How can one vote for Hillary Clinton and McCain?

United States
September 12, 2008 9:36pm CST
Well, as we all know, election time is nearing. I have always been an Obama supporter but from day one, I decided no matter who won the Democratic convention, I would vote Democratic (I am actually registered as an Independent). In reality, CLinton and Obama shared similar views and proposed similar solutions. Please enlighten me how one can vote for CLinton and then at least say that they are going to vote for McCain. Their policies and world view are so different. Please help me understand this question I have because this just confuses me.
3 people like this
7 responses
• Alexandria, Virginia
13 Sep 08
One can generally write in candidates for any office
• United States
13 Sep 08
Yes, one can. This brings up another issue. Because I believe the U.S is right at a crossroad, I PERSONALLY would not even consider writing in a candidate or not voting. I do believe the stakes are too high for lobbying for a third party or another candidate because I think it would be a "wasted" vote.
2 people like this
• United States
13 Sep 08
So you are voting for McCain - great. This is the beauty of living in a republic. However, I don't think you answered my question straight out but from your reply I am inferring that you think that people that voted for Clinton voted primarily on the experience factor. Thus once general election comes along they will vote again on the experience factor? Am I understanding your reply correctly? Assuming this is what you meant, the CLinton voters should have voted for McCain in the first place because I think he has more experience than Clinton. Anyway good luck - I just hope my candidate has more than yours :) LOL
1 person likes this
@equilady (43)
• United States
13 Sep 08
I actually think that Obama has lost ground by not choosing Hillary as his running mate. Unfortunately McCain was smart enough to capitalize on that by choosing a woman as his running mate. Why do you think he did that? Because he knew it would grab the all be it small portion of the Hillary supporters who were there more because she was a gutsy, modern WOMAN than because they agreed with her politics! It is amazing how many voters have no idea why they are voting for a certain candidate. I am also an independent. I can't stand it when someone votes for a candidate because they are democrat or republican just because that's how they are registered. Nine times out of ten they can't give you a good reason for being one or the other! Don't believe me? Try it! Ask a few people why they are one or the other. I find republicans are the most stuborn on this one.... "Because my whole family has always been." Great reason huh? So if their whole family decided to jump off a bridge they'd go too? Brilliant! After the 8 years we have just endured I can't really imagine an average intelligent "middle class" person voting for more of the same with McCain. Do the majority of Americans own big business and benefit from the "Bush/McCain" mind set? This is not to say I have never voted republican, because I have, when the republican was the better candidate. I will be voting for Obama this time. Not because he is a democrat, not because I think he has wonderful plans for us or particularly strong values, but because at this point in time I think he is the lesser of two evils! I just pray that enough people can see that AND that the election can somehow manage to be run honestly this time that we don't end up with another 4 years of insanity! And by the way I hate politics!!!!
• United States
14 Sep 08
Go independents!! I must say that both my husband and I voted for George Bush in his first term because he said he was an isolationist and he wanted to focus on our infrastructure and education. What a mistake!! What a candidate says and what he did as president couldn't be more opposite! Yes, why does anybody vote Republican nowadays unless they are wealthy or in on the corporations?? Politics and both parties are corrupt but it is a choice of the "lesser of the two evils", as you put it. THanks for your input.
• United States
13 Sep 08
I don't know the answer to this question either. I can't wait to hear some of the answer to this.
2 people like this
• United States
13 Sep 08
Couldn't agree more!!
3 people like this
@ClarusVisum (2163)
• United States
13 Sep 08
Easy. You'd have to be extremely bitter to abandon both Hillary's issues and her own advice (she's behind Obama 100% herself) to put in a 'grudge vote' for McCain after voting for Hillary in the primaries. Fortunately, very few such people exist. The vast majority of people who CLAIM to fit into that category seem to have been revealed to be Republicans in disguise who are just trying to stir the pot and create conflicts in the Democratic party (the leader of one such group admitted to donating $500 to McCain's 2000 campaign, for example). Hillary's and Obama's supporters are united. I wouldn't be surprised that 95+% of the people who claim "I voted for Hillary in the primaries and now I'm voting for McCain" are in the group of Republicans that right-wing radio hosts encouraged to vote for Hillary in the primaries that came after McCain locked up the nomination in an attempt to keep Obama from being the Democratic candidate.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Sep 08
Ummm, interesting. I have heard of these things. I do believe this is happening. The extreme right-wingers do come up with some crazy plans. I am an optimist and sometimes I just can't believe (even though I know it happens - and not just in the Republican side, also the Democrats but to a lesser degree)that people can be so manipulative, liars, and deceitful. For the most part, I do believe the Democrats are united but I just heard on the news that a third of Hillary voters were saying they were voting for McCain, which seems like an awful lot. THanks for you input.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Sep 08
Yeah, a third. They wish.
