If you were limited only three hours of water use, what would you do?

@kaysue4 (951)
United States
May 25, 2008 6:17pm CST
I was reading last year that there was a town down south that ran out of water for the town. The mayor would take the fire truck and fill up the water tower and then the people were only allowed to use water for 3 hours a day. So, what would you do if you were limited to only 3 hours of water a day?
5 people like this
15 responses
@jonesy123 (3950)
• United States
25 May 08
Take a quick shower, run the laundry machine, and fill up enough buckets with water to get my family and myself through the day until we have our next chance at water again. In a situation like that, water should definitely not be wasted. I probably would try not to even take a shower everyday but alternate it. I heard about that little town, too. It's a bad situation and if it continues the town will be doomed. I don't think too many people will put up with a situation like that every summer/fall.
2 people like this
@kaysue4 (951)
• United States
25 May 08
You could use rain water also, if you got any at all, for different things also. I wonder if the town ever got the rain they needed.
@Adelida2233 (1008)
• United States
25 May 08
I probably use 3 hours of water use now. It's only my boyfriend and I, so that makes a difference I suppose. Our showers are usually about 20 minutes each, and that's a generous assessment, usually its about half of that. We do approximately 1 load of laundry a day, and the water running is about 20 minutes(maximum, I've never stood there and timed it.) That's hour one. Hour two: Making tea, coffee, refilling bottled water for necessity. Hour three: I have no idea. Clearly I don't use nearly as much water as some people however, families of 5 would get close to that with just showers....
@kaysue4 (951)
• United States
25 May 08
So true. I didn't think about family size and the amount used. I am glad that I have my own well water and have never had a problem. If we had to pay for water, we wouldn't be able to afford it at all.
1 person likes this
• United States
25 May 08
I think family size is the most important part. Kids have no idea about paying for stuff like water and tv because there isn't a tangible product. It's easy to teach them with groceries and stuff, because they can literally see th candy bar or drink or whatever, but electricity and water "just happen". Family size, especially including kids would have to be the greatest barrier to the 3 hour rule.
1 person likes this
• United States
26 May 08
We're on water restrictions (relaxed, currently), but nothing as extreme as that, thankfully. I'd shower. I'd do laundry, if it needed to be done. I'd do dishes. I'd water my gardens, if the runoff from the laundry and bath weren't enough. Then I'd save enough to keep my guy, my pets, and I in water for a few days. I'd also have a cistern installed.
@kaysue4 (951)
• United States
26 May 08
You could also use the dish water for watering flowers I think. Do you have barrels set out to catch the rain water? What is a cistern?
• Philippines
25 May 08
i would do the same as jonesy123--fill up and store water in big buckets for the days use.But when i shower i'll limit my use to a small pail instead of using a big pail.If water is really dofficult-- conserving the water from my shower into laundry basins for use to flush the toilet--would be an add on.We bought drums to store rain water last year,so maybe rain water to wash dishes,laundry,etc. whew. that is tough.Water is really imporant.we most often take water for granted as it is readily available to us daily.We dont give much value on them until they're scarce or gone.. good post.thanks kaysue.:))
1 person likes this
@kaysue4 (951)
• United States
26 May 08
Thank you. Yes, most of us just open the tap and don't relize how it is important to us on a daily basis. I want to get a hand pump for my well incase something would happen and the electric went out. Our whole house is electric and so if it goes out, we have no water. I think I would boil the rain water before using it for drinking water though. Thanks for adding to the discussion.
@goldeneagle (6776)
• United States
25 May 08
Well I live close to a river, so if things really got tight, water wouldn't be a problem as long as I could boil it. It would be a real inconvenience to have to drive over there and get it, but it could be done. I would try to store enough during the three hours to get through until the next day. Then I would do some laundry.
1 person likes this
@kaysue4 (951)
• United States
26 May 08
You are lucky to have a river not far from you. About 10 miles or so there is a natural spring, so if I could afford the gas, I would drive there to get water also for drinking. I would boil it also, but if there is some thing really bad, I don't know if the spring would be going.
• Canada
25 May 08
For me it's about the amount of water, no the time it takes to use it. I would put aside a couple of emergency buckets of water to flush the toilet (you know how the saying goes, if it's yellow, let it mellow, if it's brown, blush it down,) and I would also plug in a dehumidifier to take water out of the air, using THAT to flush the toilet with, too. I'd put aisde jugs of water for drinking and cooking, and only take a shower every few days. Cleanliness is one thing, but wouldn't a person be better off DRINKING the water, in an emergency?
1 person likes this
@newtondak (3950)
• United States
26 May 08
The dehumidifier is a good idea - I wouldn't have thought of that one!
• Canada
26 May 08
i would drink for 2 hrs straight, and then i would have a bath and wash up
1 person likes this
• United States
25 May 08
Well right now there are six people in my family. What I would do is for each of us to take a bath and make sure to clean ourselves well. Since it's summer now we would make sure to fill enough bottles and whatever else we can find so that we can drink water thoughout the day. So we would have water to drink, water to cook. Wait if the water was only for three hours that would mean that the toilet wouldn't work after the water is shut off. So I guess we would have to put water away for the toilet too. So it would be a lot of water saved for the whole day.
1 person likes this
@saundyl (9698)
• Canada
27 May 08
We've had our pump shut down in our well or the pipes burst during the winter. Rather than showering my family would fill the tub and each have a bath, change the water when its too dirty for the next person. I already buy bottled water for drinking. I would do a load laundry a day. Put water into containers for pets, flushing, dishes, house cleaning, hand washing and watering plants in my house. I would put out barrels for rain water (hoping for rain). In a case like that i can see stores having a very big run on bottled water.
@sun2day (1063)
• Virgin Islands (U.S.)
26 May 08
I would get as many large containres as I can to store water. I would take a quick shower, and would clean up the dishes. And the following day I would do some laundry. I have been out of water in our house many times where you could not wash up dishes for two days, it is not a good feeling. Water is essential to life.
@ajayrekha (491)
• India
26 May 08
First thing I will do is to best utilize the availability of water in those crucial three hours. Fill the water tank of my house, try to finish my regular water related work like washing clothes, car etc in those 3 hours. Secondly, I will try to understand the gravity of the problem by socializing myself with others on this issue and if possible will try to contribute to get over with this problem.
@newtondak (3950)
• United States
26 May 08
Take a shower, wash dishes and do laundry. I'd also fill up whatever containers I had with water to use the rest of the day.
@jer31558 (3684)
• United States
26 May 08
I would get a bunch of gallon jugs and fill them up. If you are talking about outside water usage, I would water my lawn....well that is if I had one.
@punlonnjack (1309)
• United States
26 May 08
i would fill up with empty container as many as i could.. i would shower, do dishes and laundry.
@agihcam (1916)
• Philippines
26 May 08
If three hours volume of water can fill many drums then I will go that way, after getting enough of water for drinking, then fill drums for restroom use and for laundry as well.Avoid using flash if possible since it consume much water than manual flashing.