What's in a name?

@AmbiePam (48681)
United States
March 13, 2018 6:13pm CST
I don't know if you can tell from my past posts, but I'm proud of my parents. I was thinking the other day about a situation that really impressed me when I heard the story. So, my dad is one of 16 children (no twins, & one died right before turning 2). They were hard workers to an extent I cannot describe. I'm the mid 1970s when my dad went to college he needed to get a job close to his school. He got a Pell grant, and a part scholarship, but he had no other way to pay. Since two of his other brothers had worked for Wonder Bread, he decided he'd apply at the same facility. So when he called to set up an interview they asked his name. He told them. The person doing the hiring said, "Wait, I recognize that last name. Are you the brother of Larry and Albert?" My dad confirmed he was, and the guy told him there was no need for an interview. If he was their brother he knew he'd be getting a hard worker. He gave him the day and time of the first day they expected him. I just think that says a lot. That someone need only know your last name, what kind of family you come from, and it's good enough to land a job. I never wanted to do anything to sully my parent's name. What's funny is when I went to college I got a phone call from a woman who I knew of, but had never met. She and her husband had attended the same church as my parents for awhile. The woman heard I was starting college early (at 16), and her own daughter was due to start college that fall. Keep in mind, I had never met any of them. But the woman wanted to know if I would be her daughter's roommate in the dorms because she really needed her to room with someone who would be a good influence on her. I thought that was so funny. I guess she assumed any child of my parents would turn out to be a good influence.
21 people like this
20 responses
@JudyEv (121533)
• Bunbury, Australia
14 Mar
You have every reason to be proud of your parents and I can understand how you would never want to do anything to spoil their good name.
3 people like this
@AmbiePam (48681)
• United States
14 Mar
Yes. I just can't put into words how much I admire them. I can at least rest assured when my mom left this earth she knew without a doubt, how I felt about her.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (121533)
• Bunbury, Australia
14 Mar
@AmbiePam It is really something to have no regrets when you lose a parent - to be happy that you said when you wanted to say and didn't just think it and keep it to yourself.
3 people like this
@GardenGerty (98217)
• United States
14 Mar
How great. A little bit of the opposite happened in my life. My first husband was one of five boys. We bought a car before getting married and needed to insure it. My dad called his insurance agent and said I was marrying one of the H_________ boys. Last name omitted you might have met the family in Spencer. The agent asked "which one" and said if it was B_________ he would not insure us, cause he had too many tickets.
2 people like this
@AmbiePam (48681)
• United States
14 Mar
Oh my word. That's pretty bad.
@Tampa_girl7 (25400)
• United States
18 Mar
You are truly blessed that your family was so well thought of
2 people like this
@Hannihar (33162)
30 Mar
@AmbiePam So how did it work out being roommates with the girl? Yes if a name has a good reputation then the person applying for a job or something else will get the job possibly.
1 person likes this
@AmbiePam (48681)
• United States
30 Mar
I didn't room with her. The college paired people up without anyone's input.
1 person likes this
@Hannihar (33162)
1 Apr
@AmbiePam I see.
• Midland, Michigan
30 Mar
My parent's instilled in us a good work ethic, but my dad was brought up thirty miles away and the name wasn't that common back then. My mom was brought up in a big family and many in town know them, but we didn't tell people we were related to that side of the family when we were still growing up. I think that more of the kids of the baby boomers probably had better work ethics than many kids do these days and that may be mainly due to the fact that most moms back then stayed at home to raise their kids. Kids can still be trained if both parent's work outside the home, but the training has to start early and many don't think about it until it's too late. It's great that so many people had high regard for your family name.
1 person likes this
@AmbiePam (48681)
• United States
30 Mar
I think you are right about the work ethic. And things were harder then, and I think each generation wants better for their kids. But better doesn't mean let people do what they want when they want. As each generation comes along, it feels like I'm general, less effort is given. But maybe that's just me.
1 person likes this
• Midland, Michigan
3 Apr
@AmbiePam some patents try to be less strict than how they were raised which can backfire and you find out too late. If parents try to do the best they can that's all that matters and it's hard to know looking from the outside in.
