undercover detectives just left

Grand Junction, Colorado
September 27, 2010 8:01pm CST
So about 2 weeks ago in the middle of home schooling my daughter we heard a women yelling. A few minutes later said women ran into my apt. I had my door open as I often due when the weather is nice. I was completely startled as she didn't knock just ran in yelling "Call 911, a man just came in my apt with a gun." So I call 911 from my cell and have to get re-routed. I tell the dispatcher what the women said she asks a bunch of questions which I then ask the women and the relay begins. The dispatcher wanted to know if she knew the man? What's his name? How do you know him? and a bunch more questions. Now I don't knw this lady, as I really don't know most of my neighbors, just not interested to know most of them. This is not the best neighborhood, nor the worst, just a lot of people that I have no desire to associate with. So anyways the cops show up in about 7 mins, she leaves and goes and talks to them. They ask her questions and then they proceed to surround the apt, guns drawn, afterall there was a report of a man with a gun. No man is found in the apt she was in. The police leave. They never came and spke to me, not that I knew anything anyways, as I said I don't know her and the only thing I know is what she told me while relaying to the dispatcher. So all goes back to normal. Until an hour ago when there is a knock at my door, I open it and my teenager is standing there comes through the door and says the police are here they want to talk to you. WHY? What's going on? So 2 officers in plain clothes are there and ask to come inside, I say yes ad then look closer and ask to see identification as I can see their carrying weapons, but they don't look like cops to me. So they pull out badges and I let the 2 in and the one starts asking me questions. I now feel intimidated. "Is anyone else here?" NO, just me and my 2 daughters. The other officer wants to know if he can look around? "OK." "Are you sure no one else is here," "Yes I'm sure." "Have you seen this man?" "No." "Are you sure?" "Yes." Anyways they say the name and it sounds vaguely familiar, I then realize it has to do with the incident 2 weeks ago except name slightly different. So there is a felon running around on parole with a weapon, who has failed to register and is a 2nd striker. Looking at the picture of this man you wouldn't really think to much, nice looking clean cut. So my afternoon was interupted and for a few minutes I was made to feel almost like the criminal. Like I was hiding something. Now that it's all over and I can relax a bit, I was thinking, they didn't have a warrant, however I had invited them in. If I had said no you can't look around what might of happened? I had nothing to hide, but yet I feel somehow violated? Does that make sense? How would you have handled things?
8 people like this
16 responses
@fwidman (11515)
• United States
28 Sep 10
I would have done what you did. If there is nothing to hide, let them look. Worst they could do to me is leave with the impression that they don't like the way I keep house I hope they catch this guy before he harms someone. In the meantime, nice weather or not, keep your doors closed
2 people like this
• Grand Junction, Colorado
28 Sep 10
Yes door is staying shut and locked as my wallet was stolen out of my apt last week. I figured that since I had nothing to hide no reason they couldn't look around, just after they left I some how felt violated in a way. Plus I wasn't expecting company and had just gotten home, had left in a hurry this morning so the place wasn't picked up. I was somewhat embarrassed and apoligized for the mess. i.e. load of laundry on the couch towels that need folded and the piles of folded laundry that needed to be put away, lol. That sorta thing. I'm sure they see worse but I hate when my house isn't in order when people come by.
2 people like this
@fwidman (11515)
• United States
28 Sep 10
The last time the police came to visit me I only told them to watch their step, it's dangerous inside my house I had computer cases and parts and books strewn everywhere. Since I lived alone at the time it didn't bother me any. Never thought about someone coming inside as I don't ever get company Yes, I am certain they have seen a lot worse than either your house or mine. At least I would hope so! (Mine, not yours)
1 person likes this
• Grand Junction, Colorado
28 Sep 10
Well we have tons of books all over the livingroom also as I'm home schooling my 7 yr old this year. So it was a mess in the sense of clutter just needing to be put away. Thankfully no dirty dishes or piles of dirty laundry. Well except in the girls room the teenager has a pile on the floor to wash, but I won't feel embarrassed for her mess. My bed wasn't made up. UGH!!! I know they see worse just from watching cop shows on tv. I'm sure that neither of our homes even compare to that. Well I hope it's the end of it for them to return and certainly hope they catch the guy quickly. We really don't need armed felons runnin the streets around here.
