What happened to resspecting the country you were born in?

@dloveli (4369)
United States
November 25, 2011 6:44am CST
Seriously upset because Im starting to sound like my grandfather! What is the world coming to when people born and raised in the USA dont know the words to the National Anthem. On several embarassing ocassions people asked to publicly sing the Star Spangled Banner have forgotten the words. Wy is this happening? If you are asked to perform in public the VERY least you could do is memorize the song. When I was growing up my grampa would stand at attention even when listening to his transistor radio. Im not saying go that far but should you be prepared. At least pretend you respect your country. Am I wrong?
7 people like this
21 responses
@hvedra (1623)
25 Nov 11
I could probably manage the US anthem - I noticed when Christina Agualeria fluffed it - and I'm British! I think in her case it was just a simple nerves thing which can happen to a lot of performers even with their own songs they perform every night! Can't comment on some of the others. Apart from folks living out in cut off communities (like the Amish for example), I'm kind of wondering HOW they grow up avoiding knowing the anthem.
• United States
26 Nov 11
Great point hvedra. That's what I was going to say. Many performers actually change the wording of their songs, many times because they forget a word, or they purposefully change it, or perhaps (this gets to some musicians) something is played out of tune while they sing which throws them off. And then like a wide receiver in football who thinks of running for the touchdown before the ball comes and who drops the football as he's running, some musicians are thinking of that memorable-last-note-for-the-ages-that-people-will-talk-about-forever and all of a sudden are hit with dumbness. I doubt that most of the performers who seemed to forget the words, do not know the words to the song, especially one stanza. They've been asked to sing at a sporting event. They practice. So it has to be something other than them not knowing the song.
2 people like this
@dloveli (4369)
• United States
28 Nov 11
Okay i can buy that. However I dont think that when asked to play the national anthem anyon meant to change wording. I can see changing the melody or the way it is said to make it their own. I just think that the national anthem is off limits. They are role models whether they like it or not. What they do will be imitated. Its their obligation to the country whose citizens have made them what they are. I only hope that it's not too late for my country's history. More importantly have a knowledge of what the founders of their country went thru to allow them the luxury of being free to listen to certain music, wear the clothes of their choice, and express themselves in the manner of their choosing. I do think, however, you have a very valid point. thanks dl
@rog0322 (2834)
• Cagayan De Oro, Philippines
25 Nov 11
That's the signs of the times. I am a Filipino but I know well your "Ooh say can you see? By the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming... Whose broad stripes and bright stars..." You should be proud, it send shivers down my spine just reading the words. To tell you the truth, I always seek inspiration from the lines of your national anthem in times of my deepest trials, when I am down to my last peso, certain that tomorrow shall be coming and not knowing where to get the next meal for my family, it is like watching the bombs of despair raining down upon my self-respect, until I realize that hope is still around to see "that star-spangled banner yet wave, oe'r the land of the free and the home of the brave..." with the rising sun. I may be half a world away but I always feel the power of the song giving me the strength to carry on.
2 people like this
@dloveli (4369)
• United States
28 Nov 11
Friend may I say that is the most, sincere, honest, and kindest response I could have possibly asked for. I can tell you have a great heart and I dont even know you. I wish I could though. If only some americans could have half of the sentiment you do. The world could be so much better. Denise
• United States
25 Nov 11
No you most certainly are NOT wrong. I just wish there were more people around like your grandfather.
1 person likes this
@dloveli (4369)
• United States
28 Nov 11
Hey Whiteheather, I havent been on for quite some time but it seems that when ever I have had a heavy heart you have always been there with a kind, thoughtful word. Once again here you are. I wish EVERY american could have someone like you in their lives in form or another. Thanks again, Denise.
• United States
28 Nov 11
I have noticed you have not been around much on myLot now but I am glad to see you back. I check in almost every day but do not always respond. BTW I'm not sure if you know I am a Naturalized American this is my country of choice. I immigrated here 34 years ago and I am staunchly patriotic although I worked for the US Government for 12 years before I came here so I really feel I am now a true American.
