To tip or not to tip, that is the question!!

@mommyboo (13198)
United States
May 12, 2008 10:58pm CST
How do you feel about gratuities (tips) added to your bill as a matter of course without it being your option to choose the amount? Some finer restaurants have this information in small print on their menus, basically telling the diner/guest that for parties of more than 6 or 8 people or a total above a certain amount, they have the right to ADD IN a tip percentage! I've seen it listed as high as 18%! I disagree with this and here is why. A tip should be based on SERVICE, not the quality of the food or even necessarily the atmosphere of the establishment. Without having had the meal, there is no way to know whether you may get a disagreeable or ill waiter or waitress, a problem like a stackup of orders causing your meal(s) to take extra time, a melt-down of one of your children, etc. Giving a tip should always be a choice and given based on having excellent service, it has nothing to do with the number of people in your party, how long you spend having your meal, or how much you spend on your meal!
1 person likes this
5 responses
@lvaldean (1612)
• United States
3 Aug 08
If it is stated on the menu or when you make the reservation than you are agreeing to a contract up front. If the service is poor the way you disengage this part of the contract is to call the manager over prior to the bill arriving and complain about the service. Generally in upscale restaurants the reason for this "rule" is there are more than one wait person assigned to larger parties. This means that a backup person must be assigned taking away from other tables service they require. Service for larger parties is more difficult and generally speaking larger parties stay at their tables longer and tip smaller overall based on the bill. I know a tip is intended to "reward" good service. But most wait staff earn their primary income from tips. So if they are serving a large party that evening in general their income will be lower because their table turn will be lower. It is an economic issue for both the staff and the resturant. The establishment is trying to protect their staff as well as themselves. So if you did not receive good service, before you ask for the bill call over the manager and tell him/her specifically why the service was poor and what tip you will agree to. If you simply are being cheap and don't wish to pay the usual 18% tacked onto a large party bill you should not eat there next time.
1 person likes this
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
3 Aug 08
The only time I don't appreciate it is if they state that they add an 18% gratuity on for parties of 6 or more - and 4 of my 6 are under age FIVE! I do not feel that is fair, especially when there are only two adults eating lol. The other time I don't feel it is fair is if again it's parties of 5 or 6 or more, and the place is pricey enough that we are already paying on an avg $80-100 per couple. That means for a party of six, they are getting $300 from us, I would think it was just fine for each couple to tip $12-15 or so and not be required to pay them $54 or whatever they decide to add on.
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
3 Aug 08
BTW I understand if it's like a party of 10 or 20, or 40 or something gigantic. That completely makes sense because usually you need 3 or 4 waitstaff and if anybody is making specific special orders, they deserve a great tip even more.
@arkaf61 (10882)
• Canada
3 Aug 08
I completely agree with you. I have no problem leaving a tip - I usually do - but I like it to be my choice and according to the service I got. I don't like it when people decided for me what I should do, no matter in what. I have already left a restaurant for that reason just as a matter of principle. I can leave a small tip or a big one even higher than 18% if I want to, but it has to be me deciding.
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
3 Aug 08
To me it is not a tip if somebody else forces you or chooses the amount. If places want to tack on something like that, call it 'an allowable surcharge' but make sure diners realize they will have something like that added before they even order. Unless it's a quality place that I go to often, I probably would choose to walk out when faced with something like a mandatory surcharge for being served!
1 person likes this
@arkaf61 (10882)
• Canada
3 Aug 08
Exactly. A tip is something we decide to leave, when it's forced upon us it becomes something else.. I don't know ... putting their hands in our pockets ? LOL
• India
3 Aug 08
I always give tips to waiters. But few times i didn't. Because of the behaviour of some of them. They sometimes show some rude behaviour, that can't bear. I know once i got down from hotel due to rude behaviour of hotel waiter, left a complaint.Thank you.
1 person likes this
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
3 Aug 08
Bottom line - people who choose to work in service types of profession where they are supposed to SERVE other people and come in contact with people whom they are supposed to make happy and impress - should be the types of people who can do the job without getting an attitude, resenting customers, being rude, etc. If you are not a people person, go work somewhere where you never have to see another soul! It only makes sense. It's even more silly when you're PAYING them for a service and they are nasty - you're basically giving them their paycheck and they don't appreciate it!
@34momma (13895)
• United States
13 May 08
I am with you girl and i don't like to go to places that tell me how much I have to tip someone before they even come over to the table. don't that i do much fine dinning with my family, or large group dinning either, however i try to stay away from any place that tells me what to do with my money
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@egdcltd (6905)
13 May 08
I agree also, tips should be based on quality of service. If the tips guaranteed anyway, there's no real incentive to provide good service.
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