Browned off - a new phrase for you perhaps?

@JudyEv (264084)
Rockingham, Australia
January 14, 2022 4:06am CST
The photo has nothing to do with the post. Just a very wet kangaroo, probably browned off by the weather. There are not many Australians on myLot but I am one of several. I occasionally use phrases that people are not familiar with. Sometimes I know the word/phrase will be unfamiliar but I use it anyway thinking why should I change my natural way of writing. From time to time, I am surprised that what is a very common word to me will be unknown to others. ‘Chook’ is one, meaning a chicken or hen. Chook is very common in Australia but seems mostly unknown elsewhere. My latest offering was ‘browned off’. I did wonder if it would be unfamiliar and it seems it was. It means ‘fed up’ but I couldn’t find an explanation as to how it came into being. There is a belief that maybe it stems from fruit which, when left out and browned by the sun, is no longer so appealing, The term seems to date from around World War II and is most widely associated with the British forces. So, is it a new phrase to you?
32 people like this
30 responses
@Fleura (18452)
• United Kingdom
14 Jan
Chooks is definitely in common use here in the UK too. As for 'browned off' - it's a phrase that used to be in common use but isn't any more. It's a saying I remember from reading old story books when I was a child! Funny how language changes continually.
5 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
That's nice you know about 'chooks'. And as for 'browned off' @PhredWreck @Fleura, just because a few didn't know it, I'm assuming it's not well known. Maybe I'm barking up the wrong tree. Oops, sorry. Couldn't help myself.
3 people like this
@Fleura (18452)
• United Kingdom
14 Jan
@MALUSE The fruit sounds like a likely origin. And yes I have noticed how language has changed - even when reading through my own school exercise books!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
@MALUSE Thanks for the adding that. That's mostly where I got my information from.
1 person likes this
@PhredWreck (6095)
14 Jan
Perhaps new for many, but not for me. I've come across it a few times reading books.
5 people like this
@soymex (962)
• Bucharest, Romania
14 Jan
For me, there are many words that do not have an english translation, "sarmale" (minced meat wrapped in farce sheets and cooked with various spices), cartabosi (a kind of sausage, homemade) and many others that do not come to me now in mind!
2 people like this
@Fleura (18452)
• United Kingdom
14 Jan
What are farce sheets?
2 people like this
@soymex (962)
• Bucharest, Romania
14 Jan
@Fleura cabbage
2 people like this
@Fleura (18452)
• United Kingdom
14 Jan
@soymex Aha I see! I think I have eaten those when a Romanian friend here made them, but I didn't know their proper name.
1 person likes this
@flapiz (13496)
• United Kingdom
14 Jan
I've lived in Australia for 3 good years and this is the first time I've heard of browned off. Although I know what chook is. I love Aussie lingo and how McDonalds is Maccas and BBQ is barbie. And how afternoon is arvo. Sometimes I still use these terms and people would look at me weirdly.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
We do tend to shorten a lot of our words, that's for sure.
2 people like this
@flapiz (13496)
• United Kingdom
14 Jan
@JudyEv This discussion makes me miss the laid back Australian culture. And this time of year is summer too. OMG take me back.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
@flapiz Be careful what you wish for. It's going to get to the high 30Cs here today.
1 person likes this
@Marty1 (67229)
• Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
14 Jan
yes, the ones you mentioned are new to me. I love when i learn a new Australian term from you! Don't ever change the way you write, i love it! I don't write out words from the specific area of Pittsburgh which has all its own yinzer language
2 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
I'm sure there are lots of words and phrases that I wouldn't understand.
2 people like this
@Marty1 (67229)
• Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
14 Jan
@JudyEv I think it is just where we grew up, lived and the culture from all that which lets us know the different terms that people in own areas better than the rest of the world if that makes sense
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
@Marty1 That makes perfect sense. How are you feeling now, Jennifer?
@LadyDuck (375445)
• Switzerland
14 Jan
I never heard "browned off" and I never knew that chook is used referred to chickens or hens. Both are new for me, thank you Judy.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
I thought you might have remembered 'chook' from my posts here, not that it matters. Now, I usually put 'chook' then 'chicken' in brackets.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (375445)
• Switzerland
15 Jan
@JudyEv - Now that you mention this, I remember you wrote "chook" for chicken in the past.
1 person likes this
• Nairobi, Kenya
14 Jan
Yes it is a new phrase but I'm glad I've learned something new today including chook
2 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
'Chook' is a really old term here. 'Chicken' usually means a chick or baby chook. lol
1 person likes this
• Nairobi, Kenya
15 Jan
@JudyEv I will try to use it here so I can teach few more people in my place
1 person likes this
@cacay1 (67064)
• Cagayan De Oro, Philippines
14 Jan
We have here very famous chicken a la carte named CHOOCS TO GO.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
That's a great name. So 'chook' is known in the Philippines.
1 person likes this
@cacay1 (67064)
• Cagayan De Oro, Philippines
15 Jan
@JudyEv, yes because of that chicken a la carte. I like their chicken wings.
1 person likes this
@DocAndersen (55310)
• United States
14 Jan
i cannot say I've ever heard that - fun I think i am going to adopt it!
2 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
We say it as a matter of course so it's a bit of a surprise when someone says they've never heard it.
