Could YOU Pass the U.S. Citizenship Test?

@anniepa (27241)
United States
September 20, 2009 1:06am CST
I just had to post this after I found this while posting to another discussion I'd started. The previous thread was about how 25% of Oklahoma high school students didn't know who the first President of the United States had been and in a related article I also discovered only 3% of those student could have passed the test given to immigrants wishing to become citizens. I'm proud to say I knew them all...lol! In order to become a U.S. citizen one must answer 6 out of the 10 questions correctly. Here they are: What is the supreme law of the land? What do we call the first ten amendments to the Constitution? What are the two parts of the U.S. Congress? How many justices are there on the Supreme Court? Who wrote the Declaration of Independence? What ocean is on the east coast of the United States? What are the two major political parities in the United States? We elect a U.S. senator for how many years? Who was the first President of the United States? Who is in charge of the executive branch? To be fair to the OK kids, it was stated there had been similar results in Arizona so it's probably a good bet the rest of the states wouldn't fare too great either! So, are you smarter than a 12th grader? Annie
1 person likes this
17 responses
@ZephyrSun (7385)
• United States
20 Sep 09
When I graduated high school it was the last class that didn't have to take the state test, here we call it OGT (Ohio Graduation Test). But, we had to take it because the rest of the school had to take it. The test for 4 parts; Math, Writing, Reading and Citizenship. A few of the questions that you asked were on the test. I hate to sound like a conservative here but, lol Bush had the right idea with "NCLB" it just went astray with the feds involving themselves with it.
2 people like this
@anniepa (27241)
• United States
21 Sep 09
No, you don't really sound too much like a conservative! Ted Kennedy als had a lot to do with NCLB and I understand he was very disappointed with the direction it took. Annie
• United States
21 Sep 09
Had to chime in to lol @ the Bush/conservative standard. I thought it was only a Bill Maher thing that, unless you call him a bumbling, redneck, draft-dodging idiot on a daily basis, you're really in love with him and want to help fix his fench post at the ranch. Please tell me you don't have the Maher poster hangin'! :P
@ZephyrSun (7385)
• United States
21 Sep 09
"I thought it was only a Bill Maher thing that, unless you call him a bumbling, redneck, draft-dodging idiot on a daily basis, you're really in love with him and want to help fix his fench post at the ranch. Please tell me you don't have the Maher poster hangin'!:P" Pay attention, not all liberals hang on every word that a liberal commentator says, it's a liberal thing. Most of us have the ability to think on our own, do you? I think G.W. Bush did a lot of stupid things but, I give praise where praise is do and since he didn't write the bill I don't fault him for it going astray. I hope "fench" was a typo for fence and I suppose that if I was in Texas and he needed help, yep I would help him because I'll help anyone that asks for help. Nope, no Bill Maher poster and I've only seen him a few times, I like him because he gets the conservatives underwear all in a bunch and I love that.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10963)
• Philippines
20 Sep 09
Hi anniepa. My parents came home from California three years ago and they brought cereals in boxes that contain information about the good old USA. My daughter, amused, asked my parents the questions to find out if my parents are worthy of being American citizens. The questions are just about the same as the ones you listed. Except for the supreme law and G. Washington, the only other thing they know is the Star-spangled Banner. So I asked my mother, what questions were she asked. She said... they asked me if I could read and write. She said yes. Then she was given a paper to write her name. She wrote her name legibly (my mother has good penmanship). Then they said "Congratulations, you are now an American citizen."
2 people like this
@anniepa (27241)
• United States
21 Sep 09
That's interesting. How long ago was that? Annie
@eileenleyva (10963)
• Philippines
22 Sep 09
Two decades ago.
• Indonesia
20 Sep 09
dunno bout it. I am not US Citizen if what you posted is true, means the education in your country is in danger the youth should have a little more extra on the country
2 people like this
@anniepa (27241)
• United States
21 Sep 09
I agree, they sure should learn more about their own country! Annie
@us2owls (1681)
• United States
20 Sep 09
When I became a citizen I took the test. Not only did it have questions about national things but there were several about the state in which I took the test - Illinois. I once took the test to try and get a job working in our local post office. I passed it with the highest score of the people who took that particular test at that time but did not get the job. The man who got the job had a far lower score than me, claimed points for being a veteran and still with that did not equal my score and he eventually became postmaster. Nothing has changed over the years - its not a case of what you know but who you know.
