Would you cancel membership if a party changed?

@bayernfan (1430)
Canada
April 19, 2009 2:23pm CST
How important are a political party's policies and the issues that they focus on to you? Would it be enough to cause you to cancel your membership in a political party if they changed policy, decided to discontinue fighting for an issue or focused on areas outside of previously stated goals? Maybe you aren't a member of any party? Would you reconsider how you vote if a political party adjusted their views? Sometimes political leadership changes party policy after gaining power. Oftentimes adjustments to a party's approach to issues are made in order to appeal to different demographics. Are you bothered by such occurrences? Maybe membership or support of a new party is the solution?
1 person likes this
10 responses
@Taskr36 (13925)
• United States
19 Apr 09
Absolutely. I vote for who I think is best and I'm a member of the party that I feel best represents my views. If the party changes in a way that ceases to fit my views, I'll find another party that I like better. This election made me strongly consider changing to a libertarian. I'm not there yet, but it could happen.
1 person likes this
@bayernfan (1430)
• Canada
20 Apr 09
So are you registered as an independent? Has it always been that way or did Lou Dobbs help to convince you? What do you think about Ron Paul? Has Ron been responsible in any way for your consideration of Libertarianism?
@Taskr36 (13925)
• United States
20 Apr 09
I'm still registered as a Republican for now and I'm glad that I'm able to vote in the republican primaries. We'll see how the party does over the next year or so. My wife has been a registered democrat since she was 18 and changed to independent in 2008 so it's quite possible that I might do the same thing in 2010. I like Ron Paul, although I don't really agree with him much on foriegn policy or on education. I did read a lot about him since he had a good number of fans on mylot and I was impressed that he walks the walk. His record as a person and politician does not contain the hypocrisy and inconsistency that I see from most politicians. I'm not sure I'd want him as president necessarily, but I would like to see him holding an office with more clout than US Rep. He'd probably make a great governor of Texas.
@bayernfan (1430)
• Canada
23 Apr 09
Many politicians are notorious for not putting their money where their mouth is. Only taxpayers money. Ron Paul can't be accused of this. He is certainly unique. Do you consider Ron Paul an isolationist? Are you an interventionalist? Do you oppose Ron Paul's policy of nonintervention or is it the way he has voted on particular/specific foreign affairs issues that you take exception with? I am not overly familiar with Ron Paul's views on education. What about them do you disagree with? Is it his opposition to federal government regulation of the education system?
@owlwings (39611)
• Cambridge, England
19 Apr 09
I am not a member of a political party, nor ever have been nor ever will be. I have always voted (because I feel that my right to vote is too precious to be ignored) but I tend to vote for the person rather than for the party. It is true that the party that a person represents (and their policies) is an influence but much more important to me is that person's track record in representing the people who he or she is supposed to represent (in local or national politics). I don't want a figurehead or a ladder climber, I want someone who will listen to any issue I may have and will actually do something about it: if possible, I want to vote for someone who lives in the area he or she is representing and who is aware of and concerned with the local issues that concern me. This might be a candidate from any party ... the important thing would be how often I am likely to see him/her around my area after the election and how effective would he or she be in getting things done. Perhaps part of this thinking comes from the perception that there is very little to choose now (in the UK) between any of the parties. The only difference between them, it seems, is one of emphasis. Even with strongly disparate parties, however, it still seems to me that the most important thing about representative government is the 'representational' value of a candidate. His or her personal politics are really secondary. In other words, a candidate's job is to represent me (regardless of whether I voted for him/her or not). If they don't do that, then they don't get my vote.
1 person likes this
• China
20 Apr 09
i an not a member of a political party too. i vote,but god knows where my vote go. party government is considered to be the advanced politics. but there are so many demerits. a candidate or a party changes all the way. poeple don't like that ,but there is no substitute.
