Do you appreciate rap music?

Jay-Z - Rapper
@mjcookie (2273)
Philippines
February 13, 2010 1:03am CST
I like some rap unless 90% of its lyrics is profanity. I used to like every rap song that is released. But that was before. Now my taste in music has changed. Now I like listening to slow songs, whereas before I don't love them that much. They're more touching and appealing to the senses, while most rap music is so fast and monotonous that you barely catch up. I also noticed that rap songs easily lose their popularity, maybe because they're not catchy enough and they don't arouse the feelings that much. How about you? How do you like rap?
6 people like this
29 responses
@ridwan08 (1184)
• Indonesia
13 Feb 10
I like Rap music when I was in High school and now i prefer to pop and RnB music,my taste in music has changed too.If I'm listening Rap music i have spirit from this song.and good for hang out.
1 person likes this
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
13 Feb 10
I understand the "conversion". When I was in high school I loved hip-hop and fast songs really much. Now it's a different case. It's important that we choose what music we listen to, because we may not be aware of it: music influences us either in a good or bad way. Thank you.
1 person likes this
• India
13 Feb 10
Yes i do appreciate rap music and i used to hang out with them when i feel alone.
1 person likes this
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
13 Feb 10
Thanks for the response. The beat of rap music can surely make people high.
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Feb 10
Arranging samples is music composition. The only difference between dictating to an orchestra of ready-made-musicians what to play and how, and actually selecting, changing, and manipulating a wide array of sounds down to every possible minutia of it's subsonic analysis and musical element through digital structuring and orchestration - with the same musical theory as your basis for understanding, and one step further with the mathematical and physics training that platinum level engineering requires - is just the writing out of sheet music on paper (which can still be done in hip-hop at the artist's whim), rather than simply noting to yourself visually and mentally what the method to your masterpiece is. All musical instrumentals are predisposed to the originator's sense of melody, and no matter how well you play the instrument, you are merely rehashing the basic notes and ideals of the instrument itself that another has created and essentially building a hand-made interpolation of what in all actuality is the "original" sample. This is only different in perception to what one does with loops, samples, and digital midi composition. Excellent DJ'ing takes far more skill, talent, and manual dexterity than the average person could ever hope to have without decades of practice, training, understanding, and discipline. To watch a world championship scratch competition with the most elite of all DJ's and walk away saying "anybody can do that... all you do is play records and mess it up" is like watch an incredible guitarist, such as Steve Vai and saying "that's easy... all you do is mash your fingers and pluck strings." There is no way on earth that a person's favorite musicians in any genre would ever be able to do what DJ QBert does (who was at one time forced to retire and concede his domination of the WDJC league, because he was simply unstoppable and scientifically more skilled and perfect than all competitors who were eons behind him in terms of technique and musicianship). Beatbox is the raw, unfiltered capacity of the human body to emit music. It's actually much more a pure, and 1st hand form of musical expression than manipulating preset sounds on someone else's invention - ie: traditional musical instruments which are 2nd hand dilution of the musical spirit that is bound within the soul of an artist's body. Excellent beat boxing requires not only an inborn talent for melody and rhythm, but also years of practice and studying to learn the different techniques involved in manipulating one's vocal chords, tongue, and lips in methods that have been scientifically and technically documented in written instructions since the 80's. It's roots can be found in meditation, where one must literally espouse two separate vocal tones and pitches from one set of vocal chords to achieve true harmony and zen when clearing one's mind and dutifully serving a higher end. Unlike formal training and musical theory, beat box is built on nothing but it's own devices of ingenuity. You are the instrument, the theory, the student, and the active 1st hand listener all at once. There is no true alpha, for you emit and dictate the sound free of all predisposition and regiments. Although it is a preexisting idea and is influenced by sensory experience, beatbox is raw ability without constraints devoid of 2nd hand manipulations of previous innovations or the reinterpretation of said expression through said devices. It's a much less limited and innovative than playing an