Birthday Wishes tae Rabbie Burns!

@owlwings (43914)
Cambridge, England
January 25, 2021 12:57pm CST
Tonight is Burns' Night! (pronounced 'Burns Nicht' with a rolling Scottish 'R', a short 'i', as in 'lit' and a 'CH' that comes from the back of the throat). It's the birthday of Robert Burns, a simple farm labourer, who was born on 25 January 1759. He was educated mainly by his father but he also learned French and Latin at local schools. He's mainly remembered nowadays for his poetry and songs (perhaps the best known is "My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose") and he is regarded as the National Bard of Scotland. Many of his poems are in Scottish dialect but the one which is often read today - "Address to The Haggis" -, on the occasion of his birthday, is in English with some dialect words. I had better explain, first, what a haggis is. The word 'haggis' means 'something chopped (hacked) up', so it's basically bits of animal chopped up and mixed with oatmeal, herbs and spices and stuffed into the stomach of a sheep or pig to make a large, fat sausage. Traditionally. this poor man's fare made from the lungs, brains, liver and other offal of sheep and pigs is served with 'hashit tatties and bashit neeps' (mashed potato and pounded turnip) but the meal often includes cabbage and other vegetables. Being Scottish, it is traditional to serve it with a not-so-wee dram of whisky on the side (and that is used both to drink a toast to the bard and to wash the haggis down). Please raise your glasses to the memory of Rabbie Burns, one of the finest poets in history! https://youtu.be/qJSjAGVV6Zg
29 people like this
24 responses
@DianneN (225672)
• United States
25 Jan
Cheers to Rabbie Burns! I happen to be a lover of haggis and Burns. He also wrote Auld Lang Zyne, To a Mouse, and Halloween.
9 people like this
@xFiacre (9294)
• Ireland
25 Jan
@DianneN Growing up I used to think he was a Rabbi!
7 people like this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
25 Jan
A good haggis is to die for (and I have just eaten one!)
4 people like this
@DianneN (225672)
• United States
25 Jan
@owlwings I won’t be having any until I return to Scotland.
3 people like this
@topffer (41907)
• France
25 Jan
I tasted haggis in Scotland long ago. Hmm, the main reason why I would like to see Scotland back in the EU is more whisky than haggis to tell you the truth Very good discussion Owl
6 people like this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
25 Jan
I agree that France has a lot of good spirits but nothing quite like good Scotch whisky, I believe. Haggis is just rillettes on steroids, after all!
4 people like this
@topffer (41907)
• France
25 Jan
@owlwings Most of French spirits are digestive drinks, whisky is an aperitive drink, and the more solde here, we drink more whisky than Britons
4 people like this
@myklj999 (56845)
• Olney, Illinois
25 Jan
(pronounced 'Burns Nicht' with a rolling Scottish 'R', a short 'i', as in 'lit' and a 'CH' that comes from the back of the throat) I'll take yer word fer it.
4 people like this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
25 Jan
You can say 'yeuch' if yer want to!
2 people like this
@myklj999 (56845)
• Olney, Illinois
25 Jan
@owlwings Last time I tried rolling out a Scottish 'R' it took me three weeks to untangle my tongue
3 people like this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
25 Jan
2 people like this
@MALUSE (65444)
• Germany
25 Jan
I am not adventurous enough to want to try this specialty.
4 people like this
@TheSojourner (30441)
• United States
25 Jan
Cheers to you and Rabbie! I absolutely LOVED haggis when I ate it in 1999/2000 when I was on holiday in Scotland.
4 people like this
@rebelann (84091)
• El Paso, Texas
25 Jan
That was interesting, didn't understand the whole thing but it had a nice rhythm to it Raising my glass to Robert Burns
3 people like this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
25 Jan
There are some strange words in it which need translating. but the video is a clear rendition of the authentic accent and the images chosen do match the meaning quite well. Burns was a singer before he was a poet, I suspect, so the rhythm would be important to him.
3 people like this
@CarolDM (130225)
• United States
25 Jan
Cheers to the memory of Rabbie Burns.
3 people like this
@LadyDuck (336830)
• Switzerland
26 Jan
I never tasted haggis and I am sure that I would like. Curious that I have read today haggis mentioned in a local newspaper talking about "food around the world".
2 people like this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
26 Jan
Now that I think about it, the texture of a haggis is not unlike a risotto made with liver and herbs because a large part of it appears to be whole oat berries, which have a bite to them rather like rice. It's drier and not as sticky as a risotto and has rather less grain and more meat than a risotto would but the two are not dissimilar except in the manner of cooking (a haggis is boiled in its skin for several hours, which is why it's called a 'pudding').
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (336830)
• Switzerland
26 Jan
@owlwings We make a sausage risotto in Milan and I imagine that it can be similar, I have to see if there is a place where I can try haggis, surely not here in our small corner of the world, but may be in Milan... the day the borders will open again.
2 people like this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
26 Jan
@owlwings You can also buy haggis in a tin (in normal times, at least). I don't know how good it is: I have heard that it can be dreadful but this one looks as though it might be alright.
https://www.thehaggis.com/shop/haggis/traditional-scotch-haggis/
1 person likes this
@Babale (1859)
• Semarang, Indonesia
26 Jan
Why do you call him a poor person? Did he live very poor or did something happen?