1 person likes this
@carolbee (16241)
• United States
28 Sep 10
After I was shown their badges, I would have let them in also. I believe they were just doing their job and making certain nobody was in your home hiding. The initial call was made from your phone so they had to investigate your property. I don't really believe they were targeting you personally.
1 person likes this
• Grand Junction, Colorado
28 Sep 10
Just seems that when the original call as made tha theyould have come and asked me questions then, but they didn't. Not that I knew anything only what she had said. Her story never made complete sense, she seemed to be on something. Whether she was or not I have no idea. I guess this is why I choose to not interact with my neighbors.
1 person likes this
• United States
29 Sep 10
Carolbee, I think that you have a good point that the initial call was made from Beanie's phone, so they needed to follow-up on that. However, I also agree with Beanie that it is very strange the police did not investigate and talk with her the day the incident happened. Initially, I wondered whether or not they knew exactly where the call came from and maybe it took two weeks to get the number and address where the call had been placed from, but with caller ID and instant access to information these days, that theory really does not make sense. They should have been able to pinpoint the apartment that the phone call was made from before they even got to the apartment complex.
@carolbee (16241)
• United States
29 Sep 10
The police know right away where the call is coming from meaning the exact phone number. It is odd they waited 2 weeks to follow up unless the department was overwhelmed with other calls and put it on the back burner. Like it wasn't a top priority since it was investigated at the time it happened and nobody with a weapon was found.
1 person likes this
• United States
28 Sep 10
Pretty scary, huh? I can imagine what you were feeling at the time. They can be pretty intimidating but that is their job. They can't have little wimpy guys on the force, lol! I agree with everyone here and my first impression of them checking out your apartment was to make sure he wasn't hiding. Not that you were hiding him, but in case he was threatening you into saying no one was there. I think they did their job well and didn't take any chances on you being harmed in any way. It's good you let them in and they had a chance to look around. I don't think they were looking at you as a suspicious character, but as someone who was possibly being threatened as you made the phone call. When this woman came to you in your apartment, why didn't she make the phone call from your phone, or did I misunderstand this part?
• United States
29 Sep 10
Kashmere - I read your response yesterday, but I didn't have time to respond before I had to go. I think it is pretty funny and rather cool that we responded within seconds of each other and said similar things. Beanie - I would have been terrified if I were in your situation as well, especially with my children there. Still, I am glad that you opened the door to this woman, because it seems that these days people do not want to help out others. Instead, they will stand back and watch ... even video tape hideous events ... but do nothing to stop them. It makes my heart feel good to know that there are still people out there (other than myself) that are willing to help out, even if it means that they might put themselves and the people that they love in danger, because I would want someone to do the same thing for my loved ones if they needed it.
• Grand Junction, Colorado
29 Sep 10
@ PA Not that I wouldn't have answered the door, but my door was already open and she ran into my house, yelling to call 911, she had some blood running down her face. Which is probably why I felt so vulnerable.
1 person likes this
• United States
30 Sep 10
Oh yeah, I really did read that she ran in your open door in the original discussion, but apparently I had forgotten it by the time that I made this response. I think that the blood would have made it even scarier. Do you know what happened to her and why she was bleeding ... not that it really matters, but I am just curious.
• United States
28 Sep 10
I most likely would have asked to see their identification before letting them inside my house or apartment, although since they had weapons visible, if they were not really who they said they were, then I really couldn't have stopped them from coming inside if they wanted to be there. Still, it is better to ask for the verification. I think that what many have said is probably true - they wanted to make sure that the guy wasn't hiding out in your apartment. What others have not said, and perhaps not even realized, is that the officers didn't necessarily think that you were intentionally hiding this man. If he is considered "armed and dangerous", which he would be as he is a convicted felon with two strikes against him and they know he is armed, then he could be holding you hostage or something. They might have been doing it as much for your protection as anything, especially since the 911 call came from your apartment. The thing that would make me the angriest, though, is that it took two weeks to follow up on it, and if he had been forcing you to hide him that is an awful long time to be victimized.
