US Mylotters..who did you Vote and why?

Philippines
April 8, 2010 8:18am CST
Hello lotters. Well, I already who had won but this is another kind of learning experience from me because i feel that my COUNTRY is on the verge on going in the WRONG track yet again coz most people are getting emotional and voting for some one who either don't have track record of approved bills, relies on dead parent's political popularity and the other kept on doing ads, which most children are imitating now. * the WORST part, is the surveys. i don't know how surveys are done in the US. but in here the candidate pays the survey company so that they will be added to the questionaire when ever they staff makes a survey on another place. not paying for it the candidates name won't be added on the survey. candidate says surveys like are illegal in the US. * Another worst part is that They back out on the recent debate but two candidates didn't but they canceled the event anyways, is this acceptable? I just wanted to ask something from you guys.seriously, why did you choose them and what was the basis? [b]track record? passed bills? handles and answers issues? you got emotional? white/black? Don't back out on Debates [/b] too many ads that even kids memorize the jingle? you don't want anymore illegal immigrants from my country? then, i suggest you need to help ME teach my people how to poke they're brains and tell them "that's not the right one, stupid" WHY DID YOU VOTE FOR HIM AND WHY? don't even tell me it's flip of a coin because some one already said that.lolz
4 people like this
10 responses
@spalladino (17925)
• United States
9 Apr 10
I voted for Obama because at some point John McCain lost his mind completely. I'm a Republican and I liked Romney...but McCain won the Primary so I was okay with that. He had a good record and shared many of my views. When Palin was first introduced as his running mate I had an open mind but it didn't take long for her to show the nation that she was an uninformed nutcase without a clue. When she started her "hate and fear" campaign, when she started trying to turning American against American, establishing that "real Americans" were the ones who agreed with her, my blood ran cold. I discussed my concerns and confusion here many times. When McCain was forced to tell a scared old lady at a rally that Obama was not a Muslim or someone she should be afraid of, as a direct result of what his out of control running mate was babbling on about, that did it for me. At the end of the day I could not risk this country to a team like that. So, I voted *against* the McCain/Palin ticket. The hate/fear campaign continues to this day. It's ugly and it's destructive...more destructive to this country than anything those who promote it accuse the president of doing.
@spalladino (17925)
• United States
9 Apr 10
Popularity does play a part but it's also about having confidence in the candidate. I suspect that McCain's team thought that Palin would draw in the disgruntled women who had supported Hillary Clinton in the Primary and that her record as governor of Alaska would make her a popular VP candidate. The first clue came during Palin's very first speech when she referenced the glass ceiling Clinton had repeatedly talked about during her campaign. And it might have worked if Palin had had any substance beneath the pretty picture, had been able to instill confidence with those other than her most adoring fans, and if she hadn't run such a nasty campaign that focused almost entirely on hatred and fear. The fact that McCain seemed incapable of controlling her caused concern to shift to him as well. And, yes, the issue of McCain's age & health became a concern when the person who would be president should something happen to him appeared to be such a loose cannon who was far from rational.
1 person likes this
@hofferp (4739)
• United States
8 Apr 10
I voted for John McCain because he was a lesser of two evils. Obama is too far left and too progressive (tax and spend) for me, and I believe, this country. How could I tell he was too far left? His (school and employment) history, his voting record at the state and national levels, the bills he supported, his answers (or sidestepping/filibustering) to questions asked of him...black and white (and remember Obama is both) had nothing to do with my vote. I'm opposed to illegal immigration! But if you want to come to America legally, you and your fellow countrymen/women are welcome.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
8 Apr 10
hello hofferp, I noticed because his school actually stretches to asia, basically from Indonesia or something and somewhat connected also with islamic roots. but his trip to middle east was challenging, those guys in the middle are pretty much into they're world and so close minded and much fanatic. but one thing i like about your election is that the candidates were willing to concede defeat. unlike here, there had to be many types of suing here and there. Frankly, there's too many of my people there in your country congesting as if they're not aware that US is having big financial troubles now, i don't want to be part of the BURDEN. I Love my country, Hofferp. if my country becomes better like singapore and other asian countries, no doubt people would start coming home. anything else you wanna share with me..
