometimes whole wheat, and sometimes rye, but that has to be eaten within a day or two or it gets dried out with no preservatives in it. I stock up on things that will last for a while like dried beans, onions, and potatoes, and I have a small herb garden to get a little bit of fresh greens every day. I love to make homemade soup, and I think it's actually cheaper than the canned stuff. When I was younger, I had a nice garden in the summer that always produced more than enough tomatoes, green peppers, and green beans. That was the easiest stuff to grow. I don't have one anymore, because with the clay soil we have, and the fact that I can't keep up with the weeds, it's just too much for me.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
11 Jun 08
I have started to buy dried beans and have reconstituted them and put them in small packages to use as soup or to make chili. I am planning to make some either this week or the next. I used to make whole wheat bread, but that means buying more butter and I ran out of whole wheat flour so I have to buy some later on. I do not have a garden except for growing berries. It is rather hard, because I want one but my husband does not want a vegetable garden.
1 person likes this
@KarenO52 (2951)
• United States
12 Jun 08
My husband surprised me by putting a garden for me this year, and I'm so happy working in it. I've got tomatoes, squash, peppers and beans, lettuce and radishes. It's worth the extra work for some fresh produce. If your husband doesn't want to have a vegetable garden, you could maybe get him to try a container garden. There are many different kinds of things you could plant in big pots, and they are easy to take care of.
1 person likes this
@Lakota12 (42684)
• United States
26 Feb 08
WEll I just dont know what to tell ya on that we do the grocery shopping and we buy what we want and cook what we want the might make the money but we do the shopping and the cooking if they dont like it they eat what ever
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
11 Jun 08
The trouble is my husband and I go shopping together. And he goes for the cheapest. I do buy vegetables when they are on sale. In fact, I have started to buy sweet potatoes, but I am the only one who eats it and my husband thinks that unless he eats it, go without. But I do not want to die in poor health like his mother did. She was in her eighties and it was not a healthy eighty like my maternal grandmother was, but then she was English and the women do the grocery shopping whereas my mother-in-law was Mennonite and the men do the grocery shopping and they are not that good choosers as to healthy foods.
@Lakota12 (42684)
• United States
11 Jun 08
I thought they grew all thier own food! They do in Indiana and Tenn and other places they live
@reinydawn (11649)
• United States
26 Feb 08
Well, that would be hard for me to say because I'm an equal "bread winner". We both work, and we both understand the importance of eating healthy instead of prepared foods. If you do it right, you can make a huge pot of soup and freeze it in daily servings which will really cost you less than that can does. But, what your hubby is probably seeing is that ONE big bill for everything, not realizing that over time you're saving money - and health.
1 person likes this
@reinydawn (11649)
• United States
12 Jun 08
Thanks for best response! I hope your garden(s) will bear fruit for you. I know that will help keep the costs down too!
@mipen2006 (5528)
• Australia
25 Feb 08
I believe my wife and I have a happy mix here. Living in THailand forced me to make a lot of changes to my rather unhealthy Western diet, and the cost dropped. However I did change her to whole grain bread. We often have home made soup for breakfast. That's right Thais often have soup for breakfast, and her soup is delicious.
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
25 Feb 08
I guess when things grow all year round, instead of having a short growing season, then you can eat healthy. Here in Canada, the cheapest time to buy healthy food is in late August to the beginning of October or else we have to import fresh vegetables from Florida, California, or Chile. I mean my husband was annoyed that the whole grain bread cost $2.00, but I only need two slices a day, not four or five that I would need with white bread. We also bought some soup that was low sodium, low fat and tasted just like what my mother used to make.
1 person likes this
@mipen2006 (5528)
• Australia
26 Feb 08
Wholegrain bread here is also about $2 Canadian, and white bread is much cheaper. I guess one advantage we have over you is the wonderful range of fruits, and there's always some in season. Unfortunately, I'm not a great fruit eater.
1 person likes this
• Australia
14 Jun 08
Food bill here would not me alot higher i suppose for the quanity of unhealthy food you could get abit more deepending on the products you buy, but if you shop smart it shouldn't effect your bill too much. I think a good tip is to buy larger amounts of the same think, you always save with bulk and things can be cooked and frozen already prepared. I think everyone should know how to cook meals healthily and cost efficiently.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
14 Jun 08
It all depends on where you live. Certainly if you live where there is a longer growing season, you can get fruits and vegetables at low cost all year round rather than at certain times of the year. And you can see what diseases and conditions are more prelevent as you get farther from the equator, heart disease, diabetes, and strokes being what happens when you do not get enough fruit and vegetables in your diet. The trouble is with the price of oil, gas, and diesel going up and the substitutes requiring the taking out of production more food producing food, we will soon be in a position where the healthier people are in the sub tropical and tropical regions and the unhealthy people are in the temperate and colder regions. Buying bulk works if you have a family, but if it is just the two of you, how do you do it?