1 person likes this
• United States
28 Sep 10
Hi purple! You basically said the same thing I did and I feel the same way. The only thing I thought of was maybe they heard he was in the area again and that's why they came back 2 weeks later to check things out. So scary, yikes!
1 person likes this
• Grand Junction, Colorado
28 Sep 10
That thought did cross my mind after they left and after I posted the discussion. Maybe they were just looking out for the safety of me and my family. I would like to think that was the reason and not that I was harboring a fugitive. I agree 2 week to come and talk to me the original police that came out here never came to my apartment and asked any questions. As I said before though I really didn't know anything but what she said when I was on the phone with the dispatcher, and her story never made complete sense. I still believe the women was on something. Hopefully their attempts to find him now will work out and he will be removed from the streets before he harms someone.
1 person likes this
• United States
29 Sep 10
Kashmere - I think that you might be right that they might have gotten a tip that he was in the area again, especially if Beanie's suspicions that this woman knew the guy are correct, and so they just wanted to make sure that everything was alright. Maybe they were concerned that the woman had gone their for help in the past, so they wanted to make sure that this guy was not retaliating or something. Beanie - I do hope that the police are able to find him before he harms anyone, too. I think that maybe the police didn't question you at the time of the initial incident, because they most likely realized that you were not involved and didn't have any further information. Still, I think that it would have been better if they had even just "dropped by" to let you know that they were there and had taken a report and given you their card in case you had any problems or learned any helpful information.
@celticeagle (119128)
• Boise, Idaho
28 Sep 10
I feel exactly the same way about my neighborhood. It is a low income complex and we have all kinds in and out of here in the about eight years we have lived here. I think that you did just what you should have done. I don't think the officers were violating you. I think they have thought this man may or may not be hiding in your apartment and it is their job to investigate and make sure you are safe. They obviously want to get this guy. I might feel alittle violated at first but after realizing what they were up against and what they were trying to do I would appreciate their efforts. I might even feel like I was guilty of something but we must understand the officers don't know you and they are just doing their job. Appreciate it for what it was and be sure to call the police if anything unordinary happens. This guy is looking for a place to hide and may or may not have known the woman. Be careful and be observant.
• Grand Junction, Colorado
28 Sep 10
I like the way you looked at what happened. It's true the police don't know me. They don't know if I might have been in trouble in my apartment, that maybe the guy said he may hurt us if I didn't tell them we were alone. Yes it does appear that they want to catch this guy. The apartments here are probably considered low income also, we staid here for so long as we had our daughter in private school, so we chose to stay here to afford a better school environment for our daughter. The women does know him and I just wonder if he was back at the complex today, may have to ask her the next time I see her. Thank you I will stay alert, and I do appreciate that the police are making attempts to catch this guy.
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (119128)
• Boise, Idaho
28 Sep 10
I would just try to work with them as much as possible and try not to feel too intimidated by them. They are just doing their jobs before something ugly happens.
@carmelanirel (20979)
• United States
28 Sep 10
You did the right thing because to deny them a chance to look around they'd only get suspicious of you. But you are also right in feeling violated, for their job is to get out of people information they normally wouldn't talk about. I do hope they catch this guy soon, he sounds dangerous and you have children to protect. I would even had said something to the officers, how can you protect yourself and your family since this guy is running around loose..
• Grand Junction, Colorado
28 Sep 10
True, I wouldn't want them to get the idea that I was hiding anything. I do feel I did the right thing, just don't like the way they a made me feel in doing the right thing. I also hope that they catch him quickly, but since the incident happened 2 weeks ago and he is still running around doesn't look good, he could be anywhere. As for protecting me and my family we are just keeping the front door locked and not opening the windows. Not a problem this week it's in the 100's here for the next few days. So we need air conditioning morning, noon and night.