2 people like this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
26 Jan
His family had very little money. His father was a farm manager and the farms he managed seemed always to fail (whether that was bad luck or bad management doesn't seem to be recorded). "Poor man's fare" is, however, an idiom. It means 'very basic food, of the kind that a person with little money would eat'. Meat was (and is) expensive and the best of it (if you had an animal to sell for meat) would be sold to those who could afford it. The offal - the liver, heart, stomach, lungs and brains - would be what was left for the poorer people and haggis was one way of using these parts of the animal and making what little meat there was go further. That is why I describe it as 'poor man's fare'.
2 people like this
@Babale (1859)
• Semarang, Indonesia
26 Jan
@owlwings Even though I really like dishes with offal ingredients such as liver or intestines.
2 people like this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
26 Jan
@Babale Offal is very nutritious, especially liver and heart. The thing is that it needs to be very fresh and clean, otherwise it can be dangerous.
2 people like this
@moonandstars (48629)
• Zagreb, Croatia (Hrvatska)
27 Jan
raising a glass but, sorry, i can't eat this
2 people like this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
27 Jan
There are vegetarian haggises. I would challenge anybody to tell them apart from the real thing.
2 people like this
• Zagreb, Croatia (Hrvatska)
29 Jan
@owlwings o, cool
2 people like this
@JimBo452020 (46113)
• Montrose, Scotland
25 Jan
Well Usually Burns Night is prominent in shops here. Not this year.
2 people like this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
25 Jan
Do you celebrate it? Or is it only the Sassenachs who love it? We had haggis tonight (and it was a good one, even if it was from Aldi) and, dare I say it: Welsh whisky! So the braw mannie was duly wished a merry 232nd birthday in style (though I didn't read the address).
1 person likes this
@JimBo452020 (46113)
• Montrose, Scotland
25 Jan
@owlwings We don't celebrate it, But I will have a few drams tonight later on. Maybe get Haggis from.the Chipper.
1 person likes this
@jobelbojel (23847)
• Philippines
13 Feb
I have not heard of him or maybe I did. I cannot remember. Thank you for sharing. Haggis sounds interesting.
2 people like this
@RebeccasFarm (29062)
• United States
10 Feb
Rabbie Burns RIP Never had haggis myself.
2 people like this
@Hannihar (113193)
• Israel
26 Jan
@owlwings Thank you for the post and the explanation and Happy Birthday to him.
2 people like this
@sallypup (44338)
• Moses Lake, Washington
25 Jan
I bought a sporran for my hubby's kilt for this year's Christmas gift. What a lovely post. Jeannie Ritchie sang Burn's poetry so beautifully.
2 people like this
@Fleura (14971)
• United Kingdom
25 Jan
I do enjoy a good haggis!
2 people like this
@Chellezhere (5175)
• United States
12 Apr
Being 45% Scots, and having a branch of his Burns' line in my own tree, I'd beg to differ with you on which of Burns' poems is most popular - well, at least here in the States anyway. More people are familiar with Auld Lang Syne and one line in To A Mouse. ("The best laid schemes o’ Mice an’ Men Gang aft agley..."). Sadly, haggis has been banned here since 1971.
Traditional Scottish haggis is banned in the United States. With Burns Night looming, how do fans satisfy their taste for oatmeal and offal?
1 person likes this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
13 Apr
That's a useful video and I must try what it recommends. It does assume, though, that there is a chair or something nearby. Of course, I didn't fall and there was nothing nearby in the garden. My daughter has since bought me a walking frame, which I don't need for walking, but which would be useful if I ever need to kneel down and want to get up again!
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Apr
@owlwings Perhaps for you it may seem useless. But others have had success from watching it.
1 person likes this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
13 Apr
@Chellezhere I didn't say it was useless! Far from it! I hope that your text-to-speech app read it correctly!
1 person likes this
@thelme55 (68044)
• Germany
4 May
Cheers to Rabbie Burns I have heard of him and his poetry. I have heard about the Haggis and I am curious how it tastes.
1 person likes this
@owlwings (43914)
• Cambridge, England
4 May
Haggis is really a kind of sausage made with coarse oatmeal and the liver and heart and certain other parts of a sheep finely chopped, mixed together with herbs and spices, stuffed into a sheep's stomach and boiled. It would be difficult to describe the taste but it is very herby (sage, onion and pepper) and with the flavour of the liver and heart coming through. The texture is more like a meaty risotto than a sausage, though, and fairly dry, so it's usually served with a brown gravy or sauce made with whisky (of course!) and cabbage or mashed turnip and mashed potato on the side.
1 person likes this
@thelme55 (68044)
• Germany
6 May
@owlwings It sounds worth trying. I hope I will get a chance to try it one day.
1 person likes this
• China
26 Jan
I am so uninformed that haven't known of Rabbie Burns whose stock is high in the circle of English poets.Searching online the poem "my love is like a red,red rose",find that love was written as luve and you as thee.
1 person likes this
• Pamplona, Spain
26 Jan
Wishing him all the best wherever he is. Have tried Haggis its nae ma favourite thing a tod a whisky maybe yes.
1 person likes this