God Out Of Schools?

United States
December 9, 2009 9:15pm CST
I'm not sure I understand the concept, except for the fact that someone might be offended that schools are including God in our children's education. Is that all it takes? If that's the case, then I'm offended that this valuable asset to a child is not being given more respect. I know I'm not the only one out there. Saying the pledge of allegiance every morning before the start of classes built character in young students - it seems to have disappeared. Our nation was founded under God. Our constitution is written under God. We purchase everyday items with "In God We Trust" written on every piece of U.S. currency. I think it is extremely closed minded and ignorant of people to close God out of a child's life altogether.
1 person likes this
12 responses
@uath13 (8207)
• United States
10 Dec 09
Out of schools doesn't " close God out of a child's life altogether". Take them to CHURCH. That's where they're supposed to learn about god.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Dec 09
When a parent drops a child off at church and then comes home to find that God isn't there, or in school, do you expect they will be good people when they are not led by example? You are your child's role model. They will do as you do as as their peers do - hence building character and moral values that they can carry with them throughout their lives.
@uath13 (8207)
• United States
10 Dec 09
Moral values don't come from religion. If your expecting them to then your sadly mistaken. You have to show your kids how to live well whether you believe or follow god ( or any gods for that matter ) or not. Religion has been the cause of many of the moral atrocities in the world.
2 people like this
@puppynut (370)
• New Zealand
14 Dec 09
A christian spirit filled family is a firm and stabled moral ground for a child, but please note the difference between spirit filled and someone who sadly misses the joy of christian life by forcing their own values into anyone else.
• United States
10 Dec 09
This is a question that has bothered me for 30+ years now..As I understand it, since public schools are funded by the government AND because of the misinterpretation of the seperation of church and state private issues, such as religious beliefs, can be banned in public schools..OK..But who funds the government? Taxpayers of course!..And are there God fearing taxpayers? But of course!..So, God fearing folks are expected to pay the price to support these schools at which their children are denied the full spectrum of education. There is a solution that I offered up those 30 some years ago. God fearers should withhold a percentage of their taxes and use that money to fund education that includes God. Non-God folks can then pay their education taxes thru the government and support the Godless education they want for their kids..That's what I call '..liberty and justice for all!' because each side then supports the education they believe in. For the record and for your understanding of where this notion arose from I was raised Catholic and went to Catholic School thru High School. I knew my dad was paying for our schooling out of pocket and when I was old enough to ask such questions I asked why he had to pay. Neighborhood friends' parents didn't have to pay!..And it was explained to me about the difference between public and private school and how the government supports one but not the other, despite the fact that it took taxes from both parents of private and public schooling..I asked why and was told its the law..And wondered what part of The Constitution allowed the government that was '..of, by and for the people' to blatantly discriminate like that because I didn't recall it from our studies of The Constitution. I agree that God belongs in ALL schools. Were we closer to our country's roots then it would be easier done. We aren't and for that reason its not very likely to happen. The Constitution has been so badly butchered over the last 30 years that, as it reads now, it is in itself unconstitutional..Allowing for such things as the elimination of God in schools and public places as well so that the non-God people can exploit the God fearers thru taxes to fund their Godless existence and have the gall to call it equality!
• United States
10 Dec 09
Thank you, and God Bless you fellow Catholic-Christian. We need more of you in this declining nation filled with what they claim to be 'atheists' or whatevers.
@uath13 (8207)
• United States
10 Dec 09
The government isn't allowed to fund non christian schools either. There are lots of other religions that aren't taught in school also. With your logic only true atheists would be in public schools. Every non-atheist would then be expected to pay for their own kids education. Most people couldn't afford to do that directly out of pocket. We'd end up with an almost totally uneducated society. Such action would move us back to a near medieval system.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Dec 09
Or forward if we start thinking outside the box?
@nicholejade (2430)
• Canada
10 Dec 09
I agree that religion shouldn't be taught to children in schools. Because the lords prayer is set for Christianity where does that meet with other religions. With schools they have many different types of children with different religions. If you are going to instill one relgion you must put it all in and sorry to say that would take quite awhile to get through. Taking away time from them to be learning what they are sent to school in the first place for. It's fine if you want your child to have that religion but if you want them to learn about it send them to church. That is where it is ment to be learned. You can't make a child do it either and really it's not fair to the other religions and the children who their parents didn't push god on them. I was one that wasn't instilled with this god image. But that doesn't make me any less of a person.