2 people like this
@anniepa (27241)
• United States
21 Sep 09
OF COURSE someone like that became postmaster! I worked for the USPS for 18 years and it was always known that those who couldn't (or wouldn't) do the actual WORK ended up going into management. That explains a lot, doesn't it? My first postmaster and the one who hired me told me in 1987 when I had my first (unsuccessful) interview that when a position became available the PM was given a list of the top five scorers who had listed that particular office or branch as where they wished to be considered for hire. They would generally interview them all and choose from them, not necessarily the one with the highest score, which includes the bonus points veterans receive. HOWEVER, if there was a veteran in that group and he or she passed the physical and met all the other requirements (driving record, not a convicted felon, etc.) that veteran MUST be hired even if he or she had the lowest score. A veteran got the position I was originally interviewed for. He was in his fifties and had "bad knees" but he still "technically" passed the physical so against his better judgment the PM had to hire him. Three months later I was called for another interview because this veteran failed to pass his 90 day probation period. Delivering mail, especially when most of the routes are 100% on foot and in an area where the winters are pretty brutal is a demanding job and it wasn't the idea position for a 50+ year old guy with knee problems! I was in my early thirties and in good shape and it was quite a workout for me at first! I'm not sure if it's still exactly like this now but that's how it was in 1987. Annie
@jb78000 (15173)
20 Sep 09
what was the average number they got right? i got 5, which hardly matters as i have no intention of moving to the states (no cheering from people i disagree with please).
1 person likes this
@xfahctor (14128)
• Lancaster, New Hampshire
20 Sep 09
booooooo! Hisssssssssssss! boooooooooooo! **snicker......my turn to be the village drunk today.
3 people like this
@jb78000 (15173)
20 Sep 09
well if that is meant to be cheering then i think you should take your bottle of bourbon and bits of straw and return to 'easily confused' straightway. anyway it might have been 6 or 7 (it wasn't that tricky) but i need as many excuses as i can find to avoid your godforsaken country xfahctor.
1 person likes this
@xfahctor (14128)
• Lancaster, New Hampshire
20 Sep 09
I mis-read, i read that as "jeering" for some reason or other.....so.... *THUNDEROUS APPLAUSE
2 people like this
@matersfish (6311)
• United States
20 Sep 09
I learned these things out of school. Only a few of the obvious (not-so these days lol) were actually taught to me in classrooms. I do hope that schools are teaching children these things ... plus a lot more! Not for nothing, but schools seem to be all about teaching guilt and sympathy and ways to cope with your feelings. A lot of what I learned in school was better ways to treat other people and how religion was basically immoral (true story!!!). Okay, some people may not have a problem with this. But it brings up an extremely relevant question, regardless of what you believe. Should schools be teaching morality lessons or actual math, history, science (real science -- not the to-spite-religion science I was taught), business and computer skills, etc? I know things are a little different all over, but in my school, which I attended in the 90s, we were more or less parented and "knowledge" was extremely relative, depending on how good you felt about yourself. Shiny, happy people. ...... I was talking to my mom a few months ago about that crazy texting commercial where the family is talking in acronyms (I didn't learn that word until high school!): OMG, BFF, etc. She asked, "What is that? Is it more convenient?" I told her that it wasn't a language created by computer-loving kids out of convenience, but out of necessity because schools weren't teaching them how to READ AND WRITE. I hope I'm wrong there. I don't have any kids to grill when they get home. I only know how I was coddled in school.
1 person likes this
• United States
21 Sep 09
My social studies teacher (11th grade) had his "brilliant" idea for punishment. If you spoke out in class, acted up, failed to turn in your work, etc, he would put you in the back closet for 15 minutes, during which time he would speak LOUDLY to the class about how much of a distraction one person can be to the group, and that all "teaching" would stop until the disobedient student came back. He would set up a peer review, asking random students to address the forsaken when he or she returned, spouting off your feelings about rouge behavior and how it damages the process. It was all too weird for me. My math teacher (Balki from Perfect Strangers! lmao) had a different system entirely. He would write you up and ship you to the principal's office. Balki had a kid act out every week, Mr. Sensitive had about 3 kids a day in the loveless room of disgrace. I kept my Sony Walkman back there. 15 minutes of bliss.