instrument that you did not create yourself, or merely derived from another, that basically rehashes the 128 powers in an ultimately finite context. Music theory in general is all derivative of that which precedes it. Merely playing a piano, or arranging notes, is taking an existing concept and it's constrained fundamentals that have already been set in place by a previous innovator and doing nothing more than remaking it in your own way. That is much the same spirit that drives the art and craft of sampling, scratch, or digital arrangement and composition, but far less humble and self styled. On top of that, alot of hip-hop acts and producers do play or use live instrumentation. There is an innumerable amount of producers in this day and age, from the 100 thousand or so underground beatsmiths, to some of the biggest names in the industry compose their own music by hand, all from scratch, at least on a keyboard or with analog hardware. Acts such as Wyclef Jean and The Roots, to multitalented individuals who have self taught themselves to play a myriad of instruments (Andre 3000, RZA, Dr. Dre, Lil Wayne etc), or have worked with world class orchestras to facilitate their production or composing (Tonedeff's Archetype album, RZA's soundtrack work etc). From the aforementioned beatboxers, such as the king of the mouth-piece named Rahzel, to the flute master Greg Patillo, there is no limitation to hip-hop. The thing about hip-hop is it can employ everything from any form of music. An MC, rapper, or lyricist can rap over a banjo solo, a car alarm, a dog barking, or leaves rustling, as long as they adapt to it in rhythmic syntax vocally and in stanza. It could go so far as to be a complete symphony as the backdrop if desired, vocalized upon from beginning to end with a verse that lasts several hours, and it would be hip-hop. Any and all vocal techniques from any vocalization and genre can be incorporated into your delivery... it's by no means limited in any way, yet still has it's own unique attributes and innovative styles.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
16 Feb 10
Wow... That's a lot of explanation and technical terms there. I really appreciate it. Thank you for your insight. Are you a musician?
• United States
17 Feb 10
No, but I am a lyricist, song writer, and poet, and have dabbled in production and sound engineering from time to time. I have no formal musical education, but hip-hop is my medium of choice, and I feel that it's unfairly represented in mainstream music as there is much on albums, in the underground/independent scene, and local scenes all around the world that really reflect alot more of the introspective, meaningful, and long lasting truths found in both the lyrical and musical aspects of the culture and craft of hip-hop. Like most art, it's simply exploited by big business to capture the attention of the youth and of consumers in general. I just wanted to take the opportunity to try and show that there's alot more to it than meets the eye. If you'd like, you can listen to some of my lyrics on http://www.ursession.com/NinjaMic - some songs do contain profanity, or humorous tangents into my own personality, but the majority of it is very poetic, soulful and insightful into my own thoughts. I don't do any choruses or hooks, I only do verses, and have a very low budget, but I write almost everyday, and try my best to really work with what I have and open up to the whoever will listen... free of charge.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
18 Feb 10
Hi, I have checked that link out.. You can really rap!! Wow, that's great. And I've read your bio. So your compositions (which are so many) are inspired by your life experiences? Just like what many rappers out there do. Good luck to you and keep that up!!
@commanderxo (1496)
• Canada
14 Feb 10
I've been a musician, composer, & lyricist for more than 40 years and I can assure you, that Rap, is definitely not "music". It may be listed as that, but it's not music per sa. No...what it IS, is POETRY set to a consistent back-beat, and that's all. Writing a piece of music, is much more involved. Rap on the other hand, involves very little writing and/or creativity, and THAT'S why it seems monotonous.......because IT IS. It's meant to be, and the "feelings" that it emotes in one, can hardly be what I'd call; "appealing to the senses". Now don't get me wrong. I love all kinds of music, and I suppose Rap has it's place (somewhere?). But don't confuse it with that, that is..."musical". History will bare me out, as my witness. Enjoy your music, and LISTEN to the words. LISTEN to the flow of the way notes are arranged. LISTEN to what the writer has painstakingly spent many hours, days, and/or years to create, and you will soon build a much higher appreciation for the craft, and why it differs from Rap as a likable medium. cdrxo
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
14 Feb 10
Wow! Thanks for that wonderful information and advice. Nice to hear it from an expert. I really appreciate it. Nothing really compares to soulful music, at least for me.
