The New Face of the McCain Campaign

United States
October 12, 2008 7:06pm CST
If you happened to catch Sarah Palin's campaign rally speech this afternoon, I'm sure you noticed a very different atmosphere and focus. The most negative thing said about Obama was that he says one thing in a small town and something far different in other places. The rest of the speech was devoted to talking about McCain's heroism, his maverick status and his intent to cut taxes, cut spending, inspire investments and create new jobs. There was not a boo to be heard. What a difference a day - and a different speech - makes. The new McCain slogan - turning your anger into action. I'm relieved - but I'm thoroughly disgusted with the way the campaign spokespeople - Tucker Bounds in particular - are trying to characterize the outrage people felt last week as Obama and his supporters playing the race card and protecting him from 'legitimate questions that he has never answered', and the incidents at the rallies as trivial - just a few nuts like you get at any rally. Are we supposed to believe that we were all under a collective delusion over the past week? Do you believe that the McCain campaign was victimized by Obama supporters 'pulling the race card' to protect him?
4 people like this
4 responses
@spalladino (17925)
• United States
13 Oct 08
Sure, it wasn't the Republican's or Palin's fault...it was the mean ole Obama supporters pulling the race card! They FORCED Palin scare people by repeatedly saying things like this: "There's been a lot of interest in what I read lately," Mrs Palin said. "Well, I was reading my copy of today's New York Times, and I was really interested to read about Barack's friends from Chicago. Turns out, one of his earliest supporters is a man who, according to The New York Times, was a domestic terrorist and part of a group that, quote, 'launched a campaign of bombings that would target the Pentagon and the US Capitol'. These are the same guys who think patriotism is paying higher taxes." "This is not a man who sees America as you and I see America," Palin said of Obama. "We see America as a force for good in this world. We see America as a force for exceptionalism. . . . Our opponents see America as imperfect enough to pal around with terrorists who would bomb their own country." "Our opponent though is someone who sees America, it seems, as being so imperfect, imperfect enough that he is palling around with terrorists who would target their own country," "America needs more energy; our opponent is against producing it." Victory in Iraq is finally in sight, and he wants to forfeit." Terrorist states are seeking nuclear weapons without delay; he wants to meet them without preconditions," "Al Qaeda terrorists still plot to inflict catastrophic harm on America, and he's worried that someone won't read them their rights." No, we weren't under a collective delusion and there weren't just a few nuts at the rallies. The McCain camp publically said that they were going to ratchet up their attacks on Obama and they did. The result was that they generated fear, anger and hatred and they only stopped because it was making the nightly news and they were looking bad.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Oct 08
I'd argue that some of those statements - while they are snide - are not over the line, unless you consider them as part of a whole. There are points of disagreement in policy, even if they are couched in campaign rhetoric and exaggerated - oh, and mostly not true. Lying about your opponent is a time-tested if not honored part of campaigning. But the main thrust of most of those statements is absolutely to fuel fear, anger and hatred.
@mcat19 (1358)
• United States
13 Oct 08
I'm sorry to say that I believe McCain and his group suddenly realized the harm he was doing with his and Palin's rhetoric and pulled back. It's sad that they couldn't think before they did it. But it is indicative of McCain's erratic behavior. I'm glad he toned it down. I don't think Obama ever pulled the race card. He's trying to bring Americans together.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27238)
• United States
13 Oct 08
Of course it's a "relief" that they've toned down their rhetoric because with the reactions from some of those attending their rallies who knows what may happen, but I think it's a shame there was so much to tone down to begin with and I sincerely hope it's not too late. Obviously, I don't mean "too late" for the McCain campaign but too late to prevent something bad from happening. For those of you whom I know will be quick to say neither McCain nor Palin were responsible for the words of their supporters and that they wouldn't be responsible for any actions they may take, you're right, people are responsible for their own actions and the things that Palin in particular was saying in her rather hateful speeches couldn't by themselves cause someone to commit a violent act but I think any of us with a shred of common sense know there are enough crazies in this country today who don't really need much pushing. I share your disgust at the McCain spokespeople who now are managing to somehow spin it as if it were all Obama's fault and that he's the one who somehow started this mudslinging. Somehow "mudslinging" doesn't seem to be a strong enough word but if I were to say anything the slightest bit stronger I'D be the one accused here of somehow accusing the McCain/Palin camp of racism. Someone implying by association that someone is a terrorist doesn't compare with saying someone would continue the failed Bush policies, especially when the latter's own words back up that claim since they refuse to answer what they'd do different from the current Administration. Annie
• United States
13 Oct 08
I have no compunction about using a word stronger than mud-slinging. It was rabble-rousing and hate-mongering - and there's nothing racist in that. Just because some racist speech is hate speech, it does not follow that all hate speech is racist. I've already said that I don't think the speeches were inherently racist - but they WERE speech designed to foster fear and incite anger and hate no matter how they try to spin it. Just for fun, though, pop on over to here: http://blogs.abcnews.com/politicalpunch/2008/10/more-mixed-mess.html and scroll down to read about the prayer that was offered by Pastor Arnold Conrad at a McCain event yesterday.
@irisheyes (4373)
• United States
13 Oct 08
Oh, I think Sarah from the frozen North was just so concentrated on smiling and answering the pageant judge's question that she really didn't even hear the guy yelling "Kill Him". Give a ditz a break! Just PLEASE don't let her take it anywhere near the White House.