1 person likes this
@DocAndersen (55310)
• United States
15 Jan
@JudyEv i suspect I've heard it, just didn't register with a meaning!
1 person likes this
• China
14 Jan
It is a new phrase to me.I have learnt lots of phrases from your posts.Some are your local ones,for example the "crash-hot".
2 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
Idioms can be very puzzling at times. It's probably the hardest part of learning a new language.
1 person likes this
• China
15 Jan
@JudyEv So.right! However I am very interested in them.just as I do in Chinese idioms.
1 person likes this
@BarBaraPrz (34726)
• St. Catharines, Ontario
14 Jan
Not new to me. In fact, it's old. I haven't heard anyone use it in ages. I came across "chook" in one of the Royal Spyness books. Continue to use your idioms, that's what makes the 'Lot so interesting. I recently confused someone with "dropping like flies".
2 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
I remember you using 'dropping like flies'. It all expands our minds and vocab so it's all good.
1 person likes this
@LindaOHio (82254)
• United States
14 Jan
Yes it's new to me. Thanks for the explanation. Chook is new as well.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
A 'chicken' to most Australians, certainly older ones, refers to the babies, not the adult hens.
1 person likes this
@marlina (137638)
• Canada
14 Jan
Not familiar with both of those words mentioned
2 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
I've learnt some new terms here too although Fiacre's long words I struggle to remember.
@Juliaacv (61598)
• Canada
14 Jan
It is a new phrase for me, but I was pretty sure what it meant when I read the title. That is a nice picture of the roo.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
It rained heavily most of the day and that roo just sat it out under the shelter of the shrub. Its joey was nearby under its own bush.
2 people like this
@rebelann (94213)
• El Paso, Texas
14 Jan
You're right, I've never heard that one before. I find it interesting to read about the different phrases used by different countries that also speak 'English' ..... I wish I were still interested in traveling but that's a ship that sailed a long time ago.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
I sometimes wonder if we'll ever travel again. We may not even get to the other side of the country.
1 person likes this
@rebelann (94213)
• El Paso, Texas
15 Jan
I hope you will. Now that you don't have such a large home to care for you could probably spend half your time on the road.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
15 Jan
@rebelann Worry about contracting covid would keep us at home.
1 person likes this
@RubyHawk (49919)
• Atlanta, Georgia
14 Jan
Both phrases are new to me. I use some words and phrases that others don’t understand. I grew up in the lower Appalachians. Long ago people there were isolated and spoke differently than everyday language. Of course times have changed but some words and phrases linger.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
Until covid, everyone (well, most anyway) were incredibly mobile and local colloquialisms mostly petered out.
1 person likes this
@RubyHawk (49919)
• Atlanta, Georgia
14 Jan
@JudyEv You don’t hear much of it here now. It’s been educated out of the younger generation.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
15 Jan
@RubyHawk Yes, I can believe that.
1 person likes this
@allknowing (103016)
• India
15 Jan
I would rather go for something that everyone understands. There are so many phrases that are understood by most. and 'browned off' has as many as 86 synonyms
https://rb.gy/iuopnb
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
15 Jan
In some ways I agree, but I don't want to feel I have to become pseudo-American or pseudo-Indian or pseudo-anything else just so people here can understand me. And half the time I'm surprised by their not knowing something that, to me, is commonplace. Nowadays, I try to write anything I think might be a problem first in my lingo (language) then in brackets after.
1 person likes this
@allknowing (103016)
• India
15 Jan
@JudyEv I can understand pronunciations being different but why should one use phrases that are not common when one can use those that are common. Talking about pronunciation when my niece arrived from Australia I just could not understand what her kids were saying as they were speaking the way an Australian would (lol)
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
15 Jan
@allknowing My problem has been, in some instances, that if a phrase is common to me, I have no idea that it isn't common to others. I had no idea that 'fortnight' wasn't a common term but some had never heard of it. I can understand the pronunciation being difficult but there is no right or wrong as regards that.
1 person likes this
@velvet53 (21610)
• Palisade, Colorado
15 Jan
These words are new to me and thank you for explaining them. I always like to learn new things and you have always been a big help.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
15 Jan
Thanks. Sometimes I'm surprised at all the differences but I guess I shouldn't be.
1 person likes this
@velvet53 (21610)
• Palisade, Colorado
15 Jan
@JudyEv Oh but those surprises can be wonderful.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
15 Jan
@just4him (261277)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
14 Jan
Yes, it is. Thank you for sharing it.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
14 Jan
I'm always surprised when something that is very familiar to me is unknown to others.
1 person likes this
@just4him (261277)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
15 Jan
@JudyEv We expect everyone to know what we do. That's the surprise when they don't.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
15 Jan
@just4him Yes, I guess so.
1 person likes this
@moffittjc (102701)
• Gainesville, Florida
15 Jan
Totally new phrase for me. But I love learning about different words or phrases from other countries, so keep them coming! I always find them totally interesting!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (264084)
• Rockingham, Australia
15 Jan
I still get surprised at what comes over as 'unknown'. Often I put a second term/meaning in brackets so I guess that helps a bit.
1 person likes this
@moffittjc (102701)
• Gainesville, Florida
16 Jan
@JudyEv It does help a lot.
1 person likes this