WARNING: The FBI wants to talk to YOU!

United States
January 12, 2009 7:24am CST
Yes, it is true. There is a new internet scam going on. Be on the lookout for it. Here's how it goes. First, (as so often is the case) you receive an email. Then the email reveals itself as being not only from the FBI, but from the director himself! You are warned that agents will be coming to interrogate you soon. You are suspected of being a part of a money laundering, drug financing, or terrorist abetting money transaction. Do you want to avoid FBI agents coming to your house and putting you through tough questioning? Then send them all your bank account or other money account information so they can check you out without having to come to your house. Don't fall for it. It is a fake email. If I'm wrong, my next posting will be from prison! I say these guys are beyond having gaul. Why doesn't the real FBI arrest these clowns? What do you say?
2 people like this
14 responses
@Destiny007 (5820)
• United States
12 Jan 09
I have seen these, but deleted them unopened, so I wasn't really aware of the contents, but figured it was something along those lines. I figure if the FBI or any other law enforcement types want a sitdown, then they will come to visit in person, and not through an email. I have also gotten email from various government officials, and of course many foreign ones as well... and a whole lot of people in Nigeria. Fortunately, Gmail has an excellent spam filter, although I do have to occasionally rescue some things from it. The sad thing part is that there are people stupid enough to fall for these scams, and that is the reason they are around. I wonder how many people actually send money to these crooks?
3 people like this
• United States
13 Jan 09
I have no idea how many send money. I did once read a funny article by an American who had spent time in Nigeria and used that knowledge to string along the con men trying to con him. He did not get any money out of them, but he did get them to run all over town and take silly pictures of themselves.
@uath13 (8207)
• United States
13 Jan 09
LOL, I'm sure if the FBI wanted my information they'd have my direct line by now!!!! What a bunch Of B.S. You try to help some poor diplomat from Nigeria get their money out of the country & just look what it gets you......
2 people like this
• United States
13 Jan 09
Exactly! Every good deed does not go unpunished.
@uath13 (8207)
• United States
13 Jan 09
That's actually the motto here at work!
1 person likes this
@jonesy123 (3950)
• United States
12 Jan 09
It amazes me how many people still fall for this type of scam. People should know by now not to follow those links and not to freely hand out their information. But it's still happening. The scammers still manage to persuade people not only via email but also over the phone. Thanks for the warning. I hope it will save some people from being scammed;)
2 people like this
• United States
12 Jan 09
You are right that people still fall for these scams. Otherwise, there would not be so many of them!
1 person likes this
12 Jan 09
I am inclined to agree with you about it being a scam. If the FBI were coming to get you I'm sure the first we would know about it is them breaking down the door! I'm sure they won't be sending out warning emails!
• United States
12 Jan 09
Good point. How many criminals could the FBI catch if they warned them first? Perhaps, the ACLU will get congress to pass a law requiring the FBI to warn criminals before coming for them? That should protect criminal's rights!
1 person likes this
@clrumfelt (5421)
• United States
21 Jan 09
Had to take a minute to go load my shotgun. I never open those kinds of emails anyway, unless they're sent by someone I know. Many of them contain viruses.
• United States
21 Jan 09
You had to load your shotgun? I keep my loaded. Along with an assault rifle and several handguns.
1 person likes this
@speakeasy (4215)
• United States
13 Jan 09
I can tell you from actual experience; if the FBI wants to talk to you they do not send emails. (Let's face it; if they sent you an email and you were guilty; you would be skipping town immediately and disappearing. The FBI is smarter than that!) What does happen if they want to talk to you is they will come and knock on your door (home or office) and introduce themselves - "Hello, my name is Special Agent _________ from the FBI and I would like a few minutes of your time." That is what they did when they were looking for the people who used to rent an office space next to my office. "Why doesn't the real FBI arrest these clowns?" - Simple, time and money. There are so many other cases that they are investigating and helping local authorities with that they have a dollar limit on the cases they get involved in. If the crooks are stealing more than that limit; it is not cost effective to go after them.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jan 09
A very informative post. Thank you very much. Hopefully, I will remain ignorant of actually having the FBI come to see me. I went to see them once, but that is another post.
@speakeasy (4215)
• United States
13 Jan 09
Personally, I have no problem with the FBI visiting me. It's not like I ever get involved in anything illegal and the agent was very polite. He asked questions and I answered them as best I could. I really didn't know a lot. I knew when they moved out and the state they had moved to; but, we weren't friends so I didn't have a current address and hadn't been in contact with them. Actually, it was rather informative. We are not a big city, just 40,000 people at that time and I was actually surprised to find that we had an FBI office in our town! (I looked in our local phone book and there it was!) It made me feel good to know that they were that close if we ever needed them. I had always assumed they were only located in major cities.
• United States
13 Jan 09
I would say the FBI probably has accessed this information long before the person in question would have been notified. It would be necessary for their case against you. I don't know why more people don't use snopes.com. A lot of people could save their money and identities so easily.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jan 09
I regard snopes.com only as mostly reliable, not reliable. When using snopes.com make sure to check the exact wording and meaning of their response. They sometimes are misleading or incomplete.
@spalladino (17926)
• United States
13 Jan 09
I've been playing with these freaks off and on as part of a scam fighting site for over a year now and the FBI email is my favorite one! You can always tell a foreign scammer because they use phrases like "our dear country" or "our lovely citizens"...things we don't say here. There's a lot of scams out there.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jan 09
There was bad grammer in the email too, resulting from the different kind of sentence structure in other languages.
• India
13 Jan 09
Ok, I have now learnt about it, and will be alert. But what are they up to? What does they want. From a bank statement anyone cannot access the account. They need signatures and account numbers, and passwords for that. did they do any harm to anybody?
1 person likes this
• Netherlands
13 Jan 09
The real FBI doesn't arrest them because they are in Nigeria. It is a real drag to get such emails from them scammers. I wish everyone would only delete them and NEVER fall for it because then they will give up if no one in the world ever fell for their stupid tricks anymore.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jan 09
You are right. They would not continue to do it if it was not making them money.
@TessWhite (3147)
• United States
13 Jan 09
I find it hard to believe anyone would be stupid enough to fall for this scam. I've been receiving emails lately telling me my computer is hacked and if I'll download instructions and send them my password it will be "fixed." Yea, right. Now tell me about that bridge you've got for sale too will ya? :P LOL
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jan 09
I suppose if you send out 1,000,000 emails at least one the receipents has to be really stupid.
@gewcew23 (8011)
• United States
12 Jan 09
I applaud you in your attempt to protect ignoramus from themselves but ignoramus because they are ignorant. The only reason that an E-mail like this would work in the first place is because there are individuals out there that would fall for a scam like this. It is supply verses demand in a nut shell, enough ignoramus that would fall for anything enough intelligent individuals out there to take advantage of the ignorant.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jan 09
I guess I need to accept some are too stupid to help.
• United States
12 Jan 09
There is no way any email, regardless of who is is supposed to be from, would get me to divulge any type of personal or financial information.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jan 09
Sorry!
1 person likes this
@lampar (7597)
• United States
26 Jan 09
FBI come after me by sending me a mail to warn me , that will be nice ! No wonder we have so many criminals walking around free. lol!!!Thank for the warning ,FBI.
• United States
27 Jan 09
Actually, the FBI has been doing some good work the last few years catching corrupt politicians! Good for them.
1 person likes this
@lampar (7597)
• United States
28 Jan 09
Thump up for them! That is a good news. lol!