1 person likes this
• Canada
15 Feb 10
Oh yeah! Soul music would be nothing without the efforts of some great combos from the 60's and 70's...like: The 4 Tops, The Temptations, The Impressions, Sam & Dave, The Staple Singers, Commodores, Earth Wind & Fire, Gladys Knight & The Pips, The Spinners, Hall & Oats, The Platters, Booker T & The M.G.'s, The Isley Brothers. Or even the single artists of that era: Fats Domino, Otis Redding, Eddy Floyd, Ray Charles, Percy Sledge, Marvin Gaye, Smokey Robinson, Curtis Mayfield, Aretha Franklin (The Queen of Soul), Al Green, and who can forget James Brown, also known as: The Godfather of Soul. I know I've only scratched the surface of artists here, but these were/are MY favorites of that time, and man oh man, they most definitely have a lot of soul.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
16 Feb 10
Oh. I haven't been around that period, but I know The Temptations, Commodores, Earth, Wind, and Fire, The Platters, Ray, Smokey, Aretha, and James Brown, though I am not really familiar with all their songs.
1 person likes this
• Canada
20 Feb 10
not at all. Even if the lyrics were better, I can't stand the sound of it. I want music with a melody. I think that rappers sound way too angry, and it's just not "music" to me. I have perfect pitch, and play a number of instruments by ear. I can listen to a full orchestra, and tell you what every instrument is doing. For ME rap music is "dumbed down" for those who don't hear music the way that I do.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
20 Feb 10
I understand you. A lot of people feel the same way. Thank you very much for your response..
• United States
20 Feb 10
I respect our differences but give these a chance. This is Hip-Hop's diversity: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivml9whdKx4 - RZA, Bjork http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Phzw1VcM0l8 - Lauryn Hill http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLNPy97lZyU - DJ Qbert http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXmeayaHh4U - Greg Patillo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xi_amm31Wg - Tonedeff, Deacon http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GA-lfy5uOm0 - Canibus http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTNlcDP4-8o - Last Emperor, Poetic, Esthero http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjEhHTeAdpI - RZA, Rev William Burke Orchestra If a rapper raps to a complete symphony that you loved, it becomes hip-hop. I don't have the ear for classical music that you do, but I have the ear for this genre. I would love to do an entire album of poetry and lyrics to a beautiful, sweeping orchestra, but it would be difficult to sell lol
@pandaeyes (2068)
15 Feb 10
For me it has been a learning curve. About 3 years ago I would have said I hated it but then I listened to music on the internet as I worked on other things and I found that sometimes there was some excellent rap and also hip hop. I might not be as young as some music fans but I know when someone has put time and effort into getting the wording perfect and the timing spot on. Now when people say they don't like rap, I will say that they probably haven't heard anything good yet and that when they do it will be a revelation. Rap is like poetry it can be just as clever and emotional or it can be badly timed and performed.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
16 Feb 10
They haven't heard anything good yet because a lot of rap songs are bad . Or even when the lyrics are beautiful, people are already intimidated by the beat that they don't bother to listen anymore.
@pandaeyes (2068)
16 Feb 10
There are a lot of people out there who think aggression and confrontation make a good rap song and that just isn't so. It leaves the good rap artists with a huge mountain to climb because it is made so much harder by those who want kudos and easy money for not much talent.
@aerous (13465)
• Philippines
14 Feb 10
No..I don't like rap music, my friend. I never appreciate it because I hear it very unpleasant. I love country songs and love songs and I don't like rap the way it is dealing with...
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
16 Feb 10
I guess you are a very sentimental person with your type of music.
@aerous (13465)
• Philippines
16 Feb 10
Isn't that sentimental is good. I love those kind of music. Country songs and love songs...