1 person likes this
@moffittjc (42215)
• Gainesville, Florida
18 Mar
Wow, that is a great story! You should be very proud of your family and their strong work ethic. I have always believed in having a strong work ethic, and it is something I am trying to instill in my kids. I work at a municipal parks and recreation department, and my daughter applied to be a summer camp counselor at the city I work out (I work in a different division). One of my co-workers saw her application and came and told me she was going to hire her, because if she was half the worker I was, she'd be getting a great employee. I told her my daughter would work even harder than I do! (I hope I was telling the truth...this will be my daughter's first job)
1 person likes this
@AmbiePam (48681)
• United States
19 Mar
That's so cool! She should feel pretty proud about that.
1 person likes this
@moffittjc (42215)
• Gainesville, Florida
19 Mar
@AmbiePam She's pretty humble, but I am pretty proud of that! haha
1 person likes this
@toniganzon (49185)
• Philippines
14 Mar
I know exactly what you mean. I love my parents as well and I've been keeping trying to keep our family name's reputation for so long. Everywhere I go, people would recognise my family name and would remember my father and my father's family. One thing I have to keep up with are the expectations.
1 person likes this
@AmbiePam (48681)
• United States
14 Mar
That's wonderful.
2 people like this
@mydanods (6761)
• Nigeria
14 Mar
@AmbiePam Very wonderful.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (37666)
• United States
21 Mar
Well that certainly was a testimonial to your parents and to you.
1 person likes this
@AmbiePam (48681)
• United States
21 Mar
I wish I could make my parents as proud as they made/make me. The good thing (one of the good things) about my late mom is that she was always proud of me, no matter what.
1 person likes this
@jstory07 (66168)
• Roseburg, Oregon
18 Mar
People usually assume if your parents were good people than you were good to,
1 person likes this
@AmbiePam (48681)
• United States
18 Mar
Boy is that not true for my mom's brother! Unfortunately.
1 person likes this
@katsmeow1213 (29047)
• United States
14 Mar
I have no doubt you are a very good influence... from what I know you are a deeply kind person! Did I tell you the story about my 11 year old in the church play? He was going against an older, more experienced girl for a particular part. This girl has done acting classes most of her life, so I was trying to convince my son he might not get the part. He says to me "Yeah, she has more experience, but I'm a (insert our last name here)" In the end my son got the part! LOL
1 person likes this
@AmbiePam (48681)
• United States
16 Mar
@sol_cee (14386)
• Japan
14 Mar
So did you become roommates?
1 person likes this
@AmbiePam (48681)
• United States
14 Mar
No. I decided to live at home for awhile since I was just sixteen.
@Juliaacv (29682)
• Canada
14 Mar
That's a blessing to come from such well-respected stock. I can tell that you come from a good family, you are so respectful and loving. I know that my maiden name got my husband a job before we were married. And the name Julia Anne is so common in my family, with generations before me, its not just our last name that is well known, its my entire name!
1 person likes this
@AmbiePam (48681)
• United States
14 Mar
That's pretty cool!
1 person likes this
@bunnybon7 (35928)
• Holiday, Florida
18 Mar
it is funny since often people are not like their parents and many times surprisingly opposite . but i see what you are saying. you can also be judged by reputation . my first housekeeping job many yrs. ago i handed in 50 bucks found in a check out bathroom floor and my honesty got me a letter that got me almost any job i applied for after that . sometimes even if they did not need help right then.
1 person likes this
@FayeHazel (17164)
• United States
14 Mar
That is a huge family your dad comes from, you have a lot of aunts and uncles. Cool! What a great thing to be known for - your work ethic. And for you, that's an awesome compliment.
1 person likes this
@mlgen1037 (25456)
• Manila, Philippines
14 Mar
Yeah. Sometimes the name gives us the reputation of who and what we are. And the next generations had to keep up with the name, most especially if it had given a good impact to others.
1 person likes this
@snowy22315 (45666)
• United States
14 Mar
That is great. The family name must mean alot to you.
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (53539)
• United Kingdom
14 Mar
That's great that your name carried that good reputation.
1 person likes this
@TRBRocks420 (75785)
• Banks, Oregon
14 Mar
That's how my mom and, grandparents are people just know they are good.
1 person likes this
@peavey (16487)
• United States
14 Mar
Our family is so diverse neither one of those things would ever happen!
1 person likes this
@Deepizzaguy (12307)
• Lake Charles, Louisiana
13 Mar
That is a very good story that the good name of your family is reaping some great benefits.
1 person likes this