@hofferp (4739)
• United States
8 Apr 10
Nope, I've shared just about everything...
@irisheyes (4373)
• United States
9 Apr 10
I voted for Barack Obama and I'm still convinced I voted for the right man. My country has weathered and moved past the worst financial crises since the Great Depression and he has kept his campaign promise to institute unniversal healthare. There have been some serious compromises to get the bill passed but he has still done what many other leaders tried to to and failed. Teddy Roosevelt, Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton all attempted major healthcare reform in this country and now Preident Obama has succeeded. Right now, the Standard & Poor index is up by 74% and the dollar is 10% stronger. If things continue, President Obama will get a second term and i'll be more than happy to bote for him a second time.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Apr 10
Rock on! You made the right choice. I remember an interview with Matt Damon talking about McCain. He said, if you look at the actuary tables, there is a strong chance that we could have President Palin. Shudder!
@xfahctor (14128)
• Lancaster, New Hampshire
8 Apr 10
For me it came down to a hair splitting decision between Bob Barr(libertarian party) and Chuck Baldwin (constitution party). In the end I chose Baldwin. Both of these men to me represented what our founders envisioned and our constitution. I felt neither the democratic nor the republican parties came even close to that any more so McCain and Obama were simply not people I was going to vote for. You mentioned debates. Our media here has a nasty habbit of exluding candiates such as I was supprting for and won't set up a debate that includes them allowing only the "big ticket" names. I had to watch a seperate deabte online for my guys that also included two other parties. And because our media has it's head so far up the asss of the two major parties here, most people here aren't even aware there are other chpices besides democrats and republicans...or if they do talk about them..they are considered "fringe" candidates.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
8 Apr 10
that sucks Xfhactor! i guess now i know where our MEDIA here in my country got the idea of being choosy with the candidate. but the difference is that they choose a candidate secretly and don't report other candidates events. it's like the media is also campaigning for a certain candidate. i am not stupid because others had noticed this as well, which was really disappointing, if the popular guy wins, i bet more people would look for jobs abroad and more discrimination remarks will come in the way too.
@laglen (19782)
• United States
8 Apr 10
You bring up some very good points. I look at a lot of things. Know that you will never find somebody who agrees 100% but you have to look at what are most important. Looking at their track record is a good idea, but keep open about new politicians. It is very important to keep emotion out of voting. don't want anymore illegal immigrants from my country? then, i suggest you need to help ME teach my people how to poke they're brains and tell them "that's not the right one, stupid lmao thats great! I love that statement. So true. I am glad that you are interested. If more people educated themselves, then you would hopefully get a better government. In the United States, I believe that we have a problem with people voting emotion.
• United States
8 Apr 10
I employed some strategy - I originally wanted Nader, but with all the drama, knew the green party wouldn't have enough votes to win, so I had to go with the democratic party. I originally voted for Hillary, but she lost so, when it came down to it, I voted for Obama. My goals when I vote are to pick anyone on the left or green party. I will never ever ever ever ever ever ever vote for a republican.
@hofferp (4739)
• United States
8 Apr 10
And that's why we're in the trouble we're in...the never ever ever ever ever ever attitudes without really looking at the the candidates, regardless of the party.
• United States
8 Apr 10
Like the GOP - the new party of "no", right? I will never vote for a republican, because their ethics differ so largely from mine. I am not just stubbornly not voting like they are.
@spalladino (17925)
• United States
9 Apr 10
Hoff, do you realize how many people were turned off by Palin and her hate campaign? I can't speak for the entire nation but down here in Florida...you know, that Republican state McCain COULD have won...we didn't trust that woman in second chair and questioned McCain's sanity for choosing her.
1 person likes this
@sid556 (31005)
• United States
9 Apr 10
All I will say is that I did NOT vote for who is in office now and prior to that I did NOT vote for Bush. I wonder what the government would do if we all just did not vote at all because to be honest none of the candidates that we are given a choice of are really acceptable. I think many people pick what they feel is the least of the 2 evils. I really haven't felt real passionate about any of them in a long long time. Has anyone really if they are to be honest?