2 people like this
• United States
28 Sep 10
I agree that denying them a chance to look around would seem suspicious, and they would have probably given you a much harder time and been even more intimidating than they already were to you. However, I also agree that I would have felt violated by the whole thing as well. Asking them how to protect yourself and your family is a good idea, though, especially since you already know that it takes at least seven minutes for them to get there after you dial 911 - that seven minutes might sound short, but it can seem like a very long time when your life is in jeopardy, as you most likely realize.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60895)
• United States
28 Sep 10
Well, the fact that you said they could look around says to them you have nothing to hide, if you did, then they would wonder what you are hiding. Police can be reassuring or not as they feel like it. I suspect that they were talking to everyone in the building half expecting one of them to be sheltering the man. Since you don't really know any of your neighbors, you can't ask them if they had the same thing happen without seeming nosy, tho if you ran into one you could do a mild outrage about it and see if they talked to them too. I suspect that they were mostly interested in those people who were home at the time, as you were, and if you had told them that you had been the one to call 911 for the lady, they might've been easier on you because the woman had already talked to them, and they would pretty much have the 7 minutes connected from the time of the call until they showed up accounted for.
1 person likes this
• Grand Junction, Colorado
28 Sep 10
Well they weren't very reassuring. The only other apt they went to was the one around the corner whre the women is now staying. She doesn't actually "live here" as she was only staying at one apt, that person kicked her out the night of the incident and she is now staying in another apartment. So just the 2 apts were questioned and searched. Mine apparently for being a good citizen and calling 911 and her for associating with the felon. Since none of my other neighbors were at home during the time of the original incident, although they wouldn't know that, unless they asked them none were questioned this afternoon. I hope the whole thing is over for me. They left a flyer with all of the persons information, and pics of him and his tattoos. When they left they asked me to call them if I saw him around, I would remain anonymous.
1 person likes this
@xstitcher (12162)
• Petaluma, California
22 Feb 16
Like @fwidman said, if you had nothing to hide and you had found out they were legit, let them look. Yipes--like being in an episode of Law and Order or something...
1 person likes this
@JenInTN (27565)
• United States
29 Sep 10
If you had said no..they may have just called in and got a warrent. They would have also probably thought you had something to hide. I would have been very uncomfortable too. Some policemen are hardened to people and don't really consider how they make you feel. They are so used to dealing with bad guys that they just treat everyone like that if there is an issue. I hope thye catch that guy. Hey...you better keep that door locked..at least the screen door.
• United States
29 Sep 10
I don't know whether or not they would have had enough "probably cause" to get a warrant, but I agree that making them get one would not have been the best course of action. If they had to take the time to get one, then they probably would have been a lot worse, and I have heard of police "searching" a place and leaving it in shambles afterward, which is most likely what would have happened if she did not cooperate. I think letting them do what they need to do, even if it is uncomfortable, is the best way to go, especially if you have nothing to hide.
• Grand Junction, Colorado
29 Sep 10
I agree that I doubt they would have been able to get a warrant. The fact that I let them in I saw no real valid reason to not let them have a look around, since I knew they wouldn't find anything. I just think that the police in this area automatically look down on people in this neighborhood as less than desirable. I could be wrong, but it's just the feeling I get. I always think that if I was in a different location would they behave differently. I really just didn't want my youngest to see the police behave aggressively with me and become afraid. I have taught her that the police are people that can be trusted and help those in need. She didn't seem to think anything about the behavior they displayed.
1 person likes this
@JenInTN (27565)
• United States
29 Sep 10
I used to teach my girls that the police were there to help and can be trusted too. I have not outright said any differeny but I have took it a step further and taught them now that they are a little older that policeman are just people too and that there are good people and bad people. I have actually been a bit torn from time to time as to what exactly to teach the girls about the police. The news says it all sometimes..now those are the questions that keep me on my toes with my girls.
1 person likes this
@saphrina (31739)
• South Africa
28 Sep 10
Here i won't open the gate for them, sweetie. If they have questions, they can ask it outside. I won't let them come into my house. Badges or not. Here we don't trust them at all. If they did their work in the first place, no one would have escaped from prison or a holding cell. I don't blame you for feeling violated. TATA.