• United States
10 Dec 09
Religion is not restricted to Christianity or Catholicism. Religion is a general term for an organized group of believers or followers for one or more entities, which includes Hindu, Buddhism, Islam and many others. As a college student having taken several religious studies courses, I wish I was exposed to all these religions earlier. As a child I did feel a little shut out from others because I was kept in a straight line and wasn't allowed to research polytheistic entities until a couple years ago. No matter what religion you are, church won't do the job. If a child is exposed to it a t home, that helps, but any child psychology professional will tell you that children respond the best and perform at their peak when their peers are doing the same around them. At the very least, I would like to see religious education so that students are exposed to multiple religions, and if teachers could use their pupils for lesson plans the better. Say there's a Buddhist, several Christians and a few Islamic as well as several Mormons and a couple Jehovah's Witnesses, the teacher could cover these so nobody feels like a 'freak' or a 'weirdo' and each religion is unique and respectible. They might even have a system for parents to sign their children out of a certain religious session if they choose - its an idea, although it may not go over very well - I feel its a start, anyway :)
@poingly (606)
• United States
10 Dec 09
mrsellis, you have a somewhat open mind about teaching religion (sort of like how it was taught to me in public school growing up). However, the problem you face is from religious groups. Though a lot of religious groups would happily have their religion taught alongside many others in a religion course, there are others who (although they fully say they support "God in the classroom") get really upset when that God is anyone other than their own (even in the context of a religion class). Religion class is not usually what people mean when they talk about "God in the schools" though.
• Canada
10 Dec 09
I didn't restrict religion strictly being Christianity. But we all thats the only religion that they did instill in schools when it was allowed. I grew up in a school that had to say the lords prayer everyday. And if you didn't say it you would get into trouble. I'm sorry no one is going to instill one religion or another into me as I am simply not intrested in and I don't want someone to sit there and tell me that I have to do it. If you want your child to learn about god etc find a school that instills otherwise keep it out of public schools as it stands now.
@jennybianca (12915)
• Australia
11 Dec 09
Schools In australia that are Government schools, do not have God at all in their agenda, curriculum or any kind of event. The belief is that our schools are secular. Religion is a private thing, and not for schools to get involved in, in any way. I am over 50 and never had God at school. My parents sent me to Sunday School instead, of the religion of their choice.Of course, if parents in Australia want God in the childs education, they are free to send their children a religious private school. Many do.
@jennybianca (12915)
• Australia
11 Dec 09
I dont mind if you rave on. I do that when I have a strong viewpoint. I have no problem with kids wanting to pray before they eat or whatever, dont think our system is that inflexible. And of course, they can chat about their beliefs. No problem with that. We have compulsory school uniforms and a limited jewellry code, so religion wouldnt come into that.
@puppynut (370)
• New Zealand
14 Dec 09
In New Zealand there has recently been a big issue about allowing religious head dress in schools so religion does indeed come into uniform issues, and a crucifix should also be allowed. It is a difficult topic but it is great how different religions are accepting each other so well nowadays. We see all the bad inter-religious extremist wars but we forget about the lovely friendships that develep between people of different religions.
@hvedra (1623)
10 Dec 09
Which constitution is that then? Obviously not the one where the First Amendment enshrines the right to freedom of religion. "under god" was added to the Pledge of Allegiance in 1954. The bank notes of the US are issued by the Federal Reserve Bank which is a privately owned institution NOT a government one. Which god would you like included in your child's education? Jehovah? Osiris? Thor? Shiva? The Flying Spaghetti Monster? If you want ONE religion in schools you are going to have to allow all of them - is that what you want. There are plenty of opportunities to introduce religion to kids but these often require an effort on the part of the parents so perhaps you should look there as to why kids aren't getting religion. It is not the school's responsibility - do you really want people you don't truly know in charge of instructing kids in beliefs? It is easy to blame "those people" but really, every parent is responsible for how they raise their kids and what religion they teach them or, rather the SHOULD be responsible but most are too lazy and self-absorbed to bother.
• United States
10 Dec 09
I appreciate your ability in forcing me to do some research and thinking. I do not intend to come back gnashing my teeth like most believe Christians do in regards to religious matters. You are half right. God was added to the Pledge of Allegiance in 1954 - I bow out. However, "The Federal Rserve is not "owned" by anyone and is not a private, profit-making institution. Instead, it is an independent entity within the government, having both public purposes and private aspects." www.federalreserve.gov/generalinfo/faq/faqfrs.htm I do not want teachers instructing my children in what to believe, but I don't want them or anyone else's children getting in trouble when they state their beliefs. Everyone has a right to their own God, and at least they believe in something and follow some set of values set forth by those they worship/idolize/look up to/follow - that's all it takes to build character, is to believe there is an afterlife, that there are morals and values in this world and respect comes with respecting. I would not be against religious education in our schools, where teachers cover monotheism, polytheism and others, and not be strictly confined to forcing the belief of the Christian God. Yes, allow all gods in school - it builds a well rounded child and later in life they can 'choose' to become an atheist or agnostic, but at least they will have the knowledge and exposure to make that decision on their own. You are 100% right about it being the parents' responsibility, I am not denying that. That's the truth, though, most ARE too lazy or just don't care - that's what bothers me the most, and that's why some exposure to religion in general is so valuable in our youth, because again they aren't being taught these valuable lessons of morals and respect for others, which build them a foundation they can come back to later in life. Thank you for your input - you made me think!