• Philippines
9 Apr 10
Hello there sid, well, as for me at least can be really not be a good factor for me. for the first time i am seeing the best candidate for this coming election. trouble is that people are too emotional and doesn't use they're brains to choose the leader.. this one candidate is frank and due honest.
@sid556 (31005)
• United States
10 Apr 10
Hi letran, Well, I'm glad that you guys in the Philipines have found someone that you can trust and feel comfortable with. I am in the States and it's been a while since we've been so lucky.
@nzinky (822)
• United States
10 Apr 10
I listened to all the debates and I also watched closely to what they said, the for the first time in my life I voted to John McCain and Sarah Palin cause I knew that the way Obama was speaking he was going to make government over into something no one wanted....... He doesn't have the good of the people in sight he's only one that has been a me president....It's all what he wants and to hell with what is good for the country. If we aren't careful the next president is going to have a hard time fixing all this crap he has put into law...... Like all Nevadaians feels like the only thing he has done is ruin our economy..... Cause he told people not to come here and they listened then he made a a--hole out of hisself when he got on stage and yelled I love Las Vegas......He's full of it and we in Nevada know it..... Until people start listening and not voting for the party instead of the best person for the job.....Or because the want to make history we are in trouble...... He didn't get elected because he got in because he was black and the stupid people voted him in office...
• United States
10 Apr 10
Are you sure you listened to all the debates? Sarah Palin can't even pick up a book. A lot of people are opposing Obama because of getting access to healthcare for all American citizens. You do realize that Palin, herself, used to sneak across the border to Canada for healthcare. That should speak volumes, particularly to someone who listens closely to what the candidates say.
• United States
9 Apr 10
I was only 16 in our last presidential election, so I couldn't vote, I THINK that if I could have, I would have either voted Ron Paul or McCain. (I think I would have gone Ron Paul, but if I were allowed to vote, I probably would have more seriously considered McCain.) I agree, there is indeed too much emotion in politics, some I think is ok. Sometimes a politician really does represent hope when you think he can help bring your country out of a huge pit. But not researching who he is can be a very very bad mistake. One that has cost us dearly. I don't think race had too much to do with it for me in the last election except for the constant eye rolling towards people who thought he represented hope simply because he was black (referring to Barack Obama)His support of the Stimulous, Short experience time in Senate, (it was less than a year I thinks. And it should REALLY say sometimes about his district when his seat was almost sold.) His stances on some issues (Girls shouldn't be exempt from a draft, Pro Abortion, etc.) These are what put me off of him. That and mass fanatical support. I was seriously considering Ron Paul, because a very hefty chunk of his funding came from individual Americans, and if I remember correctly he had the most monetary support from the different military branches compared to other politicians running. And pretty much all his views went with mine. I even found his stance on Abortion to be very ... diplomatic. Allowing each state to decide for itself. McCain... I honestly wouldn't have voted for him if it weren't for Palin. And the more I am learning about Palin, the more I question that stance. I like what she seemed to be originally representing during the race. For example I felt I could relate to her religious stances. But recently I am wondering if she has "sold out" from those points of view. Meaning if she runs in 2012, there is a very very distinct chance I won't vote for her... I think I am glad I didn't get to vote McCain/Palin. In hind sight, I think I would have let emotion towards Religious beliefs sway me a little too far. I think Ron Paul would have been the right choice, I hope that is who I would have chosen. Not that it matters. Hopefully I will learn better by 2012. Looking forward to this year though. I get to vote for my district representative. (and the Bozo who is serving as my congressional Representative won't be serving another term as my congressional Representative if I have anything to say about it.) Though as of yet, the choices don't look to appealing. I don't mind voting for someone who isn't technically running though :P Vote for the guy who you think represents you and has the best ability for the job, even if he doesn't really have a chance of winning, right?
• United States
10 Apr 10
I would just like to offer that Obama has ten years in public office (8 years in the Illinois senate and two years in the US Senate), which is more time than Hillary Clinton or John Edwards served. He actually served more time in public office than President Lincoln.
@hexeduser22 (5854)
• Philippines
28 Apr 10
I just want to say thank you for this discussion because I learned a lot from other people's inputs.