• Grand Junction, Colorado
28 Sep 10
I'm glad that it's not the case for me. I have never felt that the police were corrupt, not saying that there aren't isolated incidents but I believe as a whole that they are good. Just didn't like being made to feel that I was in some was a criminal. I'm glad I cooperated with them though.
@saphrina (31739)
• South Africa
28 Sep 10
It's just the big difference in countries, sweetie. We have the most corrupt and useless police force here. At least you have a better one there.
• United States
29 Sep 10
I think that I have a rather naive view of the police, and I wish to keep it that way. I do know that there are some that are corrupt and feel that they are above the law, but that happens pretty much in any profession or in any group of people that you can name. Overall, though, I think that police officers are out to do good, even if their actions might not seem very nice at the time. Of course, as you said Saphy, that also depends upon where you are living ... not just the country but also the area, because there are some big cities that have been proven to have a very corrupt police force, and that taints even the "good" cops with a negative image.
@dawnald (84146)
• Shingle Springs, California
29 Sep 10
I would have done the same, let them in and answered questions, with heavy emphasis on "I just let her in to make the call and I don't know anything". But I wouldn't have appreciated their attitudes if they were acting like they thought I was hiding something...
• Grand Junction, Colorado
29 Sep 10
That's pretty much what I did. They seemed to believe that I don't know anything about this guy, just left a flyer with a lot of the persons info and pictures of him and asked that I call if I saw him around.
@carolscash (9500)
• United States
28 Sep 10
That is scary, but you done the right thing by letting them in to search around. I hope that they catch the guy. I would not allow my daughter out by herself either. Be sure to keep your doors locked as you never know who is around.
• Grand Junction, Colorado
28 Sep 10
Mydaughter is having a bit of a hard time with it, since she is actively looking for a job, her car was stolen a few months ago and she now is relying on the buses and lightrail again. I have asked her to put it off for a bit until we get on a rotine with the homeschool for the 7 yr old. Doors and windows ae remaining closed and locked.
@Thoroughrob (11750)
• United States
28 Sep 10
I would have handled it the way you did. I have nothing or no one to hide, but I would not appreciate being treated like a criminal.
• Grand Junction, Colorado
28 Sep 10
I see no reason why they couldn't have explained up front why they were there. Instead we are looking for a particular individual and just wanted to know if you have seen him. I figured out who they were looking for and wh they came to my apt. The reason for asking to come in I feel was just so that they could ask to have a look around. Or maybe by my letting them in gave them permission to look around regardless of my saying yes. I didn't feel that I had a choice in the matter either way. I don't like not having choices. Since I didn't have anything to hide I really didn't see any reason to not allow it. Just afterwards I started to feel that I was somehow violated.
@free_man (7337)
• United States
16 Dec 10
Hi Beaniefanatic. I would have done as you I would have asked to see some identification and asked what they were looking for. Then after I felt that they were really the law I would have let them in and let them look around. I would have felt out of sorts though because I would want to know exactly who or what they was looking for. I would feel violated too I would have told them this though and asked them to be more open as to what they was looking for and why was they at my home. I know how you feel about not really wanting to know your neighbors we don't hang out with any of our neighbors either. Like you said not the best but not the worst neighborhood. We was hanging out with some people till it started causing problems in our marriage, and the people we were hanging out with you couldn't talk about God or they would be all mad at us. So we stopped hanging out with any of them. Sorry this happened to you my friend! Hope things are much better now!
@drannhh (15240)
• United States
10 Oct 10
I probably would not have let them in, but maybe I would have stepped out to speak with them. Under these circumstances I would have been asking THEM some questions.
• Pamplona, Spain
2 Oct 10
Hiya beanie, How would I have handled it I would have felt just like you I´m afraid. Now I don´t bother with things I see and should report as they are only minor things but as you say they make you feel like the Criminal and not the others. What an amazing change of character these Police people have. More than once I have been made to feel like that. I would have asked for their identity too as I always do. I do not care if they are for real. You have a right to ask them they could easily be fakes just the same. I think that you reacted very well really as some would be freaking out as some People call it they would be very afraid. This is getting to be like in the Films and that is more scary than anything. Maybe the Police see too many of those Series that they make.