• Boston, Massachusetts
14 Feb 10
Hi Mjcookie, Yes i love rap music. Since i was in my teen years i already have this appreciation with rap music. this was enhanced when i worked in the US and most of my co-workers love listening to rap music and we both enjoy listening and even rapping at the same time.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
16 Feb 10
That's nice.. Same taste of music, huh.
1 person likes this
• Boston, Massachusetts
16 Feb 10
Yes. Hurray and long live rap music! Have a great day!
@jambi462 (4597)
• United States
16 Feb 10
I appreciate virtually any kind of music as long as it's original and has some kind of uniqueness. A lot of the stuff on the radio though sounds like the same artists ripping off the sound of the artists that were popular before them. Rap nowadays is just some marketable images saying a couple of things through out a song. Just look at Soulja Boy and other mainstream rappers now a days. Compare them to such greats as 2pac, Notorious B.I.G., or Bone Thugs N Harmony and something and you will see why rap completely sucks compared to back in the 90's and earlier on.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
16 Feb 10
I see your point. I don't even understand what the words "crank that soulja boy" mean. I just find the song totally catchy. It's kinda awful when people sing your songs yet they don't even know what it means.
@secretbear (19464)
• Philippines
15 Feb 10
Hi mjcookie!^^ I like rap and hiphop music. But not because of the lyrics. Well, sometimes I like the lyrics too. But the thing I like about it is it's rhythm and beat. I always feel like dancing and bouncing when I hear 50cent, Jay-Z or some rapper.^^ My head always starts to go left and right, or bounce and bounce to the beat of the song. But I agree that a lot of rap and hiphop songs contain profanity and sometimes are offending some people. I don't like those kinds of songs. I think it's not good especially to minors. Music greatly influences people so we have to be careful on what we listen to or we have to be smart enough to choose which things to influence us.^^
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
16 Feb 10
I listen to rap too because of the beat. I just don't mind the lyrics anymore, as most of them I cannot understand.
@freymind (1352)
• Philippines
14 Feb 10
I do. I appreciate them. Specially here in our country, we have a nationalistic rapper, he was Francis M. But he already passed away due to cancer. But I will never forget the lyrics of his songs. They are rap but with meaning. This opened the minds of the Filipino youth on how to be patriotic, on how to love your country even in your own little way. I also like Glock 9, because of his political views that he writes on his songs. Hope that the government actually listens to the songs so that they could understand the sentiments of the people. They don't use profanity or foul words on there songs. But it will leave a mark on you specially if you are going to listen to them by heart.
• United States
14 Feb 10
I cannot stand it. It should not be considered a genre of music. IMO all it is words (usually profanity, nasty or insulting) to spoken with a beat.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
16 Feb 10
Yes, just like what the other people said. It's more of a poem put into beat than music. Not all rap songs are profane though, but a LOT of them.
@derek_a (10898)
14 Feb 10
I am a part of a writer's group and one of the writers often writes rap that sometimes I find (lyric-wise), very clever. This has made me listen to other rap music from time to time. As a musician myself, I wouldn't call it music, but poetry. And with all things, some can be good and some bad, but I can only listen to such constant rythm in shorts burst, perhaps one or two "songs", and then this rythm just gets monotous or even boring. But we all have different tastes, because if we didn't everything would be the same.. _Derek
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
16 Feb 10
I agree. Maybe rap is not just really for "long-term" listening.
@thuhuong (828)
• United States
14 Feb 10
Honestly I'm a rocker and when rap started crossing into the genre which a lot of artists are doing nowadays, I've began to question it more deeply and it's all about the game of the music business. Honestly, rap, rock, riff raff, I don't even care. When you sell out to make more money, in the end, it's not about the music, it's about the money and has always been.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
14 Feb 10
The fact that a lot of rappers today are very rich, such as Jay-Z, justifies your statement.