• Philippines
25 Nov 11
I am not an American so I have no idea that this is happening in your country. But, i presumed that every American knows his national anthem because, all Americans are well schooled - considering that it is mandatory to finish at least high school. When in school, we are to sing the national anthem and recite the pledge of allegiance to our country everyday before classes are to start. And, there is an examination in our school which requires us to be able to write in full length the national anthem and pledge of allegiance. I can still remember that in a certain subject, we are to render a solo performance for the national anthem and the pledge of allegiance at the grade school level and also at the high school level. Is this not being imposed in your country, too? The department of education can do so much in order to make sure that evey American knows his/her national anthem and pledge of allegiance to the country of birth. You might as well do a suggestion to this effect through your mayor or governor or congressman, maybe.
@dloveli (4369)
• United States
28 Nov 11
I wish I could say that all the kind things you've said about us as Americans was true. Fortunately we all are given the same opportunities educationally. We are also in a democracy so it gives all of us freedom of choice. Which means not everybody indulges in the opportunities offered to them. What is ridiculous to me is the fact that celebrities asked to perform have ample enough time to at least learn the song. It's the total i dont care, its not that important attitude towards our countries history. It was American that gave them the opportunity to be famous! Thanks for your kind words.
@celticeagle (121039)
• Boise, Idaho
26 Nov 11
My grandmother taught me the National Athem and other patriotic things. Young people are not being taught much of anything. No, you aren't wrong. People should respect their country. It is sad to see what is falling by the wayside. If history repeats itself maybe multi-generational family living will repeat itself too.
@GardenGerty (105408)
• United States
26 Nov 11
It is amazing how people would freeze and forget the words of the National Anthem. If I was in the position of singing it, I still would probably make a crib sheet so that under pressure I would not go blank. I do not think that we sing it often enough at school or for special occasions and people just are not familiar with the song as they should be. Thhey may think of the performance but not the meaning of the words.
1 person likes this
25 Nov 11
i agree with you, the young generation is now no longer have respect to their own country because they never know how hard to get declaration of independence in the past. we're in this modern era wich is to easy to get what we want in our life, we dont know how hard to survive in the world war like our grandpa, i think the older generation have a higher sense of nationalism because they feel how hard to get declaration of independence in the past.
1 person likes this
@sid556 (31003)
• United States
29 Nov 11
No you aren't wrong at all. If you are in a position where you are asked to sing it publicly then you should at least take the time to know the words. If you are taken off guard and you don't know the words...decline and let someone who does sing it. I remember learning it in Kindergarten. Do they still teach it in schools like they used to? I know they stopped the Pledge of Allegance because of the word God.
@sid556 (31003)
• United States
28 Jan 12
I just did a similar discussion but for different reasons. In the two examples that I showed, both artists did have the words down, I believe. But notice in the background at how very many do NOT stand to attention.
@sid556 (31003)
• United States
28 Jan 12
oops...forgot to give you a link... http://www.mylot.com/w/discussions/2624958.aspx
@dorannmwin (36698)
• United States
29 Nov 11
You are absolutely right. The Star Spangled Banner is a very important part of who we are as a nation and it is a song that each and every one of us should know. On the one hand, I can understand that people do make mistakes and might get nervous when singing, but for professional performers, I think this is unacceptible. However, I have to say that what bothers me the most is the fact that my daughter is in third grade now and doesn't even know that Pledge of Allegiance.
@deliar (609)
• Indonesia
27 Nov 11
i think, they have no love to their country, till make them forget about the national anthem. in my country, every school always do ceremonial flag and every student should sing the national anthem, it can raise hte nationality for each student they will remember it till they grew up and. i think respecting in our country is really necessary.
@sminut13 (1786)
• Singapore
27 Nov 11
my husband and i were recently discussing a similar topic, where we needed to recognise our country's national anthem song. but in my case the situation is a little different. born in another country, but with no citizenship due to situation, i have been living in my birth country but my home country is another place. i only go there once every 3 years but personally, it's like going on a holiday rather than going home as it's all very new or rather i'm unused to what i'm used to...hehe thus, there's never been much moment when i have to sing the national anthem of my home country. and what's more, the national anthem was changed because the government changed from monarchy to democracy so the national anthem was totally different. and thus, i don't know the words to the new national anthem song and it's hard to memorize when you can't even understand properly the words themselves. but if you tell me to sing the song of my birth country, then yes, i know the words and the national anthem. i respect my home country and i'm still trying to learn the national anthem, hopefully, i'll be able to learn and sing it as well. we should respect our country that's true, but yes there are some people even here in my birth country who do no know the national anthem of their own country.