@Eisenherz (2912)
• Portugal
21 Sep 09
Well, I really hold no interest in ever havign american citizenship someday but here are my answers anyway: 1. Freedom for all? 2. The same ones as in the bible? Or were those commandements? :) 3. Eastern and Western? 4. I'd risk 3. 5. Erm...Abraham Lincoln. Or George Washington. Certainly not Orson Wells? ;) 6. Atlantic Ocean (yay!) 7. Democratic Party and Republican Party (double yay!) 8. Um, 5? 9. Abraham Lincoln or George Washington again :S 10. The Minster of Finances? Not.. Okay, I'm hangover and couldn't be more random, not this dumb ;D
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27241)
• United States
21 Sep 09
You're right...certainly not Orson Wells...lol! Annie
• United States
21 Sep 09
I'm embarrassed to say I missed two of them, but, at least, I can be a citizen.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27241)
• United States
21 Sep 09
Trust me, you have no reason to be embarrassed...lol! Annie
@Taskr36 (13925)
• United States
21 Sep 09
I can and I've known these answers since high school when I helped a friend from South Africa study for and pass the test. Frankly this test should be taught to all high school students (no, not federally mandated) so they can understand what it means to be a citizen of this country the same way those who legally immigrate here do. Far too many people take their citizenship for granted here.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27241)
• United States
21 Sep 09
Something like this shouldn't have to be federally mandated but IF a state decides it's not important maybe it should be, in my view. You're so right, too many people take their citizenship for granted. Annie
• United States
20 Sep 09
I knew them all. Heck my 6 year old knows some them. He can tell you who the first president of the US was. He learned that in kindergarten.He also knows which Ocean is one the east coast of the country. They have already covered that this year in first grade. It just shows how bad our schools are failing our kids. I think anyone above the 7th grade should be able to answer them all. The fact that they can't reflects more on our school system than them.
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@anniepa (27241)
• United States
21 Sep 09
Absolutely, lil, it's not the kids' fault. I mean, if it were only a small number of students from any particular state or region who didn't know these things then it could be blamed on the fact that some kids just don't care but when it's three out of four it's pathetic. In OK it was only 2 out of 100 who could answer 6 of the questions I posted here! Annie
@spalladino (17926)
• United States
20 Sep 09
Back in the day (gawd, I hate that phrase!) we were taught this stuff in school...and I also drilled 4 kids in this area so they could pass the state tests for graduation so, yeppers, I got them all right!
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27241)
• United States
21 Sep 09
I know what you mean, my grandkids think that "back in the day" meant back when we still had covered wagons...lol! I'm quite pleased and proud to report I did my own unscientific survey at the Midget Football game yesterday and asked several dozen kids between fifth and eight grades who the first President was and every one knew it! I have no idea if that's indicative of my whole state but it makes me feel good about the school district my grandkids attend! Annie
• United States
20 Sep 09
I found it really easy, Annie. I hope I'm not too unusual for that. Joanne
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27241)
• United States
21 Sep 09
I'm afraid you are too unusual since I feel every American past fifth or sixth grade should know them all! Maybe that's just me... Annie
• United States
20 Sep 09
Could YOU Pass the U.S. Citizenship Test? Yes I could and did. When I was studying US History I would sometimes ask my friends and colleagues for help.... that was a big mistake! As far as presidents their knowledge was scanty to say the least but as far as the length of terms in office for senators, congressmen, etc. that was a shocker... about 90% did not have a clue!
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27241)
• United States
21 Sep 09
That is very sad, isn't it? I've heard stories for years about how only a very small percentage of Americans even know who their own Senators or Congressmen are and many don't even know who the Vice President is at any given time! Annie
@satan88 (586)
• United States Minor Outlying Islands
20 Sep 09
hmmm i don't think i can get all the questions right but i think i can get 6 out of ten. this is a pretty easy test. i'm from canada and i have no problems with most of them. Except the one about the amendments question.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27241)
• United States
21 Sep 09
Do you mean the one that asks what the first ten amendments are called? That would be the Bill of Rights. I think you're doing fine for a Canadian! I know almost nothing about your government...lol! Annie
@K46620 (1996)
• United States
28 Sep 09
1. The Constitution 2. Bill of Rights 3. Senate and House of Representatives 4. 9 justices (I'll add more for bonus points! FDR wanted to water it down to 15) 5. Thomas Jefferson drafted it 6. Atlantic 7. Republican, Democrat 8. 6 years 9. George Washington 10. The President
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@aerous (13474)
• Philippines
22 Sep 09
Since I have no plan to go somewhere else in the United State although I dream that when I was a kid. Now, that I am old and that dream is change. I don't need to pass that , my friend...have a nice day!
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
21 Sep 09
I'm sorry to say I only got nine right. Isn't it a shame that anyone educated in the United States wouldn't know who the first President was? I've been out of school for 39 years. What do they teach now? Many want to blame the students, but I think the educational system has to answer for a lot of the problem.