@bayernfan (1430)
• Canada
20 Apr 09
owlwings, I think that it is very important to consider the person running for election regardless of whether you are interested in party politics. All too often, citizens approach the voting process lightly and that is what enables figureheads, ladder climbers, opportunists or whatever you wish to call them to saturate politics. An ill informed vote is worse than not voting because it can cancel out a well informed vote even if unintended. How do you know if a candidate is willing or capable to advocate on your behalf if you don't learn anything about them? In the least, you would think that people would check records and test how truthful/trustworthy a candidate is. I also question the ability of carpetbaggers to understand the area and constituency that they wish to represent. Performance and ability to get things done is important. How affective is a candidate likely to be at solving the problems of a community that they are unaware of, have never experienced or don't understand? Do you want someone who is prepared or who needs help being brought up to speed? How long will that take? Patrolling their area is harder for politicians to do in Canada. Ridings tend to be very large and some populations can be dispersed throughout. Canada is the second largest country in the world by area, so I am assuming that things are much different for you in the U.K. judging by geography and your description. I would never vote for a candidate based on party affiliation alone. It's important to consider a candidate's attitude towards their party and party policies as well. How likely to vote for or against their party is a member of the house? How will that effect my interests? In our system there is a member called the party whip. He/She can be a powerful taskmaster. Also, in parliamentary democracy, a government can be removed from power when they lose confidence in the house. Voting for or against one's own party can be a significant decision. Check out the case of Chuck Cadman and the 2005 Canadian Federal Budget vote here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chuck_Cadman
@laglen (19782)
• United States
19 Apr 09
Ever since I turned 18, I have been a registered Republican. This past year I was getting more vocal and active and almost joined the RNC. But when they nominated McCain, I decided that they were far too liberal for me. I will continue to be registered as a Republican so that I can take part in the primaries, with that sad pathetic glimmer of hope that we will once again one day put up a Republican worth walking across the street for. We will see.
@bayernfan (1430)
• Canada
20 Apr 09
Was it just McCain or would any of the available candidates have been able to convince you? Perhaps you could have followed Romney, Huckabee or Thompson? All the main candidates seemed to me to be trying to be all things to all people. I didn't get the feeling that any of them were a true conservative leader. Only a few were fiscally conservative and some were socially liberal. I was more impressed with the lesser tiered candidates Tom Tancredo, Duncan Hunter and Ron Paul. They seemed to be the only ones willing to discuss conservative ideas and offer real solutions. What's your impression of RNC chairman Michael Steele and the direction he wants to take the Republican party? Would you ever consider joining a party other than the RNC? What if a better conservative option was available?
• United States
19 Apr 09
I dropped my party affiliation and became an Independent 10 years ago when I realized the both parties were being controlled by the extremes of each wing and that the politicians in Washington were doing what was in their self interest and not for the good of the nation as a whole.
@bayernfan (1430)
• Canada
23 Apr 09
The two parties have a stranglehold on the system. They know this full well, so they believe that they don't have to change. It will take a lot of effort, hard work, and courage by many Americans to change the dynamic. The fear over "wasting" one's vote must be overcome. Have you ever considered voting for another party or an independent candidate? What would get you motivated to do so? Unfortunately, it may take disaster before the majority of Americans wake up.
• United States
24 Apr 09
"Have you ever considered voting for another party or independent? What would get you motivated"Don't take this any other way then how I post it, I am motivated by someone I believe has at least an ounce of honesty. Something seriously lacking in most of our countries leadership (both parties). Those that exhibited any sense of honesty in this last election in my opinion were Mitt Romney, Joe Biden, Mike Huckabee and Ron Paul. Between the two parties and the MSM each of these candidates were branded a member of a cult, a stumbler and two middle of the road a religious crusader and simply a nut case. You fill in the names. The past administration made such a mess of things there should be no surprise with which wing is running the show. Depending on your current economic situation things are wonderful or speeding to hell in a roller coaster. Control is not in our hands and all we can do is go for the ride and make some educated decisions come 2010.