• United States
26 Nov 11
Hi Dloveli, I respect my country, but I don't know the words to the National Anthem. I know some of the words, but I could not sing it word for word. I think for many who are asked to sing it, they learn it, but then due to anxiety, they forget the words. I see that sometimes .. in fact someone was just on the news for forgetting the words to a song. If you are singing in front of millions of people and on TV, a case of the nerves can take over and you go totally blank. I used to be a public speaker, and I had to have little index cards to keep me on track because my mind would go blank due to anxiety.
@Lakota12 (42681)
• United States
26 Nov 11
onpe your not wrong and where I live I can hear the pa system att he school and when they say the pledge and I hear it I stop put hand over heart and say it witth them also I know where the flag is even if I cant see it from my house I face it
@cerebellum (3871)
• United States
26 Nov 11
I agree with you. When I watched the superbowl and the singer messed up, I thought I heard her wrong till I heard them talking about it. It seems that after 9/11 everyone was patriotic and I thought (wishfull thinking) that it might stay that way. I think the younger generation hasn't had to go thru anything hard, and they aren't really taught to be patriotic. I don't even think they have the pledge of allegiance in schools anymore because it says something about God and they want to keep the seperation of church and state. I have also heard that some people want to change the national anthem because it says something about bombs. I don't like or agree with most wars, but it seems we are always at war, so a song about war kind of suits us.
@alottodo (3061)
• Australia
26 Nov 11
I have lived out of my country for a very long time but I would never forget my National Anthem! no way I'm to proud of it! I even learnt my new country National Anthem and I Am proud to say I know the song better than a lot of young people in this country.
@ardieboi (195)
• Philippines
26 Nov 11
It happens you know. I'm not from America but in our country that also a happens a lot as well. It's like you memorize the song already but in the middle oft he song if you try to remember the words by thought and by heart you tend to forget the lyrics. It happens.
• Philippines
26 Nov 11
I fully agree with you dloveli. I am a naturalized US citizen and I know all the lyrics of The Star Spangled Banner by heart. The reason for that is each morning, before I start with my chores and after I thank God for today, yesterday and tomorrow, I play the national anthems of the US and of my country of birth. I am heartily grateful for all the things that my countries have done for me, the lessons I've learned, the countless opportunities, the freedom and independence that I enjoy, and lot more, too many to mention. God bless you and our countries, my friend
• India
26 Nov 11
This is quite bad.People should definitely remember their national anthem.I am from India, and even though our National Anthem, is in Bengali, I will be able to recite it, correctly, even though I may not be able to understand many of the sentences. As a matter of fact, I am 53 years old, and even now, I get tears in my eyes, whenever, I hear the national anthem,sung during the Independence day and the Republic day.
• Canada
26 Nov 11
O Canada Our home in native land True patriot love In all thy sons command With glowing hearts we see thee rise The true North Strong And Free From far and wide, O Canada We stand on guard for thee God keep our land Glorious and free O Canada We stand on guard for thee O Canada we stand on guard for thee. See? I know all the words to my National Anthem! :) Want to hear me sing it in FRENCH too? We had to learn both in school, and it stuck with me. I didn't have to try too hard to remember the words. I was actually listening to Vice Vukov singing in Croatian in the background, and trying to understand the words, and even while deeply concentrating on something else, I could still recall the words to my National Anthem as easily as I can recall my own name!!!!
@_sketch_ (5709)
• United States
25 Nov 11
The national anthem is about war. I am opposed to war, so I do not like the song. The song is not my country. I can have respect for my country without being in love with the song that someone else had chosen long before I was born. I agree with you in that it is ridiculous that a performer would forget the words, but maybe they are just nervous. A lot of times, those who are asked to sing the song are not used to being in front of a large crowd, so it's understandable that some may be anxious. If someone forgets some words to a song, it doesn't mean that they don't respect their country. Honestly, I think that this is a bit of an overreaction.