• Philippines
12 Jun 08
just last week, i commented to a a friend that it cost too much to eat healthy,... we're not much into bread, its rice for us, before i buy red or brown rice, (unpolished) but it cost too much now, our country have rice shortage they say.... now, home grown veggies and my coconut tree are my only source of healthy food...
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
13 Jun 08
We have a lot of Filipinos, East Indians, and Chinese in Winnipeg and when we went shopping, I found that most of the large bags of brown and the healthy rice had gone. Only the cheap stuff was left. I use brown rice myself, and converted rice as a next resort, and I am almost out. I do eat bread, but I prefer the whole grain. I do not have a vegetable garden, but we eat lots of salad, and most of my vegetables are frozen. I have a berry garden but the berries have not come yet. I blame the global warmers who have made sure that the rice fields are converted to corn for ethanol. If things had kept as they were, there would be enough to feed everyone.
@albert2412 (1782)
• United States
12 Jun 08
Since I am retired on a limited income, I do not have much money. I have to support myself, my wife, our two sons (one of whom is hanficapped). I have to buy food that is on sale or is the cheapest so that we can eat. there was a time that i did buy organic milk, until I found oput that the milk that I was buying was not organic after all.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
13 Jun 08
It must hurt when you want to buy healthy and therefore improve your son's life, but am unable to do so. I wish that junk food prices would go up and the price of healthy food would go less, but I guess many are more interested in making a profit than preserving health. We were in the Mall talking to one of our new in-laws who happens to be 83 of age and my husband was telling of his friends who were in the same age bracket as we, 60 to 65 who are dying or having strokes or heart attacks. all this because we were the ones who did not get that healthy food.
@angemac23 (2005)
• Canada
12 Jun 08
Yes, buying healthy food is very hard on my budget....I dont why they dont jack up the prices on junk food and lower the prices on healthy food so people have a chance to live healthy....its a scam...the government wants health food to be expensive so we will eat junk food and have to pay money for more health care....Unhealthy people bring in lots of money!
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
12 Jun 08
I often wondered why they did it. Certainly putting more salt and more transfat products is only going to make us less healthy and if there is an epidemic of one sort of another, instead of treating the victims, the hospitals will spend most of their time on those people who got heart attacks and diabetes from eating all that junk food. So they are cutting off their noses to spite their faces. It really is becoming a racket.
@adcab81 (65)
• Philippines
7 Mar 08
It is really more costly to buy healthy food. Fruits and vegetables do not grow whole year round unlike processed and junk food.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
11 Jun 08
That is what I feel. In order to buy healthy, we have to cut out other things. That makes it a difficult choice.
@manya_pearl (1905)
• Singapore
4 Mar 08
In the city where i live, i can buy healthy food with cheaper price, especially viand with vegetables. I usually buy vegetables, soup, and chopsuey and the like. I can buy also fruits with less price that i can find in the market which open 24 hours day. Fast food here such as mcdonald, pizza hut, and the like are more expensive, and its not that healthy...
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
11 Jun 08
I like in Manitoba and the only time we get cheap local vegetables and fruits is the late Summer and early fall. The rest of the time we have to import, and with so many fields going into fuel rather than food production even the bread is getting more, unless you stick with that unhealthy white bread. We hardly go to McDonald, and find that too expensive.
@carlaabt (3505)
• United States
4 Mar 08
My husband doesn't really pay much attention to the prices at grocery stores. I'm the one that keeps track of those things. We eat some healthy food, and some not so healthy food. We couldn't afford to eat only healthy food, because it's just too expensive. I do try to keep at least 80% of our diet on the healthy side, though.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
11 Jun 08
If I were in charge of the grocery shopping, I would be able to buy healthy food. I can go to our bulk store and get ten percent off since I am 65, but that is from my own money and I already spent what I budgeted for this month and so I have to wait until the end of the month when I get my pension checks. It is quite hard since the healthy food is more expensive than the regular type food.