@bayernfan (1430)
• Canada
24 Apr 09
I appreciate you taking the time to converse with me. I can tell that you payed close attention to both presidential nomination races carefully. I too noticed attempts to label and marginalize certain candidates who wished to open up debate and actually discuss important issues. In the end, the majority of the few remaining candidates were essentially the same and fought over a small part of the field of play with nuance, semantics and hyperbole. All too often in politics, honesty is punished and deceit rewarded. I respectfully disagree with your final comment. While much is out of the hands of ordinary Americans, continuing to follow the same political patterns and hoping that things will be better in the future is a recipe for disaster. What reasons have Americans given their politicians and the media to change? You won't have to worry about John McCain in 2012. I haven't noticed much change in the RNC since his loss. I don't see a reason why Barack Obama won't be there. As far as 2010 goes, Americans have some time to observe performances. 2010 isn't that far off though, and U.S. debt is growing rapidly. How much longer can you survive the status quo?
• United States
19 Apr 09
Well I really do not believe in any party. Because I do not agree with any of htem completely. I am a independent. I think good and bad ideas can come from any of the parties and good and bad politicans can come from any of the parties. I think for myself on all the issues and all the candidates and do not vote just because of the letter (R,D,I) behind their names. I am the same way with issues. I do not think well a certain party feels this way about an issue so I have to too. I think for myself. I am more conservative but I would not call myself a republican.
@bayernfan (1430)
• Canada
23 Apr 09
These are interesting comments. I'm sure that you don't believe in any of the parties currently on offer, but does that preclude you from supporting or joining a party in the future? What if a party came along that shared your views and practiced what they preached? I think it is unwise to unconditionally support anyone/anything just because of what has been said. One can lend their support to a party temporarily in order to test the party's word or ability to perform. Support can be withdrawn. Isn't that what independents do by nature?
@starr4all (2865)
19 Apr 09
I think a political parties policies and issues are part of it. I also go by their actions and such. I've been a registered Democrat since I was 18. This was the first time I voted McCain. I didn't want too, I wanted third party but it felt like a wasted vote. I was disgusted by the nasty campaign they did and the uncalled for trashing of Palin's family and such. I think overall they were lower than dirt with the campaigning. Now, they say the Republicans have done it in the past. SO. They should have acted better but they didn't. I also didn't agree with some of the campaign promises.
@coolcoder (2020)
• United States
19 Apr 09
I'm seriously thinking of changing my party affiliation from the Republican party to the Constitutionalist party. I've been very disgusted at the way the Republicans have just caved in to the Democrats--I don't care if they are the minority party, they can and they should fiercely oppose what the Taxocrats are doing, but they aren't. That makes them just as corrupt as the other party.
@bayernfan (1430)
• Canada
23 Apr 09
It's certainly getting harder to tell Republican politicians apart from their Democrat counterparts. The may talk a good game but they act the same. I don't notice many differences between the Bush administration and the Obama administration in its first 100 days. Especially on foreign and economic policy. Only that American deficits and debt are growing more rapidly. Michael Geithner appears to be a miniature Henry Paulson and Hilliary Clinton sounds exactly the same as Condoleeza Rice. Both administrations had/have the same view(s) on illegal immigration. Do you mean the Constitution Party. I looked them up and they sound intriguing. Apparently, they rank third nationally amongst all United States political parties in registered voters.
• Australia
20 Apr 09
if i want to join in a political party,i get conclude that whether they are following in good way or not,if they ae policies ,aims,etc are good,i will join with them,or after i joined in the party,if they changed any rules or going in wrong way,i get signoff from the party,and also i will cancel my membership there.
• India
20 Apr 09
well different people have different thoughts and different ways of doing things so everytime there is a new leader for the party there is some change be it in policies or be it in goals.i usually go for a party or candidate i like who has worked hard or atleast proves himself worthy of vote from me.
@murderistic (2280)
• United States
20 Apr 09
Party politics are 100% unimportant to me, I am a registered independent.