1 person likes this
@bdugas (3581)
• United States
13 Sep 08
Well I thnk the democrats would of voted for Hillary she has spent 8 years in the Whitehouse and has some idea of what it takes to run this country. As for Obama a first time senator who has never run anything. They have decided that going with McCain is at least they will feel like they are getting someone that has been around a long time, who has fought and served his country many years. To me that is better than putting someone in office that has litterly done nothing. Can you name me one thing that Obama has done, most of the time if you look at his voting record, he don't vote or says present, present is not a vote. It appears to me that if he don't vote either way then whatever the outcome he can't be blamed for it. I too am a democrat and my granny would turn over in her grave to think i would vote Rep, but i want someone that I feel will do their best to keep us safe. Can you explain to me why all the terriorist countries are backing Obama, they don't get to vote so why would they back him, surely they must think that there is something in it for them, or could it be they see someone that will make it easier to get into the united states.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Sep 08
I am an Obama supporter. I vote the issues and I don't buy the spin and mud-slinging of either party. The issues that matter to be are: The economy, energy, education, foreign policy and women's rights. I don't know why a Hillary supporter would back McCain. They were probably voting with their heart and not with their head. How can you say the Republicans would keep us more safe when Bin Laden is still out there? They've diverted attention from Afghanistan to Iraq. Most of Al-Qaeda is in Afghanistan and Pakistan, not Iraq. McCain and Palin don't even have a plan for Pakistan. McCain says we should "stay out of Pakistan" Palin says we should "go in". It troubles me that McCain has said "He knows how to defeat them". Well then gosh darn it do it! If he's known how to "defeat them" and will only share that information if he's elected is political blackmail. If he doesn't know, he's lying. He's using scare tactics to gain votes and to divert from his positions on other major issues.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Sep 08
liscampbll, couldn't agree more with everything you said. bdugas, so basically, you are voting on experience and national security? I do wholeheartedly agree in that McCain definitely has more experience. Obama lacks in that field in comparison to McCain or Hillary (Palin a different story). However, policy and vision for the future I see as much more important than experience. I don't understand what the big deal is if "terrorist" countries like Obama. Have you ever thought that just maybe with Obama, countries wouldn't feel like the US is going to invade and occupy their country for no reason - that just maybe they will have a chance to actually talk out differences?
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27238)
• United States
13 Sep 08
It confuses me, too. I read some of the other responses here and I've heard it all before but it just makes no sense to me at all. Some say Hillary supporters are angry at the Democratic party but most typical voters don't think of the candidates as the party. The candidates belong to one of the parties because it most closely matches their ideology but they don't "run" the party. The "typical voter", who usually is't a political junkie, isn't thinking along the lines of "If Obama loses this year then Hillary will get another chance in 2012 but if he wins, he'll be the Democratic nominee then and if he wins again his V.P. will possibly be the next Democratic nominee, etc; the typical voter isn't thinking that far ahead! I know everyone doesn't base their votes on the same things that I do but I really can't see how it's very likely that someone who supported Hillary based on the issues and what is best for the country could turn on a dime and vote for McCain because Hillary isn't on the Democratic ticket and McCain chose a female who is Hillary's direct opposite as his running mate. Annie
1 person likes this
• United States
14 Sep 08
Hey, thanks for your opinion - my sentiments exactly.
@soooobored (1187)
• United States
14 Sep 08
People are more complicated than two parties. If you find yourself agreeing with one candidate over another, there is no reason not to cross party lines. Maybe the Hillary supporters are nervous that Obama is not seasoned enough as a politician? Who knows? But I respect the voter that chooses the candidate right for him or her, rather than just going with the tide.
• United States
16 Sep 08
I agree - party should not determine how one votes. I also don't think experience should either but rather policy and the candidate's proposed solutions to problems in our country.