@Modestah (11192)
• United States
4 Mar 08
buying healthy foods is difficult at times due to the inflated cost - while the carb and fat laden foods are readily available and less expensive. it is a shame. I think the best means of making sure you get a good portion of healthy foods is to do as much as you can towards growing and raising it yourself. a few chickens for eggs and meat, a few veggies to eat fresh and put up for the winter perhaps a fruit tree or two and a window sill of herbs... I just bought a sprouter thing to start growing sprouts again. I got a great deal at www.gardensalive.com they were on sale plus they gave me $25 off my purchase total for being a first time customer. $32 total came down to $7+
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
11 Jun 08
We live in the city and my husband does not want us to have a garden, so that is out. He is also thinking of moving to a senior home - he thinks 60 is old but I do not. There are smaller houses, but our house is small enough and there are apartments or communities for over 55s, but that is all I will see all day, everyone over 55. I did buy some blueberry plants and a few years ago I bought some strawberry plants,and next year I hope to get a container for container garden.
• Australia
28 Feb 08
For us, healthy living on a budget isn't all that hard. We do our best to provide our kids with a balanced diet and ensure that the breads etc we get are of high quality and full of good nutrition.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
11 Jun 08
I would suppose if the woman does the shopping, then choosing healthy food would be easier than if the man did the shopping, even if both the husband and wife shopped together. I had a hard time getting healthier food selections, and when the price of wheat went up, thanks to taking so many wheat field out and converting them to corn and to ethanol, I could no longer get the whole grain loaves at $1.29 a loaf. I had to go to the regular whole wheat loaf. I have to buy frozen vegetables, and although I did buy fresh asparagus, my husband would not eat it, nor would he eat the sweet potato and he is the kind that says, if he does not eat it, no body else in the whole universe will. I now am buying sweet potatoes as a substitute for white potatoes for myself, but he will not even try them. Wait until we go on our trip and he gets some at a fancy restaurant, will I let him have it then.
@Aingealicia (1906)
• United States
27 Feb 08
No actually it does not. I make everything I can from scratch and let me tell you if you point out the drs bills compared to the cost of the healthy food, the expense is huge. I have not been to the Doctor forever and a day, however the food I eat allows for preventive medication. If you bring up the cost between healthy food compared to the cost of the issues that come with what is fresh and homemade you will see a huge difference. Ainge
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
11 Jun 08
We buy our bread, and the only time we can buy fresh local vegetables is in the late summer and fall. Other wise they are imported, and even though I make stews, there is now just the two of us. When the boys were with us, I would make a beef stew and then put enough away to make a meat pie, or I would make shepherds pie. I do not buy prepared foods or packaged foods, except once in a while when there is a sale. I should have mentioned it in my post, but I thought it was assumed that I was talking about vegetables that are not organic against vegetables that were. And seasonable against non seasonable, not against buying packages of Stouffers against making the spaghetti and meatballs from scratch.
@coffeeshot (3786)
• Australia
26 Feb 08
Yeah it sure is. Vegetables aren't exactly cheap (especially organic) and it's so cheap to buy pre packaged foods. However, I've been watching my budget lately and there are plenty of ways to eat healthily on a budget. It just takes a bit of researching and preparation. I have also started to grow some vegetables in my garden so I will be able to eat healthy fresh, non contaminated vegies such as corn, beetroot, carrot, capsicum and tomatoes.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
11 Jun 08
My husband does not want me to have a garden and I do not have enough money to make a container garden. The only reason that I have a raspberry and strawberry patch is because it was on the other side near the neighbor's fence and not near the lawn. If that was on the other side, I would not have that and besides he expects that I would not have time to write my novel or be on the computer, I would have to work at housework and gardening all day. I did buy a couple of blueberry plants, but that was all I could afford. I have a friend of a friend who will give me some vegetables from her garden but that will not be until fall.
@LittleMel (14055)
• Canada
26 Feb 08
only two of us and the cat, our grocery bill is not high at all. I am not the bread winner for now, but since I don't eat much meat it is never a problem what meat my husband buys for himself. he does buy organic now, he thinks it's best for his health as he is getting older but not able to skip meat like I do. I understand that organic meat is more expensive but with rice and vegetables it sure be able to fill you up ready for work. that's how we do it.
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
11 Jun 08
My husband is in charge of the money. I find that if I have to buy anything healthier at the Bulk Food Store it has to come out of my money, but when we go to the Superstore, he decides what we buy. I was lucky this week that I was able to pick up a loaf of whole grain bread at half price, but usually that never happens. We do not get the organic meat or the produce. That is way too much for our budget. I do not understand why he is this way. I think it is how he grew up.