@zandi458 (27952)
• Malaysia
14 Feb 10
I never like rap. The lyrics are incomprehensible and sometimes the singers use a lot of stinky words in their lyrics. I don't think this type of music will go far compared to the evergreen country songs.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
14 Feb 10
Nowadays rap/hip-hop is really popular, and as much as a lot of people don't appreciate it, there are also many who support it. It's gonna be here for many years, since it's been out already decades ago.
@Opal26 (17690)
• United States
14 Feb 10
Hey mj! You won't believe me because I am one of the oldest rap fans there are! I happen to love rap and have for a long time! I love 50 Cent, Lil' Wayne, Eminem, JayZ, Drake, TI, and alot more rappers! My boyfriend and I are into R & B, Soul, Rhythm & Blues! I also love the old time Rock too! I am a serious music lover from way back so I have a variety of music that I listen to! I love Rhianna, Black Eyed Peas! You come near my house and it's always got some great music playing really loud!
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
14 Feb 10
Can't believe it. And you happen to know the latest rappers nowadays, Lil Wayne for one!! And I bet you know the term "auto-tune" as well, for which T-Pain is known for (the robot-like voice). You know what, I sometimes find Lil Wayne's voice annoying, but I guess that's what makes him unique. His participation in the new version of "We Are The World" either annoyed or amused people. And hey, I like BEP, too, and that one of them is half-Filipino makes me so proud of him (APL). Thanks for that interesting response, Opal26.
• Estonia
13 Feb 10
I used to listen to rap like 5 or 6 years ago. I liked 50 Cent back then. Now my choice of music has changed, I like rock music. Still, I like some songs from Eminem, because he really puts a lot of meaning into his songs, he is a very talented person. Most of gangsta rap I've heard is about smoking green and messing with the girls and fighting other gangs. I don't like such songs, because they're all are so similar to each other.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
14 Feb 10
I'd have to admit that Eminem is talented, but I don't like his parodies even when they're catchy. They're so mean, even if they were meant to entertain.
@Dezzaan (80)
• Sweden
13 Feb 10
I absolutely love rap songs! But I hate the songs that are about driving fast cars, girls etc. I love listening to songs with a message in it, songs that makes you stop and think a while. Most hiphop songs now a days are mainly club songs, all about cars, girls, weed and stuff like that, I hate that.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
14 Feb 10
Driving fast cars, hahaha!!! Reminds me of the words "lamborghini", "bling bling", "grills", and how the man wants to give his shawty everything he has to make her happy. Very materialistic and shallow. Same with you, I am fed up with those type of songs.
@coolcoder (2019)
• United States
13 Feb 10
I hate rap. I always have, and I always will. How in the world can a person listen to a genre of music that is so demeaning to women? It doesn't fly with me, and I look forward to the day when rap is officially thrown onto the trash heap of musical history.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
14 Feb 10
I agree with you, but not all of them are like that. There are still some out there that have good messages and are meant to inspire--an example is Black Eyed Peas' "Where Is The Love".
• Philippines
13 Feb 10
I like rap music too but I only have the likings on the mainstream ones. I don't go for pure rap energy stuffs. They are quite heavy on my part. Rap is considered classic and they already left a legacy on its own in the music industry. THe reason I like rap because they are quite catchy and some of them can be made into house music if you mix it with the DJs...rap music can be molded into a different kind of genre and can be derived from either classic, slow rock, alternative, emo type. It's quite fun listening to them. Aside from that the freedom of speech when it comes to rap is quite felt and they are considered very expressive for me. Rappers are considered geniuses...only few could actually do it...it's a talent. Some can be gifted to have this talent. I myself can't rap that well even if I follow their lyrics. In live shows, rap artists need the extra strength to go on because it uses raw energy and a lot of feelings are expressed through this music. Nice topic you started here mjcookie....happy mylotting.
@mjcookie (2273)
• Philippines
14 Feb 10
That's a good thought. It's really some talent!! I cannot deny that it takes a lot of work and talent to be able to rap well. You'd have to know the beat or else you'd be "out of tune". Thanks for responding.