@vikkiz (519)
16 Dec 09
I disagree with you, I believe that in primary school children should be taught about religion so they can understand and respect it, but in high school i think religion as no place. I am not offended by it and im not offended by someone teaching my child about religion, The reason i disagree with you is religious studys in high school get you nowhere?? (please tell me if you think im wrong?) Instead of religious studys there should be more english and maths..you know subjects that can actually get you a job. I was bought up a catholic and was sent to a catholic school and i hated it i didnt believe in god and i never will do now i am a sworn atheist. I was sent to 4 lessons per week about religion and was made to go to mass 1 morning of every week. Thats nearly 10 hours out of the 30 hour school week! We are sent to school to learn and to get an education which leads to what kind of job we will get. And unless everyone is planning on being a priest or a nun religious studys holds no place in high school teaching.
@vikkiz (519)
16 Dec 09
I also may add that even though u believe we were founded by god... I do not believe that. If you can find the proof that god founded us one day then ill be happy to listen to you. ( I hope i havnt caused you any offence either as that was not my intention just wanted to state my opinion on this aswell)
@pinetree (218)
• China
10 Dec 09
Yea, it's important to make a child know God, as in our school, the principles are based on God, the children here are very different from the children from the school not founded based on God.
• United States
10 Dec 09
In the United States of America, public schools have practiced what the Constitution stood for since schools have existed - until now. Teaching others is a gift from God, but when children don't know that, how are hey to respect their teachers, peers, siblings or parents. Why are so many children hard to control and why has the uptick for ADD/ADHD children rose so radically the last 5 - 10 years? The children are not sick, they aren't being taught respect for others, their elders or themselves.
• Philippines
10 Dec 09
Well, I am glad that you are one of the few in here who is observant to what is happening in many countries who prosper with God's blessing. America became prosperous and mighty because the early forefathers have put their trust in God in their schools, in their money, in their senate, in their congress, in their homes, in their constitution, and in their personal life. Nowadays, it cannot be said anymore. America is going down and I believe that any country removing God in their government will find out soon that they will collapse. Anyway, we can start in our own life and in our own family. Blessing2u
• United States
10 Dec 09
Thank you, and Amen to you and your values!
@puppynut (370)
• New Zealand
14 Dec 09
I suppose the main reason for taking God out of schools is because of the amount of different religions that attend public schools. I personally think it would be great to see more Christian Schools founded so people can choose to have God back in School. I guess my main question is 'Why Not?'. Why have we not already got more christian schools happening. I guesss the answer is due to funding or some kind of red tape. Maybe someone can fill me in as to why we can't establish more Christian Based schools and organisations? Political correctness has really taken away the average Christians ability of free speech.
• United States
12 Dec 09
The Constitution is founded under god? Really? Have you ever read it? There is no mention of Yahweh, Jesus or Christianity in the Constitution. It is a secular document that establishes a secular government. The preamble begins with "We the People" not "We for Jesus."
@EvanHunter (4028)
• United States
11 Dec 09
I went to a school tonight that was 6th graders to 12th graders putting on there Christmas musical. I was kind of shocked that they included a lot of hymnal type Christmas music along with traditional Christmas music. Now I know all about winter solstice and how Christmas has no biblical backing and began as a pagan tradition. But listening to those kids play their hearts out was wonderful. Of course the thought ran through my mind that somewhere in that very city there was one or more people mad that it was going on. My feelings are if you don't like it than don't participate no one is forcing you to go.
@poingly (606)
• United States
10 Dec 09
The US government was founding on the idea that everyone has the right to his or her own beliefs about God (even down to the existence of such a Deity itself). This country was founded on a certain amount of respect for each other. I am fine with teaching children ABOUT religion. We learned about various faiths in my public high school growing up--Islam, Judaism, Christianity, Buddhism, Shintoism, and even Satanism (no, I'm not kidding--we ended up learning about it because of the classroom groups decided that was the religion they were going to present about)...and this was already by the time people claimed God was out of the classroom. This is very different from including religion in other subjects or at other times in the school day. God is not closed out, but the classroom is also no place for the indoctrination of any particular religion.